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Discussion Starter #1
My wife and I have been talking about buying this attachment to her mixer for the last couple weeks. While she really enjoys baking she has never ground her own wheat and used it before.

Before some of you start telling me what the best hand mill is for SHTF, we really are just wanting to dabble in this and give it a try. If we have things worked out to where we like it we will get a hand one for back-up, but buying this works in the fact that we get to experiment and if we don't care for what we are doing it can be repackaged as a gift for one of my many female relatives that has one of those mixers. (Yes we are frugal.)

If possible when you give your review please give a ratio of store bought white flour to home ground wheat flour as a basis to changing the type of food you eat.

While I mention only this attachment if you want to discuss others that's cool I won't consider it a derail especially since not every one that I have bought her worked as expected for the brand or the use we had planned for it.

She isn't on here often, but will be checking this thread every couple days both to see the results, and to answer any questions that you may have on other attachments. Like I said some are great, and some were a disappointment for what you pay for a premium brand and how you expect it to perform.
 

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We have had many attachments for our Kitchen Aid mixer, all with good results (we even replaced most after the second fire). However, I am reluctant to buy the grain mill attachment. The reason being, I think the grain mill will put more strain on the motor and gears than the other attachments even for occasional use.

This time around (fire #3) we have already purchased the mixer and the spiralizer with many more attachment to come, but we will be shopping for a stand alone grain mill.

Just my own thoughts YMMV.
 

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I would strongly suggest you pass on this attachment.

A true mill with both steel burrs and stones will give better results for different gains. The ability to power the mill by hand cannot be overlooked.

An example of a better choice would be this : Wonder Mill Jr
(https://pleasanthillgrain.com/wonder-junior-deluxe-grain-mill)



This is worth doing some real homework and asking folks that mill their own grains now to see what works for them - and what doesn't. This is potentially a large $$ investment, so shopping is advised.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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We have a 'Kitchen Aid Grain Mill'.

Our land is not well suited to growing wheat, so we dont grow wheat. My wife grows a lot of beans though, and she uses her Kitchen Aid Grain Mill to grind beans into flour.

Pick a setting, run all of that days beans through. Then spin the dial a half-turn tighter and run them through again. At best she will recycle the material through the mill 4 or 5 times, before she finally gets 'flour'.

The machine will get hot, and you need to shut it down to cool off once an hour. If you run it for an hour, the casing around the motor will be so hot that touching it will nearly burn you. So for each hour of run-time, follow with a half an hour to cool down.

I just asked my wife and she said that on a 1-to-5 scale she would give it a 5.

We bought our Kitchen Aid in 1983.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
We have a 'Kitchen Aid Grain Mill'.

Our land is not well suited to growing wheat, so we dont grow wheat. My wife grows a lot of beans though, and she uses her Kitchen Aid Grain Mill to grind beans into flour.

Pick a setting, run all of that days beans through. Then spin the dial a half-turn tighter and run them through again. At best she will recycle the material through the mill 4 or 5 times, before she finally gets 'flour'.

The machine will get hot, and you need to shut it down to cool off once an hour. If you run it for an hour, the casing around the motor will be so hot that touching it will nearly burn you. So for each hour of run-time, follow with a half an hour to cool down.

I just asked my wife and she said that on a 1-to-5 scale she would give it a 5.

We bought our Kitchen Aid in 1983.
So yours is a Hobart as is ours. Do you know how many watts it is? Ours is a K5SS and is actually only 300W, but because our generic 750 watt meat grinder died less than a month before she bought this (used only had it since around turkey day) I bought the metal meat grinder attachment.

I don't know actual specs and ratings between the two machines, but this attachment seems to grind faster, and the plates and blades are interchangeable being a standard size. That is not only a surprise on the speed, but the main reason we think of buying the grain mill to "dip our toes into the water" so to speak.

Oh and I don't have a dial on the mixer, the speeds are on a slider, so I assume you mean the dial on the mill?

EDIT: I would think dry beans would be harder on it that wheat berries. Is that true?
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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So yours is a Hobart as is ours. Do you know how many watts it is? Ours is a K5SS and is actually only 300W, but because our generic 750 watt meat grinder died less than a month before she bought this (used only had it since around turkey day) I bought the metal meat grinder attachment.
Ours is rated at 300 watts.



... Oh and I don't have a dial on the mixer, the speeds are on a slider, so I assume you mean the dial on the mill?

EDIT: I would think dry beans would be harder on it that wheat berries. Is that true?
Our mill has a dial that controls how close the two plates are together.

If beans are too moist they will turn to mush and gum up the stone burrs. They need to be at least one year dried.
 

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I bought that attachment for my daughter. She used it a couple times until she realized the motor was getting very hot. I think it’s just too much. I have a kitchen aid from the 1940’s that I inherited from my grandma. It’s built like a tank but these newer ones aren’t.
 

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In Memory
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We have a heavy duty commercial grade Hobart meat grinder at our BOL.
It will grind all sorts of beans, without even getting warm.

 
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Fifteen or twenty years ago I purchased a Family Grain Mill "Jupiter" grain mill and have been using it at least twice a month all that time. Cost around $160. Currently they have them on E-Bay, used. The one I got also had a hand grinder attachment. I have had two mills since 1970, but this one was by far the best. Lightweight plastic and adjustable. If you can find the main machine plus hand attachment, buy it. At the time I got it you could order a flaking attachment.
 

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I don't know about grain but our kitchen aid met grinder attachment works great.
 
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I don't know about grain but our kitchen aid met grinder attachment works great.
I have used the meat grinder attachment for years with no issues, but this time around I think I will buy a dedicated meat grinder because I plan on grinding more meats for sausage and salami and such.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
We're still on the fence on this and wife who is the baker is getting a few medical things done. She will be down and out for a couple-three weeks, so I'm still thinking.

Good feedback from FBK though.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Bean flour shifts your bread from being a carb to a protein.

I have been curious about using oats, but every oat bread we can find is simply wheat flour with a small amount of rolled oats folded in. My wife says that oat flour has a very short shelf life. I think that if you are milling your flour every week, it should be fine to blend bean and oat flours for a really good bread that avoids so many people's sensitivities.
 
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