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Fubar Artist
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi
First "real" post here. Something that i posted on another board that kinda went nowhere... But is pretty important to me. Sorry if its a long read:rolleyes: but I promise to keep it short in the future:thumb:



Lately I’ve been giving thought to the matter of having small children in the midst of life changing events. It’s something that weighs heavily on my mind and heart. My son is about to turn 6 and my daughter is 2.

I think the reason it bothers me so much is because they are really getting the short end of the stick—being born into a messed up world that they had no part of; inheriting the fruit of the sins of their fathers. I am well aware though and I say it all the time … “Who says life is fair?” “It is what it is…Now what are you going to do about it?”

I’ve resigned myself to figuring out “what I’m going to do about it.”- As any preparedness minded person has. The obvious basics are being addressed as well as can be- kids are just little people after all.. Food, Water, Shelter. As for water and shelter, obviously the need is to stay hydrated and protections from the heat and cold. To be concise primarily on the food requirements, here’s a few thoughts I’ve gathered:

Food – Kids can be picky eaters refusing to eat their favorite dishes even when their world is safe and secure. The idea in my estimation is to have some semblance of normalcy and I believe that this can be had by making sure that their diet does not go from pizza and mac-n-cheese to MRE’s overnight. BUT WAIT!! – Mac-n-Cheese actually has a pretty good shelf life!

Powdered milk
Breakfast cereal – (Stored in Mason Jar – Dry can style and in Mylar)
Kool-aide, Gatorade &/or other drink mixes
Dehydrated fruit and (some) veggies – especially carrots! (my kids like carrots)
PASTA- (invaluable)
Sugar – Kids gotta have sugar- right?
Canned spaghetti and ravioli
Fresh eggs if you are fortunate enough to have chickens.
Fresh Bread from milled grain (I gotta work on that one)
Chewable vitamins
HARD CANDY! – in moderation of course.
And certainly their diet will be supplemented or even sustained w/ anything the grownups may be eating especially in order to get necessary proteins… meat, beans, ect.

That list can definitely go on (it does) and be expanded on – Pease DO!

Now that I have addressed the physical needs, what about a kid’s emotional needs; what about the sudden jolt to their mentality that “hey – everything is cool… life is fun… Mommy and Daddy will ALWAYS be there to take care of me…” What about when THAT goes away. How do you prep for that?? Heck, I’m having a tough time potty training my 2 year old. Now this?!? :D

Well yeah – this is where it gets tough alright. For the toddler I see an advantage and a disadvantage all at once. The advantage?? – she will have less to unlearn. The disadvantage is that she can’t comprehend just yet what will actually be going on around her; but she will pick up on the fact that something is very wrong. She will cling to mother and father and be very whiney for sure; probably won’t sleep well and get picky with her eating.
What can I do about all of that? Love her. Hold her a lot. Be patient with her. Try to make time to play toys with her. All in-between checking provisions, patrolling and scouting intel, maintaining fortifications, and defending against JBT’s and roving gangs of MZBBWG’s (mutant zombie biker bandits w/ guns) – yes I jest a bit here, but no one honestly knows what we’ll be dealing with – BUT – I do know that kids will need attention and I am no less a father once the doo doo splatters.

Now- w/ my 6 year old I can make some adjustments. I feel a bit more comfortable about what I can teach him. Not because he’s a boy but because he’s older. All in the same day I can take him to a baseball game, ride bikes, and we can have a father to son talk about the world we live in. I can teach him to appreciate and be thankful for what he has. We can talk about how in some places of the world children go without toys or bikes…… or food… or clothes….. or their mommies and daddies… because they were killed by soldiers or terrorists or by indiscriminate roadside bombs or tsunami’s earthquakes and fire. Shoot…we can even get on the net and look at pictures of those kids – tears in their eyes and blood on their clothes. He has to know it’s real.

Yeah I’m sure I raised some eyebrows…. Maybe made some gasp. I don’t do that out of some sick demented desire to get a shocked reaction out of him. I don’t do that to make the boy a man… not yet. I still want him to be a kid. I still want him to enjoy life. He’s blessed. I want him to appreciate it. From there I want to teach him that what he sees on that computer screen could be easily seen here where he lives in his lifetime. – From that vantage point, he gets the red pill dissolved in his daily kool-aid. So basically I try to teach him patience, respect, physical and mental toughness, compassion and longsuffering, problem solving, and – the boy can shoot. :D

I do have to admit. This is not easy. I sometimes think I am too hard on the boy. Expect too much of him.. but at the same time, I don’t really feel all that bad about it- under the circumstances, he’ll be way better off than J6p’s marshmallow rug rats.


Sorry for the long post at any rate – and I didn’t do it to get ANY validation or approval. This is how I’m doing it. I may change some but for now – this is the plan. I’m very interested to hear what others are doing.
 

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bad grammar deal with it
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the wife and myself are thinking about doing the kid thing when i get back from my deployment so ive been trying to read up as much as i can about doing the prepping thing with children in mind. good read thanks
 

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Getting Ready
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another reason im glad, i don't have kids.

im not married, but have been with my gf for a while (three years). so if it hits kids won't even be an issue, at least not for a long time.

T
 

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First off, welcome to the board! Good post, glad you brought this up. We have a six year old son as well. This last summer, I found myself worried as well over the possibility of foreign troops on our soil. I don't consider myself a tin hatter (too much), just a realist and aware of our ever changing world. I am also worried about my children and how/when/if to bring up my fears without totally freaking them out. That said, I made up a game to play with him. We practiced "escape to the base". I decided to made it a fun game. He basically gets to jump out his window, dive into the sea grass (in the back yard and down the hill), and crawl into the safety zone (we can see the house, but you can't see us). Needless to say, my husband thought I was nuts, but the boy loved it!! Hopefully "it" never happens, but if it does, he will also remember what he needs to do. We have not practiced at night, maybe this spring or summer we'll improvise and hopefully get dad involved too. I hope to see others post their ideas too.
 

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Excellent post!

My 2 cents worth (being past the small kids stage). No matter what happens when kids are that small, they can adjust. It all depends on the adults they they are with. If you stay sane, so will they.
 

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Fubar Artist
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Excellent post!

My 2 cents worth (being past the small kids stage). No matter what happens when kids are that small, they can adjust. It all depends on the adults they they are with. If you stay sane, so will they.

Thanks - That's a comforting thought.

and thanks to you all for the kind remarks.
Oh - and that's a Neat "drill" mist:thumb:

I'd appreciate any more suggestions.. more da better:D:
 

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Well, first off I have a 10 year old daughter, I work with her by teaching her how to use all of my weapons (safety first of course), how to load, fire, and clean them. I've also started to teach her some knot work and fire building skills. I've found if you go slow and be patient kids will pick up a ton of information! I hope like hell she'll never have to use anything I teach her, but if she does, I know she'll have the basic principals and skills to survive! Good luck with your little ones!
 

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Very good post. Make sure you double up on all your childrens meds and bandages. I have a 4 and 2 yr old. One had a small mishap and I burned through a lot of bandages. He is fine now. I have really been focusing on the med side lately just for the kids. I also take them outside constantly and tec them responsibility with our live stock.
Yes this world is gonna suck, but the easier the transition the better!
 

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Good Post JJ.SS. We have 7 children and the last one is 6 as well. we've cussed and discussed the prepping for children thing for the last 10 years theres a couple things we have figured out:
1. Kids can adapt to anything.......... If you will let them by not influnencing them with your Biases.
2. Include them in every prep you make from cleaing fruit jars to buthchering there rabbits Make them see that God put things on earth for our use and eating animals and other things are for us.
3. Enjoy your life and theres as well things can come up and wisk them away quickly or you as well. we don't know that we will survive what comes or them either so Its important to have those memories to cling too in the Dark times..........
Sometimes that alone will Pull you thru, Make sure you have Plenty...........

Good Luck and once a gain a great Post.
 

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Happiness is 2 at low 8
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Good post and great topic... Regarding kids being picky eaters... mostly it's because we allow them that luxury (it's easier to give into their whims than it is to listen to them whine)... When all there is to eat is what's in the bowl in front of them, they'll eat or go hungry a couple days. Unless your child has nutritional/health issues they'll adapt.

Kids don't know much about the world in any event so everything is a challenge, their world is filled with new challenges even in the best of times. Theirs is a world of adapation. They'll adapt to this too. We, who have a traditional view of how things have been and should be, are the ones who'll have difficulty adapting to the new world.

Kids need to know that Mom and Dad are there. That Mom and Dad love them. Beyond that if you meet their needs for food, water, warmth and give them something to do (the older kids would like to feel like they are contributing, that they have a job) then they'll be fine.

In my 7 yr old granddaughter's BOB we have cards, colored pencils (crayons melt), activity books, jump rope and a few other entertainment items. She also has a signal mirror, mini-light sticks, a whistle, ID, a change of clothes, a few dollars, her own toiletries (incl TP), a sleeping bag and 3 days of food and water. It all goes into a school bag with wheels that can be dragged behind her if we wind up having to walk. This gives her a sense of doing for herself, being part of the solution. It gives her something to do, even if it's only practicing with the signal mirror or annoying everyone around her with the whistle. The jumprope gives her something to do physically to let off energy. The book she has to read lets her occupy herself when we've had enough of her annoying everyone around her.

In your case I suspect the 6 yr old could do a good job of looking after the 2 yr old, at least on a limited basis, while the adults are doing other things.

Good luck. You're off to a great start.

Allan
 

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Fubar Artist
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
In my 7 yr old granddaughter's BOB we have cards, colored pencils (crayons melt), activity books, jump rope and a few other entertainment items. She also has a signal mirror, mini-light sticks, a whistle, ID, a change of clothes, a few dollars, her own toiletries (incl TP), a sleeping bag and 3 days of food and water. It all goes into a school bag with wheels that can be dragged behind her if we wind up having to walk. This gives her a sense of doing for herself, being part of the solution. It gives her something to do, even if it's only practicing with the signal mirror or annoying everyone around her with the whistle. The jumprope gives her something to do physically to let off energy. The book she has to read lets her occupy herself when we've had enough of her annoying everyone around her.
good stuff there...

Books, coloring gear, toys and security items - Gotta see what I can pull together- keeping them occupied is a good thing! Thanks!
 

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I think it depends on your lifestyle to begin with. Some families live a very luxurious life, new everything, McD's all the time and are 'allowed' to be fussy with foods. Those kids and their parents will find it difficult.
If you live a simplified life now, then the transition won't be too hard. I was speaking to a woman just last week who was born during the Depression. It was just life and while it was hard, thats just the way it was.
One thing I did learn during 9-1-1, was the impact on my daughter who was 4 at the time. We were watching the events on tv as they unfolded. Soon after my father was scheduled for surgery in our local small city hosp..which has 6 floors. As we were approaching the hosp. from the parking lot, to go visit my dad, she looks at it and says to me "Will this building fall down like the one on Tv?" That broke my heart...but it didn't make her afraid of hosps. Soon after, we were visiting not only that hosp. again to see her new little brother, but 2 weeks after his birth, we were in a big Univ.hosp. for a serious life threatening sudden surgery with her older sister.
Depending on the event, the main thing is to make it that this is just normal life and not to be too panicked yourself. Just a 'glitch' in life at times. Kids are usually quite resilient. I think a lot of the factors involved is how well the parents react. If they freak out, the kids will too.
 
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