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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys!

The next addition to my preps will be a new kerosene heater aaand Dietz lamps. I plan on ordering the lamps early next week and going to the local hardware store for the heater. My question is just how long will kerosene last if stored in a basement in the dark? I feel very safe having this type of fuel stored in my basement as it is very stable hell you can put a match out in the stuff... lol. I will have to buy the 10 liter containers from the local hardware store because kerosene is not sold at thru gas pumps anymore in this area.
 

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Storyteller
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1,773 Posts
In a sealed container, it should be good for decades.

I don't store liquid fuel in my home. It's against local code. You might want to check local laws and with your insurance agent - assuming you have property insurance.

I'd hate to see a claim denied because you stored the kero indoors.
 

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Livin' the Dream!
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Good luck with your insurance company if you're storing 10 liter containers of kerosene in your basement.

As far as putting out a match in it goes, just remember, the reason you're storing kerosene in the first place is because it's flammable (says so right on the container) and you plan on burning it!

I store my kerosene in an unheated outdoor shed. As long as the containers aren't compromised, kerosene will probably outlast you!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info guy! Sometimes I really need to stop and think things through before acting. Thanks for bringing up the insurance part because I never even thought about it. Think I am going to store it in the unheated detached garage. I figured it would last awhile if unopened but had no idea it would last 10+ years!

Once I have the heater at home I will want to try it out, of course! Once I try it out should I drain the kerosene out of the heater, or sill it be ok to store with it in it!
 

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Burn the kerosene out or drain it if you only test it. The tank can condensate and gain a good deal of moisture content. Moisture will foul the wic as it passes thru. Also, have some good, new wics stored away as well as research "dry burning" to stretch the life of each wic.
 

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Good luck with your insurance company if you're storing 10 liter containers of kerosene in your basement.

As far as putting out a match in it goes, just remember, the reason you're storing kerosene in the first place is because it's flammable (says so right on the container) and you plan on burning it!

I store my kerosene in an unheated outdoor shed. As long as the containers aren't compromised, kerosene will probably outlast you!
Kerosene is not flammable it is combustible, gasoline is flammable. Difference is the flash point.
 

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reluctant sinner
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K heaters are ok, they stink bad when they run out of fuel while working. Sealed cans will store for a very long time. Keep them from rusting threw from the outside. I much prefer a propane heater, they stink less. Understand all the fueled heaters consume oxygen and can produce carbon monoxide, fresh air make up is required. A carbon monoxide detector alarm is a good plan. +1 for lots of spare wicks.
 

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Storyteller
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Thanks for the info guy! Sometimes I really need to stop and think things through before acting. Thanks for bringing up the insurance part because I never even thought about it. Think I am going to store it in the unheated detached garage. I figured it would last awhile if unopened but had no idea it would last 10+ years!

Once I have the heater at home I will want to try it out, of course! Once I try it out should I drain the kerosene out of the heater, or sill it be ok to store with it in it!

Tell you what - this guy has THE canon on kero heaters

http://www.endtimesreport.com/kerosene_heaters.html

Take the time to read the site completely through more than once, this site is the densest, information rich site as I have seen on the web.
The site host guy deals in kero heater spare parts, so he knows his stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes a cracked window in a few places and carbon monoxide detectors are a must! My parents used a kerosene heater in our basement when I was around 5 years old , I remember it heated the entire basement very well with very minimal smell upon lighting and shutdown. While the unit was running it gave off zero smell and was over 30 years ago! No matter how safe any gas heater is I would never leave one unattended while running.
 

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Many people store 275 gallons of #2 fuel oil in their basement in a tank, so if you use an approved tank like this, you should be able to store with no insurance concerns.
 

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LEGAL citizen
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Kerosene is an oil, not a volatile fuel, so it is much safer to store. It is not explosive.

Kerosene can be stored for many years without significant degradation.

Kerosene is a dense store of energy - 1 gallon contains about 134,000 btus of energy (almost 50% more than a gallon of propane)

* get you a kerosene stove as well for backup cooking or if you have to go on the road.
 

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I still have my Y2K supply of kerosene outside in an unheated shed in a variety of plastic and steel 5 gal containers. One of those containers is now open and I used it just fine in my kerosene heater last winter. I'm still keeping these containers as a backup heat source to be used in a couple of space heaters, no plans to use up the old stuff if I don't need to.
 

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To the surface!
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I recommend getting the fuel in a metal can instead of the plastic containers which I have found can have problems with evaporation - especially the cheap one gallon containers which seem about as thin as a milk jug.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for the info everyone! I found 5gal metal pails of 1K low odour triple filtered kerosene at our local hardware store. Well, didn't really find it had to ask and they had to order it because they don't sell enough. However, the owner said he is going to start keeping at least two can on the shelves.
 
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