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My dad gave me a kerosene heater thats about the size of a 13 gallon trash can, it runs off kerosene. If i light it outside and let the initial smell of lighting it go away, is it safe to bring inside the house.

I could probably cook off it cause its got wire all the way around it. could at least make some jiffy pop or something with it.
 

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Not without ventilation. I'd venture to say it would set off a CO detector in short order. You are still burning a fuel for heat so there are still combustion gases being released. They have nowhere to go but into the room with those unvented heaters.

Now with monitoring and ventilation... maybe... but that kinda defeats the purpose if you have to have a window or door open when it's cold out.
 

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Yes, but only if you set it next to a window that has been opened an inch or 2.

I have done this: we ran it during the day and set it next to the kitchen window. It raised the indoor temperature from over 30 degrees to about 65 degrees, but only In the kitchen.

We took off our winter coats and wore light sweaters and socks. And, we boiled some canned ravioli on the wire rack on top.

We absolutely did NOT run it at night. Pets have been known to run and play and bump into things
 

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2nd Amendment zealot
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My dad gave me a kerosin heater thats about the size of a 13 gallon trash can, it runs off kerosin. If i light it outside and let the initial smell of lighting it go away, is it safe to bring inside the house. i could probably cook off it cause its got wire all the way around it. could at least make some jiffy pop or something with it.
Check out this site. It has some good information on operating your heater safely indoors. FWIW, I have the same heater you have for my garage but since I have a fireplace I also have CM detectors through out the house.

http://www.iii.org/article/kerosene-heater-safety
 

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We used a kerosene heater to heat our house for years .
In the 70s there where no CO detectors but we had the heater in the main part of the house.
I don't like the smell much but don't like to freeze .
I know a lot of people use the heater in side.
 

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"Everbody has a plan . .&quot
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They can't be TOO dangerous or idiot proof . . .

Back when I was a L.E.O. it seemed like every trailor park domestic we responded to in the Winter had at least one in every room going full blast. If it was 22 degrees outside at 1 a.m. it felt like 92 inside & those places always reeked of kerosene, stale beer, marijuana, toe jam , & cat pee with a Rebel flag or two on the wall and it was always so hot you could barely even breathe, but I never saw anyone die from one.
Of course, it IS almost impossible to kill a drunk Redneck.
 

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I've used a Kerosene heater the last two years with absolutely no problems, there is an odour for a few minutes after lighting it and after extinguishing it, and I do both while inside. I don't crack a window, my CO monitor has never gone off. I've burned (accidentally) dyed kerosene and didn't die, it just soots up the wick faster. Heck, I've even burned diesel in it, at 100 % concentration. Didn't die from that either, it just gunked up the wick badly, keep it to 25% diesel and it'll run fine.
(To those who doubt this, MSDS' show Kerosene and Diesel are the same thing.)
I also fill them inside, and have occasionally filled them while they are on. Yes, I know that practice can end badly but it all comes down being careful.
My heater can take my livingroom from upper 40s to oppressively hot in 15 minutes, keep my entire house comfortable when I don't "zone heat".

I advise keeping a fire extinguisher nearby at all times, (I've got two) the one local fire I've heard about happened when someone did what I've done and refilled their heater while it was on/hot. Her little hovel didn't take long to burn to the ground.
 

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Diesel and kerosene are NOT the same thing. Kerosene heater have been used for over 100 years and are safe. Most home are not air tight. A window slightly opened is good insurance. If it is modern then it has a fiberglass wick and to clean let it burn out all its fuel. Some alcohol in the fuel is a good idea. Start up and shut down outside is a good idea to reduce to soot/smell level. Temp will slowly increase for the first half an hour or so. They are basically a giant center draft lamp. Good clean fuel is the most important.
 

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I've run my kerosene heater in the garage, and despite adequate ventilation, still gives me headaches. So no chance I'm bringing it inside.
 

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Safety is a spotty thing when you refer to something holding a bunch of highly flammable fluids.

In an emergency it can be used, but things that use fire have three basic needs to work

Heat, Fuel, and Oxygen.

With that in mind after starting it the fuel starts to burn, this leaves Oxygen being consumed.

Also you need to consider what exhaust the kerosene is putting out.

The main issue is the carbon monoxide. I suggest you install a CO detector too before using if you don't already have one.

So while it is likely not going to kill you if you use it for a short time, it is definitely not all too safe for indoor use.

If it had an air intake you want to connect that to outside your house and make sure it won't be obstructed by snow. If you have an exhaust output you want to connect that outside the house to somewhere that is not near the intake source. If you have a picture of the heater more specific info can be given.

There are also things called fume hoods that could be useful not only for this but also other DIY projects.

It is not unsafe, but safe may not be the right word. If installed correctly it would not be unsafe to use correctly.

However anytime there is fuel within your living space it could be a fire risk.

It may also be against your local building codes. Check them out before you install anything. It may also invalidate your home insurance.



"Fire Departments: It may be useful to contact your local fire department at their nonemergency telephone number to find out what their response will be to a CO alarm in a residence. Your local fire department may also offer free home fire safety inspections that would include checks of potentially CO-generating equipment." - from http://www.carbonmonoxidekills.com/carbon-monoxide-advice/

This is no little thing, it is like asking how your gun barrel should be cleaned. The wrong advice could kill you.\


People rarely ask how to correct internal bleeding and surgery methods but they will ask for advice about something that kills just as many people.

You get medical advice from a doctor or other health practitioner.

You should be getting advice on heating systems from a HVAC certified person or applicable engineer.

caveat emptor.
 

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Tactical Tinkerer
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K-1 kero,no 1 diesel,and jet-A are basicly the same.The only difference is the level of filtration it goes thru,at least that is what my fuel distributer told me,and he sells all 3.K-1 is the dirtyest, followed by #1 diesel,and then jet-A which is the cleanest.A friend of mine was an AP at Toledo Express Airport when we lived in toledo.He would bring the drain samples from the aircraft hoe and run it in his heater in his shop.
 

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Diesel and kerosene are NOT the same thing. Kerosene heater have been used for over 100 years and are safe. Most home are not air tight. A window slightly opened is good insurance. If it is modern then it has a fiberglass wick and to clean let it burn out all its fuel. Some alcohol in the fuel is a good idea. Start up and shut down outside is a good idea to reduce to soot/smell level. Temp will slowly increase for the first half an hour or so. They are basically a giant center draft lamp. Good clean fuel is the most important.
"Kerosene is a lighter diesel oil than #2, hence why it is designated as #1 diesel. The lighter weight means it contains slightly less energy – about 135,000 BTU per gallon vs. 139,000 BTU for a gallon of #2."

I submit they are functionally the same, here is a two page discussion on the subject.
 

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The dangers are CO gas and fire. With a working CO detector, CO is no longer a problem.

Modern kerosene heaters keep the flame well shielded inside the unit and they shut off if the unit tips over. There is a small risk of fire but not more than you'd have with a fire place and lots of people use a fire place.

I have several as emergency heat and have gotten them out a few times in the last 20 years. No problems.
 

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All the risks are mentioned abowe, I grew up with an Aladdin heater :https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2546/4092726753_4e49c2d548_b.jpg
and we did always turn it off before we went to sleep, it will always need a sudden amount of air, so the room should not be to small, a good trick is to have a candle burning, if the candle not are running well, it is absolutely time for some fresh air.

We ended up with a routine of heating up an empty room to pretty hot, moving out the burner and ventilate with a fully opened window for a short time, closing it and the room stayed comfortable for some time.

dsk
 

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Molon Labe
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My parents have used them since I was 7. Keep a window cracked and don't let anything flammable be near them. I've even had them left running overnight on a few really cold nights but that was rare.
 

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I've used kerosene heaters for years, both the type you have and the smaller reflector type. It isn't necessary to open a window since they don't give off enough toxic gases to kill a mouse. They can smell bad if you burn it with a bad wick or light/extinguish it indoors, but if you can stand the smell and don't mind some soot, even then they aren't dangerous. All of the modern ones have a safety shutoff if they tilt even a little bit. The only things you must be careful about - keeping it a safe distance from anything flammable and NOT filling it while it is still hot or burning (although I've even done the latter a few times, VERY carefully and always outside). Always keep an extra wick (or 2 or 3) handy and keep your burner clean. You'll be glad you did.

BTW - cooking on them is a bad idea. Anything boils over or spills and you can have a fire very quickly. That wire cage around it is to keep you (and your kids/pets/spouse/whomever) from touching the burner and burning yourself, NOT to cook on.

As for the white verses the pink kero, the pink is a dye added to differentiate between taxed and non-taxed fuels. They are basically the same thing. I've used both and never seen any difference. There are however two GRADES of kerosene, K-1 and K-2. The difference is the sulfur content. NEVER burn K-2 in your kerosene heater.
 
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