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Observer
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What warm kit would you pack in a B O B... are those rechargable gel hand warmers good for packing, how many layers...

Your opinions on cold weather bug out gear! :thumb:
 

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I think those gel handwarmer don't last for very long, some only for 20 mins, although you can reheat them. The heat pads that you can buy for pain relief last a few hours but can't be reused, both of those are cheap, unbulky options. Ive also used mini hot water bottles, which can last a good while and you can re cycle the water in them. I tend to go for lots of thin layers of clothes, I work outdoors and you can never be too prepared for cold weather in my opinion. Thermals are thin and comfy, you can double them up. The main thing I have noticed is to make sure you wear breathable fabrics cos if you are wearing alot of clothes and start to sweat you will have problems. I havent tried them yet but I am going to include foil blankets in my pack, Ive seen them used a lot by the first aiders in my job ( im in security; concerts, football games etc) so I figured they are worth a shot.
 

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On the lake
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Some of the gel handwarmers say they last up to 2 hours. The thin metallic emergency blankets are also great like eschara said. They are compact and reflect about 80% of body heat. They also make emergency sleeping bags out of the same material as the emergency blankets. A wool blanket is always a good idea as well.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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My cold weather isn't like your cold weather since I'm down in the south. But I carry cold weather clothing layers. I have a few handwarmers in the bag too, but the long johns, thermal socks and gloves, and balaclava and thinsulate beanie will be more than enough here.

I think cold weather should always be addressed at the clothing level first, with everything else simply as comfort items.
 

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I have control issues
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I have some of the chemical hand and body warmers (NOT the gel ones) in my packs. These do work well...I use them in winter when out deer hunting. I also keep a couple of the mylar emergency blankets in my pack, as well as several different methods to start a fire, and a "pocket cooker" to heat up water or food (warming up your INSIDES helps a lot). I also have a pair of thermal "long underwear", wool socks, and wool shirt or sweater, a military poncho liner, and an ECWS (Extreme Cold Weather Sleeping) system that consists of two sleeping bags (one lighter, one heavier) that can be used either separately or combined, plus a gore-tex bivy cover that is waterproof and provides an additional thermal layer.
 

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Darting from the shadows
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I tend to stay warm when everyone else is freezing.
But saying that I have had moderate hypothermia before and now I dress warmer and keep more aware for the signs.
Our cold weather here would be down to -10'C (about 14'F) and then whatever the windchill.
On trips in the mountains, that has added up to -25'C for me.

But to answer your question, thermals/ long sleeve shirt/ warmth layers, say polar fleece vest and woolen jumper/ wind rain blocking jacket and that keeps my core warm at all times.
I find with this lot I can wear just the jacket and thermal top when walking and be quite comfortable.
A huge sapper of heat and energy is the wind, keep it away as much as possible by wearing a hat, gloves, over pants and jacket and you'll find it so much easier to keep what warmth you have.

When in my -10 comfort rated sleeping bag, a small hot water bottle is brilliant.
I tried the warmers but found they didn't last long enough whereas with the refillable hot water bottle, once it has cooled off, you can refill it with fresh hot water and your still getting the benifit from it.
 
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Solid fuel hand warmers are fairly convenient. They have a charcoal like stick that burns for "up to" 8 hrs. (thus claims the maker) I break them to length for the time I plan to be out because I'm not really sure how to extinguish them. I always carry spare sticks and they don't need much special care. There is a little bit of a smokey smell from them, but they make a LOT of heat.
You do need matches or a lighter to start them.
 

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I'd like to add...high calorie food snacks. It keeps the 'internal fires' stoked.

My preference is Clif Bars™ and nuts, but anything similar would work. I'd stay away from pure sugar items, generally speaking, as you need some complex carbos to keep things humming along nicely.

Make sure you drink water, too. It's part of the equation. I find that 'not cold' is better in this circumstance. I keep a small water bottle on the inside layers so it is at body temperature.
 

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pack light, move quietly.
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Start thinking Carhart

I used to work in mining, in a plant that never seemed to get warm, washing down most of the time. I found that layers of carhart stuff. Long sleeve T-Shirt, crew neck sweat shirt, over sized hoody, carhart vest, thermals, and carhart carpenter pants. All layered up and easy to adjust for exertion or higher temps. There is higher tech stuff out there, but I'm not sure there is much more effective stuff out there. Another nice thing about Carhart clothes, where I am at least, is that everybody wears it, and it just doesn't stand out.

Thanks,
Rob
 

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My layers on my body, closes to body first: long underwear, t shirt, hooded sweatshirt (you'd be surprised how warm the hood keeps your neck, head, and therefore the rest of the body), coat.

While camping in the winter, I use a 20F sleeping bag, long underwear, coat, heat, gloves. 2 pairs of socks also while sleeping (not while walking). The inner pair should be a wicking type, the outer pair should be wool.

Wool blankets on top of the bag also help. A balaclava helps in really cold weather.
 

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On the lake
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I'd like to add...high calorie food snacks. It keeps the 'internal fires' stoked.

My preference is Clif Bars™ and nuts, but anything similar would work. I'd stay away from pure sugar items, generally speaking, as you need some complex carbos to keep things humming along nicely.

Make sure you drink water, too. It's part of the equation. I find that 'not cold' is better in this circumstance. I keep a small water bottle on the inside layers so it is at body temperature.
Excellent points - thanks.
 

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Homesteader
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+1 on the carharts. For the last couple of years, I have worked outside at night at a local dairy. When it is -20 and you will spend the next 8-10 hours ouside in it, you learn to stay warm. Sorel packboots with 2 pair of wool thermal socks, longjohns, with a light pair of sweats, under your insulated bibs, thermal shirt, long sleeve flannel or other heavy material, light hooded jacket, heavy carhart hooded coat.

Good thinsulate leather gloves, and a stocking cap with face mask, sometimes another regular stocking cap on top of that.

Layers are key, since you can take off the top one and do whatever needs doing that you can't do with all the bulk. It was usually pulling a calf where I needed to be bit more dexterous.

A lot of times I would go home covered in all kinds of slime and muck, but still was warm.
 

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I can't say much for those warming packs, but I can say what I do.

In the winter (I work an outdoor job) I layer like mad. In the recent snow here, as an example, I wore a pair of leggings plus a pair of trousers. One vest, one t-shirt, one jumper, one light jacket and one heavy waterproof coat. I had four pairs of gloves for all situations that might occur to me. One fingerless, one fingered, one both, one double.

There is a great saying that I abide by in my life. "There is no such thing as bad weather, there is only the wrong clothes." If you plan for everything you will fail at nothing.

Plan for the worst where you are. Rain, snow, cold, plan for it. If you have too many clothes you may look like an idiot until you need them, and then everyone will understand you are not mad, but prepared. It happened to me at my work just in this last month with the cold and snow. Everyone else was freezing and I had to explain why I wasn't. They think I am smart and prepared. Next year they will not be cold.
 

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Wasteland Wanderer
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Those foil emerg blankets (the one time use ones) probably saved my life one early May morning being utterly unprepared on the shores of lake Huron. However, make sure you have a change of clothes in the morning because you *will* sweat, and cold sweat in the morning is just as dangerous as not insulating enough at night.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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It does not get very cold here. Last winter we saw 2 weeks that dipped to -40, so it really does not get bad.

I am a fan of wool.

Before the industrial revo, this area had a bunch of wool mills, everyone wore wool and it was cheap.

I wear wool pants, wool shirts, wool sweaters, wool socks, wool mittens, and a wool cap. I have no problem snowshoeing or skiing like this.

So long as it does not get seriously cold, wool is all you really need.

Now if it did begin to get really cold, then I could see adding a layer of fur. But so long as it stays above -50 wool is all you need.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Solid fuel hand warmers are fairly convenient. They have a charcoal like stick that burns for "up to" 8 hrs. (thus claims the maker) I break them to length for the time I plan to be out because I'm not really sure how to extinguish them. I always carry spare sticks and they don't need much special care. There is a little bit of a smokey smell from them, but they make a LOT of heat.
You do need matches or a lighter to start them.
I have one of those also. I don't like to carry it because of the odor the burning fuel makes. Mine came with a case to put it in to smother it. You can relight what's left of the fuel stick. If you don't have the case with yours, you could probably improvise something to cut off the air.
 

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As an Alopecia sufferer Im pretty good at keeping warm. Heres some helpful tips:

Wear multiple layers - underwear, tshirt, jumper/sweater, cardigans, then hats (even indoors), gloves, socks, warm boots.

You mostly feel the cold around the wrists, ankles and back of the neck, so try to keep these covered.

Eat a good carb based diet, more so when its cold, as you use more when your trying to keep warm. Dont eat cold food, as this makes you colder as the body has to worm it up first.

Drink plenty of hot drinks and those that dont dyhydrate you.

I have a cold weather mask, thats good down to -40, but if you dont have Asthma like I do, try to breath through your nose, it stops the cold getting in and dehydration.

With Hypothermia, you will shiver and then stop, if you arent warm, then you need to act fast. Have hot drinks, get a hot water bottle (you can get little ones now) and place on your stomach wrapped in some cloth.

Thermal fleece is quite good, I got a few metres of Ebay and made a snug for the sofa, my Dad swears by it, and even takes it to bed with him. His 82 years old.

Natural blend wools are brilliant, such as Lambs Wool, Cashmere and Angora. Always test the scratch factor of anything you buy against the back of the hand. There is nothing worse then itching from the wool.

If all else fails, stuff your clothes with newspaper.

PS Also anything quilted, especially patcwork quilts, are extremely warm, so a good skill to learn.
 

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It does not get very cold here. Last winter we saw 2 weeks that dipped to -40, so it really does not get bad.

I am a fan of wool.

Before the industrial revo, this area had a bunch of wool mills, everyone wore wool and it was cheap.

I wear wool pants, wool shirts, wool sweaters, wool socks, wool mittens, and a wool cap. I have no problem snowshoeing or skiing like this.

So long as it does not get seriously cold, wool is all you really need.

Now if it did begin to get really cold, then I could see adding a layer of fur. But so long as it stays above -50 wool is all you need.
You are so funny! Here in the southern US 50 is chilly. 30 means we walk around the house shivering. If I experienced -50 I would be frozen solid. My heat pump is sat at 67 and I'm sitting here with wool socks, sweat pants under my night gown and a wool poncho as a sweater AND I'm still cold. You would probably think it was summer. Then again, when it's 100 in the summer I'm starting to get warm and you'd probably be miserable. I guess it's all in what we are used to.
 
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