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Cold Water Kayaker
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Kayak for a BOV?

Anyone have or plan to use a kayak for a BOV. I live in Maine in a populated area and with the road system and ONE large draw bridge I have to cross to get to any main highway makes bugging out an issue. I however live 300+ yards from the ocean which of course has multiple islands both inhabited and uninhabited within a 15 minute or 6 hour paddle. I am a 'newbie' to this forum and what it represents so I am asking for opinions, advice and anything else someone may have to offer on a Kayak BOV. I have two 17' extremely seaworthy boats and am an experienced kayaker.....even Winter kayaking which is my personal favorite.

I'd really appreciate the help!

I tried doing a search in the forums as to not duplicate another thread.
 

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Being a big time Yaker I think I will tackle this one...

Yes it might be a great way to Bug Out. They ae cheap, a least more so than a boat, they are more portable, at least more so than a boat, and they can traverse water ways that most boats cant! That being said, the weight capacities that the manufactures use to rate thier Yaks are pretty generous a best in my opinion. Consider this long and hard. I find that a Yak rated at 275 is more realistically a 200-210 lbs capacity. If your going in the ocean or big water Lakes I would seriously consider a Hobie with a Mirage Drive unit on it. Consider the hull shape too if going out on large open lakes and the ocean. Due to the capacity issue I would seriously consider a cheap Yak such as the Pelican Pursuit with a skirt to tow behind my main Yak to hold all my gear. This will allow you to easily tow a good 200 lbs of gear and keep it dry. Plan on using dry bags for all your gear. There are a number of very good Yaks that would be good for this. Many which can be rigged to be an effceint "fishing machine" on top of that.

I do a lot of fishing from mine, and its a blast. I have found my ak to be a great fishing machine allowing me to silently reach untapped fishing areas that most boats cant reach or reach without spooking the fish. Mine has 4 rod holders installed, Fish Finder with GPS, a battery to run it for about 24 hours, space for a milk crate to carry misc fishing gear and accessories, space below deck will easily hold 4 large Catfishing rods with reels that hold 300 yards of 30 lbs test, spare paddle and safety gear, all easily accessable from the forward hatch that can be reached even while out on the water.

On another note, the Hobies are pretty pricey at first glance but when you consider the features that come with it standard, they are really only a couple of hundred more than a comperable paddle Yak. In addition there are a huge number of accessories available for them such as a Sail kit, Sun-Berella to keep the sun off you just to name a couple. They have a new model out that is in high demand although a bit heavy called the Pro Agler. It is a workl of art for the fisherman and have a weight capacity of about 500 lbs which means it should easily handle close to 400 lbs of weight and gear. Not sure how it handles in the water though but a lot of coastal fisherman that fish in the ocean are pouncing on these as fast as Hobie can make them!!!
 

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I'd use a canoe instead. One man can easily carry one and it does hold alot more supplies and gear. You can also tip it on its side and sleep under it. A kayak is pretty good as well but your limited as to what you can take. I take it from your name that your from maine? A canoe or kayak would be a very good way to get out of sight and into the wilderness up there.
 

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Cold Water Kayaker
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks.
Yah, I know there is a weight issue for a BOK but it seems that, considering where I am located, the water is the easiest way to go for me on very short notice. The many small islands all along the coast make for easy refuge. I could even make it to Monhegan (12 miles out) and since I lived there at one time I think I'd be welcomed back. (makes note to call people). Hell, I could paddle all the way to Canada by island hopping and not be seen. Given a little more advance warning I would pack both kayaks on the truck and head way up North.

I am really not familiar enough with a canoe at this point to consider it as a water escape method. Yes it can hold more gear but I don't think I'd want to be a few miles out to sea in one with the wind blowing 30 and 5 foot seas.....or more. ...at night. I'm well versed in a kayak and can handle bad but not severe conditions.

I think advance caches on islands would lighten my load a little. Very light camping gear is a must and a BOB that is well thought out is an absolute necessity. I have a Glock that will fire underwater if I have to and I'm soon making a waterproof PVC case for my Mossberg 590A1. Getting that out in a moments notice won't be easy unless someone has a really good way to pack one on the side of a kayak.
 

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Experiment 626
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I have given a lot of thought to it also, since I am an avid kayaker. However, after much consideration, I don't know if it would be a good idea.

On water, you are a sitting duck. A kayaker is totally helpless against any form of motorboat.. or even a jet ski.

I have a fast kayak designed for ocean trips that only weighs 45 pounds... But even a fast kayaker will not cover more than 15-20 miles in a day. Waterways will be swarming with motorboaters in a shtf situation... all of them covering more distance in an hour than you will cover all day.

A kayak to me seems to be a good way to increase your fishing abilities and a way to access better hunting grounds.. but not a good plan for evacuation.

I suppose if I actually left the area, I would throw it on the roof of my vehicle, but I would not leave my vehicle behind and try to make a run for it in my kayak.
 

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Cold Water Kayaker
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@robbiec

You have some valid points.However you have to remember where I live and the geography of the land/water. In a sudden SHTF situation there is no way I am making it across the bridge which given the nature of the SHTF may be in the open position. Even if it's not, it dumps me into the city and I have to traverse those roads in difficult situations. I'm a sitting duck. The other smaller bridge is even clogged at a normal rush hour.

There are 365 islands just in Casco Bay, all within a mile or so. The larger ones are inhabited but there are plenty that are not. Up the coast are many isolated islands and mainland areas. (The Maine Coast is rugged). Unlike Florida there isn't a great deal of water craft on the water even in Summer and in a SHTF situation I'm sure the ones that are will be heading for shore to check families, not heading out. In Fall/Winter/Spring the waters are virtually mine.

I could take my chances being stuck in an urban traffic gridlock where I am an easy target but for my situation I think the ocean is the way to go in a SUDDEN SHTF scenario.

Anyone else out there preparing like this?
 

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Experiment 626
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Must be nice to have the waters to yourself for so many months! Down here in Florida, there are so many boaters that the only way to get the water to yourself is to go out during a hurricane! :)

Our situations are totally different it seems.. I am unfamiliar with Maine. I am sitting here at work at the moment, and there are two vehicles outside my window loaded with kayaks.... and it is raining.
 

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Kayak should be OK. Even though you are trying to be discret, purchase a fiberglass whip and flag IF you do not already have one. People will be stressed and pay poor attention to the channel. People will not hassle you, a kayak would not have much to offer someone. A large slow moving boat may have plenty to offer.

Looking into water based plans here. Live on big island with few ways out on land. With a close knit group of islands, a 16ft rowboat and outboard would be the best idea. You can take a log and drag it onto shore and hide the vessel. A drop in keel and rudder might be a handy conversion for a limited capability sailboat.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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Thanks.
Yah, I know there is a weight issue for a BOK but it seems that, considering where I am located, the water is the easiest way to go for me on very short notice. The many small islands all along the coast make for easy refuge. I could even make it to Monhegan (12 miles out) and since I lived there at one time I think I'd be welcomed back. (makes note to call people). Hell, I could paddle all the way to Canada by island hopping and not be seen. Given a little more advance warning I would pack both kayaks on the truck and head way up North.

I am really not familiar enough with a canoe at this point to consider it as a water escape method. Yes it can hold more gear but I don't think I'd want to be a few miles out to sea in one with the wind blowing 30 and 5 foot seas.....or more. ...at night. I'm well versed in a kayak and can handle bad but not severe conditions.

I think advance caches on islands would lighten my load a little. Very light camping gear is a must and a BOB that is well thought out is an absolute necessity. I have a Glock that will fire underwater if I have to and I'm soon making a waterproof PVC case for my Mossberg 590A1. Getting that out in a moments notice won't be easy unless someone has a really good way to pack one on the side of a kayak.
I believe you are approaching this decision correctly. Lots of things to consider.

Yes, a human powered watercraft would be very useful in a grid down SHTF crisis.

No, you don't want to be in a canoe at sea (or a large lake) during a storm.

Have you considered powering a light wt row boat (like a punt) with a small gas motor (to get you out of the urban area and away from the crowd) then switch to oars for short range fishing trips once every one else runs out of fuel.

I already own such a boat and I plan to move the gear using an aluminum fishing boat and tow the punt behind me.

But perhaps the best solution for you is to live in an area where you can drive directly to the wilderness.

Where you can load a pickup with your camping gear, food and water filtration, guns and ammo, and your nice kayaks, and you don't have to drive through the crazy urban area.

Move to the wilderness now.
 

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If you're stuck on a kayak, you might try getting a small trawling motor (gas) and rigging one outrigger to your kayak. In any SHTF situation, calories are going to be very important. You're going to burn a day's worth of energy, just getting to your BOL, and that won't include any clearing, scouting, or carrying your craft.
 
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