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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a little review of a recent khukuri I received. A Nepalese custom shop that differs a little from the 1 centimeter thick khukuris many have seen...

The Kailash Khukuri, Historical Service Issue Khukuri. Khukuri is the correct spelling and helps with the pronunciation. I think we westerners have shorted it to kukri, but here is Kailash’s explanation:

You may well have seen khukuri spelt a few different ways.
Within the knife community, the correct way to refer to these blades is a point of some contention. We refer to our knives as khukuris for a few reasons.
Firstly, it allows for the correct pronunciation of what is a Nepalese word. Khoo-koo-ree.
The "H" after the k signifies in Nepali that it as an aspirated constant, so should be pronounced a little bit harder that the second k. The terms khukri and kukri both miss out on the second vowel sound and blend the whole word together.
We use this spelling because we are a predominately Nepalese run company. The only non-Nepali amongst us is our designer Andrew and even he has a bit of Nepalese under his belt.
In a way, the different spellings have over time acquired different meanings, with the Americanized spellings coming to refer more to westernized versions of the blade, from the recurved bowie type blades that go by the same name all the way to mass produced stamped machetes.
We are Nepalese people, making Nepalese knives the Nepalese way.
So we spell it Khukuri.
I ordered the Historical Service Issue: Kailash Historical Service Issue

Historical Service Issue - 11.5"
•Blade Finish:Satin
•Hardware:Steel
•Handle Material:Desert Camo Micarta Wrap $45
•Handle Length:Medium (4.75")
•Sheath:Traditional Dap
•Grind Type:Standard Grind

I ordered on 1 March, and they finished it on 3 April; shipping only took about 7-8 days…not bad at all.

They updated me with pictures with the process of forging, grinding, and the oil quench:





They do offer a custom Kydex sheath which is actually a good way to go if you want to use it more in the field and lashed to your pack. What drew me the most was their micarta-wrapped handle option, something I really want to try out…it was worth it. My sheath didn’t come with the traditional karda and chakmak (smaller accessory blades), but it also meant a thinner sheath, which I wanted.

This is the “stick-tang”, but as you’ll see, they’re not rat-tail size. The Panawal design is the full tang khukuri and I have a couple. They’re heavier and I’ve always found the smaller tangs balanced better and never had any concerns about being a weak-link. My oldest Himalayan Ang Khola khukuri with the buffalo horn handle has done a ton of hard chopping…zero issues.

This is a thinner blade than my others. My buffalo-horn handled khukuri weighs 24.6oz, the Kalish khukuri Is only 17.6oz. This is just a comparison of what I have as I know you can get the thicker blades as they have their own version of the Ang khola.




It feels really light in the hand and you can see the more drastic curve in the handle, which I found really locks your hand in without hindering movements. The micarta wrap is excellent, tactile, and slightly larger in girth, which I like.

Fit and finish is excellent with one exception. I ordered the “satin” blade finish, and I should have went with the polished finished; more of a preference than an issue. I’ve just found the higher polished finishes are easier to maintain, it’s not about looks, just easy of maintenance. The grinds are very symmetrical…better than some production blades I’ve seen.

As you can see, it’s a lighter, thinner khukuri. It won’t be as good of a chopper as the thicker Ang Khola type khukuri, but I wanted a lighter version and didn’t care much for the typical Sirupate styles. More intended for lighter, green vegetation and chopping small wood. I did just a little chopping on some briars and smaller branches; very handy and maneuverable and less fatiguing than the shorter, thicker khukuri.








I will probably pick up another Kailash khukuri, but it will be with a polished blade and likely get a Kydex sheath option as well. The price is reasonable for a traditional, hand-made, custom khukuri and the communications were awesome through the process. Highly recommended if interested...

ROCK6
 

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So they give options of full or rat style tang; you say yours is 'stick'? Is that the full tang?

Anyway, a great post and great info. I've personally always been leary of the native made kukri - whoops - khukuri, but no more. And BONUS: these guys offer a LH sheath.
 

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LOVE that blade of your's !!!

Sorry no pic.

But I ordered a custom from Heritage Knives and its thinner and forged and FAST in the hand.

I wanted it more for martial/social purposes than for a chopper.

Thin,polished,FAST [ oh did I mention fast in hand ].

Do wish it had a kydex sheath,but I think my local maker will take care of me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So they give options of full or rat style tang; you say yours is 'stick'? Is that the full tang?
Yeah, it's not the skinning rat-tail tang, but more of a wide tang that goes to the butt. It's solid and my older HI khukuri has been used hard and I've swung that into hardwood as hard as I can numerous times with zero issues...they're plenty tough. I think my Panawal was from Khukuri-House, but the good ones will taper the tang so it's not as heavy and balances well.

ROCK6
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
LOVE that blade of your's !!!

Sorry no pic.

But I ordered a custom from Heritage Knives and its thinner and forged and FAST in the hand.

I wanted it more for martial/social purposes than for a chopper.

Thin,polished,FAST [ oh did I mention fast in hand ].

Do wish it had a kydex sheath,but I think my local maker will take care of me.
Would like to see a picture when you get a chance. This is the thinnest I own and it's really fast in the hand, something I really like for such a wide blade. It won't chop as well as the thicker, heavier ones, but this is a good compromise.

ROCK6
 

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On the topic of Khukuris, I have a couple of observations: I had a wood handled one purchased in the 80s for about $20, and I used it to chop branches off my tree. I noticed that the wood handle was not comfortable when chopping wood and the wood ring/knotch around the center would dig into the palm and hurt over time and use. Obviously that blade was not in the same category as the quality blades in the above pictures. Most recently, I have had a Cold Steel Khukuri for years and it stays sharp and is comfortable in the hand.
Years back, I had the pleasure of visiting a British Embassy in a certain country and enjoyed some brief chatting with a couple of the Nepalese Ghurka guards there. I noticed that they carry a smaller version of the Khukuri (presumably because of their shorter stature ?) and they carry it on their web gear belt towards the front not on the side.
 

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Years back, I had the pleasure of visiting a British Embassy in a certain country and enjoyed some brief chatting with a couple of the Nepalese Ghurka guards there. I noticed that they carry a smaller version of the Khukuri (presumably because of their shorter stature ?)
I don't know if their is a standardized version of a 'duty' khukuri for the guards but I would be surprised if there wasn't. There are various sizes of these blades in Nepal including some two handed ceremonial blades in which the protagonist is expected to behead a yak/cow with one blow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Years back, I had the pleasure of visiting a British Embassy in a certain country and enjoyed some brief chatting with a couple of the Nepalese Ghurka guards there. I noticed that they carry a smaller version of the Khukuri (presumably because of their shorter stature ?) and they carry it on their web gear belt towards the front not on the side.
I can only think it's more ceremonial? I trained with some Gurkhas in the early 90's and they had the full-size khukuris. The old tradition of giving a khukuri a taste of blood if it's unsheathed was more of a trick on me; yeah, I stupidly cut my hand thinking it was still tradition and the Gurkhas had a good laugh. Fast forward to just a couple years ago, and a small Gurkha contingent did a pretty cool martial arts demonstration with their khukuries when I was working in Northern Afghanistan, also full-size. It seems 10-13" blades are pretty common for the issued versions. While the Gurkha's I talked with said they could purchase the current "issued" versions, many were gifted their khukuri from their family. As with many "issued" items in the military, they're not really "issued", but are personal purchases. Very cool troopers and they have a great sense of humor.

ROCK6
 

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My second Kailash blade was just shipped!! I find their work to be top notch. I have a Knucklebuster on the way. can't wait for it.
 

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I just hit the link and that handle material is now a $60 option. Apparently our money isn't worth as much over there now either.
 

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Just a little review of a recent khukuri I received. A Nepalese custom shop that differs a little from the 1 centimeter thick khukuris many have seen...

The Kailash Khukuri, Historical Service Issue Khukuri. Khukuri is the correct spelling and helps with the pronunciation. I think we westerners have shorted it to kukri, but here is Kailash’s explanation:



I ordered the Historical Service Issue: Kailash Historical Service Issue

Historical Service Issue - 11.5"
•Blade Finish:Satin
•Hardware:Steel
•Handle Material:Desert Camo Micarta Wrap $45
•Handle Length:Medium (4.75")
•Sheath:Traditional Dap
•Grind Type:Standard Grind

I ordered on 1 March, and they finished it on 3 April; shipping only took about 7-8 days…not bad at all.

They updated me with pictures with the process of forging, grinding, and the oil quench:





They do offer a custom Kydex sheath which is actually a good way to go if you want to use it more in the field and lashed to your pack. What drew me the most was their micarta-wrapped handle option, something I really want to try out…it was worth it. My sheath didn’t come with the traditional karda and chakmak (smaller accessory blades), but it also meant a thinner sheath, which I wanted.

This is the “stick-tang”, but as you’ll see, they’re not rat-tail size. The Panawal design is the full tang khukuri and I have a couple. They’re heavier and I’ve always found the smaller tangs balanced better and never had any concerns about being a weak-link. My oldest Himalayan Ang Khola khukuri with the buffalo horn handle has done a ton of hard chopping…zero issues.

This is a thinner blade than my others. My buffalo-horn handled khukuri weighs 24.6oz, the Kalish khukuri Is only 17.6oz. This is just a comparison of what I have as I know you can get the thicker blades as they have their own version of the Ang khola.




It feels really light in the hand and you can see the more drastic curve in the handle, which I found really locks your hand in without hindering movements. The micarta wrap is excellent, tactile, and slightly larger in girth, which I like.

Fit and finish is excellent with one exception. I ordered the “satin” blade finish, and I should have went with the polished finished; more of a preference than an issue. I’ve just found the higher polished finishes are easier to maintain, it’s not about looks, just easy of maintenance. The grinds are very symmetrical…better than some production blades I’ve seen.

As you can see, it’s a lighter, thinner khukuri. It won’t be as good of a chopper as the thicker Ang Khola type khukuri, but I wanted a lighter version and didn’t care much for the typical Sirupate styles. More intended for lighter, green vegetation and chopping small wood. I did just a little chopping on some briars and smaller branches; very handy and maneuverable and less fatiguing than the shorter, thicker khukuri.








I will probably pick up another Kailash khukuri, but it will be with a polished blade and likely get a Kydex sheath option as well. The price is reasonable for a traditional, hand-made, custom khukuri and the communications were awesome through the process. Highly recommended if interested...

ROCK6
Did you ever leave us a link to that maker ??.
 

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