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How do you carry the builk of your water in your BOB type bags?

  • Stainless Steel container

    Votes: 10 23.3%
  • Aluminium Container

    Votes: 1 2.3%
  • Plastic bottle (thin, clear disposable type)

    Votes: 7 16.3%
  • Nalgalene bottle or thicker plastic type bottle

    Votes: 8 18.6%
  • Water bladder

    Votes: 14 32.6%
  • Other (post below)

    Votes: 3 7.0%
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

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Discussion Starter #1
I have always stated I carry (and prefer) stainless steel water bottles, due to the ability of being able to boil water in it, and they fact they dont leech stuff into the water the way aluminum does (dont know what i'm talking about, leave water in an aluminum bottle for 2 years then pour it out, it will be white)

However, I just had a thought, If you took a plastic water bottle as well, you could use it more easily than a steel bottle to filter water with a bandanna, as your able to squeeze the sides of the bottle to force the water through more layers of the bandanna.

Also, you can see through the sides of a clear plastic bottle so you can kinda see how clean/dirty the water is...

But you still cant boil water (safely) in a plastic bottle... hmmm.

I think i'm going to stick with stainless for now.
 

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Maximus
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12,320 Posts
Like having more than one firestarter and knife; I also have more than one water container. Water, fire, and knife are some of the things you should carry multiples of. Mostly in waterbladders, one liter plastic bottle, and one alum canteen.
 

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Spook
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426 Posts
Like having more than one firestarter and knife; I also have more than one water container. Water, fire, and knife are some of the things you should carry multiples of. Mostly in waterbladders, one liter plastic bottle, and one alum canteen.
Yeah having a variety of water containers is better, don't just settle for one type. I answered your poll with a water bladder, Camelbak bladders are the best.
 

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Super Moderator
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I use a combination of hydration bladders, water storage bladders, stainless steel canteens/water bottles, and GI 2-quart poly canteens of two types.
 

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Kibitzer
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USGI 2 qt canteen on ALICE BOB, with USGI 5 qt bladder for later use.
USGI metal and plastic 1 qt canteens on LBE with USGI cups and stove.
Unlike most on here, I can't carry a case of water in my BOB. I'll be using a wagon to haul heavy stuff. I've got gallon jugs and large/small water bottles.
 

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In winter, the SS one filled to 80% so it doesn't break. In summer a water bladder (Camelbak). The SS one is kept in a neopreme sack, so whether filled with cool water or hot coffee, your hands don't get burned or frozen.

Both are in constant use and refilled with filtered water, so I don't need to "see if it's dirty/clean".
 

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Passed away March 22, 2011
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1,298 Posts
I use a mix of water carriers:
1 Qrt Aussie, Brit and US Army plastic canteens
2 Qrt Aussie And US Army collapsible canteens
Hydration bladders
Polycarb bottles

I also use a mix of stainless steel vessels to boil water in:
Dutch Army mess tins
MSR lidded pots
Aussie and US canteen cups
Bottle cups
 

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I’m another one that tends to thing several types should be considered. I do agree that stainless steel is probably better than aluminum, but leaching is not much of a concern for short term for me; it is a good point to avoid storing water in plastic (especially if stored where temperatures vary a lot) or aluminum for long periods of time.

I like Camelback bladders, but I still prefer to use a bottle or canteen to fill them after purification/filtering. Even with a plastic canteen (USGI/NATO), I still recommend a steel nesting cup for boiling water in. I also have both Klean Kanteen’s and the Guyot/Nalgene stainless steel, single wall bottles. These are probably the most versatile, but they can be pretty heavy if you’re a weight-skimping backpacker.

I still carry and use regular water bottles. The only reason is that they can be purchased and thrown in your kit when traveling (especially flying), and they can be purchased in liter sizes, already sized for purification tablets and the universal threads also fit my Aqua Mira Pro filter systems…which work as a gravity or squeeze filter connected directly to the pocket-sized filter.

Nalgene water bottles are still a good addition and can use several types of nesting cups/mugs (GSI, Snow Peak, Vargo, Olicamp, etc.) to boil water or eat out of. For backpacking, I still like and use Nalgene water bottles, but as mentioned, I would definitely go with single-wall, stainless steel bottles for winter use…the neoprene cozy or cover is a good idea for insulation.

I still have and use Army 2qt canteens and another good option is the Platypus collapsible containers (Nalgene makes some nice ones to). Just like Camelback bladders, the Platypus collapsible containers can be carried very compactly, but when needed, can easily fill anywhere from a half-liter up to a gallon or 5 liters.

Water is a necessary essential. You may not always be able to lug around 2-3 gallons, but you should have the ability to filter/purify and store up to that much. For weekend trips or longer, I usually have a Camelback bladder for on-the-go hydration, some type of water bottle (used to filter/purify and fill the bladder or other cooking containers), a collapsible water container (3 quart Nalgene works with my filter) and a small emergency 1-liter Platypus container with my Aqua Mira emergency pocket filter. You can never have too much water, but you can only carry so much so acquiring water, carrying water and filtering water are all important considerations dependent on everybody’s own, unique situations. Great topic!

ROCK6
 

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Tuefel Hunden
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1,573 Posts
I seem to carry alot of water gear, tablets, filters, purifing stuff, etc...I like to drink clean water? I have bladders, canteens, stainless bottles and in the rig just seem to have alot of plastic water bottles!
 

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great survivalist *****
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I have always stated I carry (and prefer) stainless steel water bottles, due to the ability of being able to boil water in it, and they fact they dont leech stuff into the water the way aluminum does (dont know what i'm talking about, leave water in an aluminum bottle for 2 years then pour it out, it will be white)
leave water in any container for two years and its going to be undrinkable in two years. its not the aluminum bottle, its the stuff that "grows" in water after two years.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
leave water in any container for two years and its going to be undrinkable in two years. its not the aluminum bottle, its the stuff that "grows" in water after two years.
I have water that was stored in normal plastic soft drink bottles for about 5 years, and it was not white. It was not drinkable, it had green/black mould on the top of the water, and some in the bottom of the bottle, but it wasnt white.

I am pretty sure the aluminum leeches into the water.

Also, water can be stored in Mylar survival pouches, or the fruit box type containers for longer than 2 years and still be drinkable, though of course that water is specially treated. I have commercial bottled water in my pack that is 3 years old now, and while I dont plan to open it just to check that it is still drinkable, it looks perfectly drinkable from the outside.
 

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pseudo-conformist
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I have always stated I carry (and prefer) stainless steel water bottles, due to the ability of being able to boil water in it, and they fact they dont leech stuff into the water the way aluminum does (dont know what i'm talking about, leave water in an aluminum bottle for 2 years then pour it out, it will be white)

However, I just had a thought, If you took a plastic water bottle as well, you could use it more easily than a steel bottle to filter water with a bandanna, as your able to squeeze the sides of the bottle to force the water through more layers of the bandanna.

Also, you can see through the sides of a clear plastic bottle so you can kinda see how clean/dirty the water is...

But you still cant boil water (safely) in a plastic bottle... hmmm.

I think i'm going to stick with stainless for now.
I'm with you on the stainless dude, but as far as boiling water, a paper cup will do the job as long as the flame is touching the point where water is on the other side. I don't now about the chemicals that might leach in a polystyrene foam cup etc, but I've done it many times. And in a survival situation I'd have no problem doing it again.
Ideally cast iron/steel is the boy to go with, but any port in a storm eh?! :)
 

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Maximus
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12,320 Posts
I have always stated I carry (and prefer) stainless steel water bottles, due to the ability of being able to boil water in it, and they fact they dont leech stuff into the water the way aluminum does (dont know what i'm talking about, leave water in an aluminum bottle for 2 years then pour it out, it will be white)

However, I just had a thought, If you took a plastic water bottle as well, you could use it more easily than a steel bottle to filter water with a bandanna, as your able to squeeze the sides of the bottle to force the water through more layers of the bandanna.

Also, you can see through the sides of a clear plastic bottle so you can kinda see how clean/dirty the water is...

But you still cant boil water (safely) in a plastic bottle... hmmm.

I think i'm going to stick with stainless for now.
I am pretty sure the aluminum leeches into the water.


A few notables. Aluminum doesn't leech stuff with the water as much as it has a chemical reaction once it's protective layer gets damaged. Once aluminum touches air, it almost immediatly oxidizes to form a protective layer. That layer protects alum from reacting with water. But if you left it for 2 years, that protective layer may have reacted away with some of the other metals in the water. Once that it done, it can form hydrogen and/or hydrochloric acid. But it takes a long long time for this to happen (like you said, about 2 years). I wouldn't store water in alum canteens but I would have no problems using it because once you do, it repairs that oxidized layer right away. So "leeching" is a little inaccurate and won't happen until the protective layer is damaged for prolonged periods.

Another thing about plastic containers is that you can acutally use clear plastic containers to disinfect water. You still need to filter it, but once filtered, leaving it in direct sunlight for a few days will make the water safe to drink. Google SODIS to read up on this.
 

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Kibitzer
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I have commercial bottled water in my pack that is 3 years old now, it looks perfectly drinkable from the outside.
Did they hold their shape?? Mine look like someone squeezed some water out and put lid back on while squeezing bottle. But lid is still intact.
 

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Maximus
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Did they hold their shape?? Mine look like someone squeezed some water out and put lid back on while squeezing bottle. But lid is still intact.
I have one also in my bag. It looks like a squished pancake lol Some water bottles are thicker than others though.
 

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Stuck in the City...
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i have my camelbak 2 plastic canteens, and my water filter.. i think one quart.
my dog has two small bladders in her pack as well.
 
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