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Prepared not crazy.
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I hear a lot about stocking beans, what kind do you stock and how much per person? What’s the best bang for the buck? And how would you prepare them as a daily food source.

Beans are just a part of a food supply but let’s keep this thread mostly about beans.
 

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I get pinto beans and black beans from Sam's club. I think the pinto beans run about $6.00 for a 10lb bag and black might be about $9.00 for a 10lb bag (if I remember correctly). Unfortunately that is it for beans at my Sam's club. I am planning to get one of those cooking with beans cookbooks because I don't know what I'd do with those. I have make Navy bean soup before that was pretty good. I would like to stock up on those but I want to find them in bulk locally first.
 

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I store beans as they serve dual purpose.

I can cook them (boil) or grind them and boil or use as a supplement in other grinned seeds. Water after boiling can be used to make a stew or a drink.

Secondary purpose is that I can plant them. They grow pretty easy and as a bonus they do enrich soil.

As for specifics, like what sort of beans. I am trying to store as many as I can:
lima, pinta, brown, black, russian black and etc.
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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I get pinto beans and black beans from Sam's club. I think the pinto beans run about $6.00 for a 10lb bag and black might be about $9.00 for a 10lb bag (if I remember correctly). Unfortunately that is it for beans at my Sam's club. I am planning to get one of those cooking with beans cookbooks because I don't know what I'd do with those. I have make Navy bean soup before that was pretty good. I would like to stock up on those but I want to find them in bulk locally first.
Don't feel bad; my Sam's doesn't stock any dried beans (I've asked).

I have bought white navy beans and pinto beans from Aldi's. They come in 2# bags, but they're about as cheap as you can find even in bulk.

I've stocked white navy, pinto, red, and black beans. I've also stocked split peas and lentils.
 
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Adventurer
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I absolutely love Navy Bean soup. Mmmm. And pinto beans at Sam's. I don't know of many other recipes besides some seasonings and boiling them. I'm not the chef though.
 

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I store beans as they serve dual purpose.

I can cook them (boil) or grind them and boil or use as a supplement in other grinned seeds. Water after boiling can be used to make a stew or a drink.

Secondary purpose is that I can plant them. They grow pretty easy and as a bonus they do enrich soil.

As for specifics, like what sort of beans. I am trying to store as many as I can:
lima, pinta, brown, black, russian black and etc.
This may be a dumb question but: you can grow dried beans?
 

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Yes, you can grow them and you let them dry on the vine. As a little experiment, I tried some Jacob's cattle beans. They grew wonderfully and were speckled just like cows.
 

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Standing Vigilant
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Found some info on the net from a large catering company that routinely cooks beans etc... for large groups.
They state that 12 pounds of pintos will feed 100 people.

You can extrapolate from there. Beans go a long way.
You might get tired of them after a while but they WILL keep you and your family alive. That is why I stock many hundreds of pounds of different types of dry beans in 5 gallon pails.

Also, 1/4 cup of DRY rice is one serving. When cooked, this equates to 1 cup of rice...it grows in size after it is cooked.

Now follow me here: 1 cup of cooked rice = 2 servings. An adult requires 6 servings of grains per day. So 3 cups of cooked rice per person/per day.

Hope this helps

Doginit
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I store a variety in all the foods I stock. Pinto beans are cheap from Sam's. You can get black beans at ethnic stores. Great Northerns are really versatile and pretty easy to find. Split peas and lentils cook really fast, etc. Basically store what you enjoy eating.

If you aren't experienced with different types of beans, maybe pick up some small packs of various types and google up some recipes for them. They're such a versatile food and there are recipes from all over the world that use them.

Longer cooking beans benefit from soaking overnight. It reduces the cooking time. A pressure cooker cuts hours off the cooking time too. And for fuel savings, you can buy or make a hyperinsulated pot cozy and transfer the pressure cooker to it after a few minutes at pressure. That way the beans will cook with the retained heat and you don't need to keep wasting fuel to cook them. Also, beans can be cracked or even ground to make them cook faster.
 

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Can someone tell me how exactly the better food grade 5 gallon buckets seal? Twist or those pop top deals? Or something else?
 

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Radman,
If you like pinto beans and can find them in large quantities, I think that is a good way to get started. I can buy them at the ghetto safeway in a large sack so it pays to look around. If you're looking at smaller quantities, make sure you look at the price per ounce. I found that walmart was charging more per ounce in the larger bags.

Doginit, help me out here. Is one cup of cooked rice 1 or 2 servings?
 

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I love baked beans most, but they are so versatile that you can use them even if you don't like beans! You can even make a nutritious flour to mix in with baked goods. I try to pick up a variety, since each tastes different, though usually I stick with smaller beans for decreased cooking times. That and rice can get you a long way toward food preps.
Soaking them overnight decreases both cooking times and gas. (Change the water to avoid gas before you cook them.) Pressure canning cooks them quickly and makes old beans tender...they do get tougher with age and take longer to cook otherwise.
You can plant all beans, so it's a future crop too.
Suggest that you learn how to cook them and try various recipes now when failures arn't so serious and when you can get used to using them.
 

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Excelsior
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It would be good to try all the kinds you can find to see what you like. I'm a big fan of dried beans...except for black beans, which most people love. So, sample some of everything and see what you like best. Imho, you should store as many kinds as you like as the variety is nice.

Soaking them overnight and then changing the water really cuts down on cooking time.

Lentils and split peas (I know...not beans, strictly speaking) both cook in only an hour or so. Split pea soup is easy to dehydrate and reconstitutes quickly.

Beans are easy to grow. If you let them dry on the vine, you still need to pick them and let them season out some more before they are truly dried and ready to pack away.

Beans can be used to make wonderful, slow cooked casseroles.

Dried lima beans are really good!
 

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traveler
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That is one of the very cool things about beans- you can just let them dry on the vine. I am growing beans, corn, potatoes, peanuts and wheat on the farm this year because of the low maintenance factor. I can't get up there often enough to grow things that require daily or even consistent weekly attention.

If you do grow beans for drying on the vine like this, be mindful that your yield won't be as high as those that are picked often.

This year I'm growing Jackson Wonder butter beans, Mississippi Cow Peas, Black Turtle, Calypso, Pinto, Navy and Red beans, and If they sprout, I'll have some huge tan Limas from Honduras. Soy would be nice if I can find OP bulk seed locally. They make a great roasted snack. Can't go wrong stockpiling dried beans, and few things are better than thick soupy beans piled on some fresh cornbread.
 

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I tend to buy whatever the stores carry. So I have quite a variety of beans (and peas too). They all taste different so it's better to know which ones you prefer. I like them all, some more then others.

I've yet to find a bulk source so I've bought many 1# bags. (most @$1/lb.)
I'm not sure of the total but it's got to be over 100#'s
I've got;
pinto
Black
red
Navy
Northern white
Lentil
Lima
split pea
black eyed pea
chickpea (garbanzo beans)

and some canned peas, string beans, lima beans and 'baked' beans.
 

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I woud like to add a question to this informative thread. What type of beans did the cowboys cook? You always see them eating beans (Wagon Train, Gunsmoke - you name it) in movies & TV so they must have dined on them in real life. Anybody know the answer? Also, if you have to soak them overnight to cut down on cooking time, how long did they actually have to boil them? And it looks like there's always a kind of gravy to dip bread in. What's in the gravy? I bet someone here knows the answers. Thanks!
 
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