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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife and I were wandering around the desert this weekend rock hounding and I slipped and twisted the crap out of my ankle. It's clearly sprained

It wasn't life or death but it hurt like hell to walk.

That night as I was sitting there alternating between a cold compress and a hot pad I started to think what would it be like to have an injury like this during a supply disruption.

With no power to the hotpad and nothing to make a cold compress with, the injury could really slow me or a loved one down.

Whenever I think of how to make things sans electricity, I have an old recipe book I break out.

You see, one of my ancestors was an apothecary/doctor who traveled west out here with the pioneers and his job was to keep people healthy enough to keep walking. This ancestor made the trip from Missouri to Utah on foot the whole way.
(Most folks back then actually walked out west pulling a handcart or wheelbarrow full of belongings).

One of the treasures that has been handed down by that ancestor is a book of remedies that he spent his life collecting, he called it his formulary. Modern medical science says a lot of his remedies are just as likely to kill you as to cure you, but every once in a while I stumble on a gem that was a bit ahead of it's time.

The recipe is actually very simple. Although I have had to modify it a little because some of the original ingredients (opium etc) are a bit hard to come by now days.

Anyways here is a recipe for something that will ease a strained or sprained muscle.

(You may need to repeat this process a few times to find the right strength for you, especially if you are using older or storebought herbs where the potency is unknown)

Take 1 lb of Unscented pure white petroleum jelly (original recipe this was lard, but PJ will last much longer).
1/2 to 1 cup of the hottest chili peppers you can find (I used jalepenos but any really hot one will do, failing that find some chili powder).

Over a warm but not hot flame, (I just set my range on simmer), place the petroleum jelly in a 1 quart kettle and melt it slowly

While that is melting crush and grind the peppers into powder as fine as you can get it. A mortar and pestle works great here, but a coffee grinder is even better.

Slowly stir the powdered herb into the kettle and keep stirring for between 30 minutes and 1 hour. You will know when it's done by smelling, if the liquid inflames the nose when you smell it it's ready. (In my case it was a bit like being maced). My wife said it just "smells hot as hell" and I tend to agree. The smell ought to cause your sinuses to snap shut suddenly. Make sure to smell it, not breath it (nose not mouth), because it is a serious irritant at this stage.

Find a cotton muslin or cheese cloth (dish towel material works great here too), just make sure it's 100% cotton. Polyester and other blends will be severely damaged and may contaminate it.

Place the cloth over a wide mouth jar and slowly pour in the contents of the kettle. This will catch the large portions of pepper that may still be remaining (the marc).

Next squeeze the remaining material out of the marc. Use strong tongs, or a garlic press, don't use your hands unless you want everything you eat to have a strong jalepeno taste for the next few days.

Allow the liquid to re-solidify, when solid it is ready for dispensing or use.

You now have an incredible treatment for strains, sprains and muscle aches.

When you apply it to the skin massage it in thoroughly after a minute or two it will move from cold to a gentle warming sensation to positively hot. Done properly the activity curve from mild to hot to mild again is about 4 hours, however it's entirely dependent on the potency of the peppers used.

If used externally, it should be perfectly safe to use PRN (as needed), as long as you have no allergies to peppers.

Caution: This is big boy, adult strength stuff. Do not use this on young children (under the age of 12), or on those with really sensitive skin. If you need it for someone younger or with sensitive skin, mix and melt 1 tbs of this stuff with an entire 1lb jar of petroleum jelly add 1 tbsp of aloe gel and re-pour. If that's not strong enough then keep adding 1 tbs per mix & melt until it has the desired effect (warm to hot with no significant skin irritation).

It seems to work great for me there is no pain in my ankle anymore.
I also gave some to an elderly neighbor lady who has had foot trouble for years and she reports being completely pain free for the first time in memory.

In case you are wondering, the process described works by pulling capsaicin out of the peppers and then infusing it into the petroleum jelly.

Capsaicin is the part of peppers that gives them the sensation of being hot.

There are two theories about how this rub works.

I believe it's working by triggering nerve endings that are responsible for the feeling of heat. When the body detects this warming sensation it acts pretty much the same as if there were a hot pad on the area and performs essentially the same functions it would if there were in fact heat.

There is also a theory that it works by sensory overload, that is the capsaicin triggers the hot response (which is a type of pain response) so strongly that other pain receptors in the brain become depleted.

I'm not sure I buy that since places on my body that generally ache and pain still do so even after applying this to injuries. However applying it to my general aches and pains works great.

A word of caution, I have also found from experience that this stuff will irritate any mucous membranes or other softer tissues it comes in contact with.

While it may be very annoying, it's not dangerous. If you happen to get some in a place you didn't intend, just wash the affected area with baking soda and water (don't bother with soap or plain water, the jelly just repels it).

One other note, this stuff makes a pretty great hand and foot warmer just rub it on your hands and feet before you put on your gloves or socks. It will keep cold appendages feeling toasty warm for hours.

One final note: Do not use this on any open sores or wounds, it will hurt like getting branded.
 

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Anyways here is a recipe for something that will ease a strained or sprained muscle.

(You may need to repeat this process a few times to find the right strength for you, especially if you are using older or storebought herbs where the potency is unknown)

Take 1 lb of Unscented pure white petroleum jelly (original recipe this was lard, but PJ will last much longer).
1/2 to 1 cup of the hottest chili peppers you can find (I used jalepenos but any really hot one will do, failing that find some chili powder).

Over a warm but not hot flame, (I just set my range on simmer), place the petroleum jelly in a 1 quart kettle and melt it slowly

While that is melting crush and grind the peppers into powder as fine as you can get it. A mortar and pestle works great here, but a coffee grinder is even better.

Slowly stir the powdered herb into the kettle and keep stirring for between 30 minutes and 1 hour. You will know when it's done by smelling, if the liquid inflames the nose when you smell it it's ready. (In my case it was a bit like being maced). My wife said it just "smells hot as hell" and I tend to agree. The smell ought to cause your sinuses to snap shut suddenly. Make sure to smell it, not breath it (nose not mouth), because it is a serious irritant at this stage.

Find a cotton muslin or cheese cloth (dish towel material works great here too), just make sure it's 100% cotton. Polyester and other blends will be severely damaged and may contaminate it.

Place the cloth over a wide mouth jar and slowly pour in the contents of the kettle. This will catch the large portions of pepper that may still be remaining (the marc).

Next squeeze the remaining material out of the marc. Use strong tongs, or a garlic press, don't use your hands unless you want everything you eat to have a strong jalepeno taste for the next few days.

Allow the liquid to re-solidify, when solid it is ready for dispensing or use.

You now have an incredible treatment for strains, sprains and muscle aches.
A very ingenious recipe. I have known about the medicinal properties of Capsaicin for some time now (took an herbal remedies course about a year back), but I have never known a good way to topically apply it, save just rubbing jalapenos on the area. :D:

But this is not all Capsaicin is good for. It also has mild anti-microbial properties, and helps with your intestinal health.

I found this website a few days ago will looking into Capsaicin for a project. It might help explain things better than what I have done.

http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/phytochemicals/pages/capsaicin.html

Well, I know what I'll be doing tomorrow. :D:
 

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Geronimo!
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My every-other-day take from my pepper garden pictured here:



For all the same reasons mentioned in the OP, I always recommend, errrr, make that strongly suggest ... I always strongly suggest that you wear gloves when handling peppers. I wear gloves when I am cutting peppers up to make my pepper sauce every couple of nights. But I still get a little on my wrists from time to time and the stuff will burn you. If you get it on your fingers it'll stay there for days. And if you get it all over your hands and/or face or wherever, and it has not be properly diluted, you will regret it big time.

I'll process close to a dozen bushels of habies this season and another half dozen bushels jalapeño and probably four bushels of Charleston hots. I wear rubber gloves and safety glasses when processing peppers, at all times.

Just thought I'd throw that in there for safety's sake.

BTW, I totally agree. We're pepper lovers around here ... for cooking, for first aid, for pest control and for home security even. One of nature's best gifts.

Here are some we roasted last night, (while grilling some chicken), before I begin making my batches of roasted pepper sauce. The peppers you see here make about two gallons of sauce.



Getting the pure Capsicum oil out of them for medicinal purposes, etc., etc., etc., is the real trick.

 

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Ham Extra Class
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You should try to publish the "formulary" along with the orgins of the book, it could bring you some extra cash and also help others in the process.
Thanks for the tip.
 

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I can't use hot peppers in any way, but I have found that a foot soak with black tea, and several other herbs helps. Other than that, you rest it, raise it, and wrap it.
 

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oh man that looks so good Gallo Pazzesco. i cant grow my own peppers anymore, i really miss having fresh jalapenos. and Sirisque, that sounds like it would make a great sports rub, i will have to try it.

you definitely need to wash your hands 2 or 3 times after handling hot peppers, my ex-girlfriend and i had a bad night after a day of making homemade salsa. while cleaning up i got some juice from habaneros on my hands, and thought i had everything rinsed off my hands pretty good. later we started to get kinda frisky and well, long story short, she really DID NOT like the "warming sensations" she felt in a tender place and i got to sleep on the couch.
 

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1/2 water 1/2 woods
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You could get a "Magic Wand" from office depot, scan the whole book, turn it into a book and sell it to us! I think that would be really great to see.... Thanks for the info...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You should try to publish the "formulary" along with the orgins of the book, it could bring you some extra cash and also help others in the process.
Thanks for the tip.
I am working on my own version because there are several problems with his formulary.

The first being many ingredients such as opium aren't really available anymore and he does mention it rather frequently. I'm guessing he might have had a slight addiction to the stuff.
The other problem is and understand I'm speaking as a medico-pharmacy student, most of his "cures" are just as likely to kill you as to cure you. Comfrey for instance is used heavily in the formulary for all kinds of things, but we've recently found that Comfrey is hepato-toxic. Mercury is another, it is used as a suspensory agent and also it appears he was using it to treat many things that now days would be treated with anti-biotics. (Note for you folks who are thinking of using collodial silver, it doesn't work and may in fact be very harmful, google for agyria. Yes it is anti-microbial, but that is not the same as anti-biotic)

The final problem is that his understanding of medicine is based on what we now know to be a flawed and dangerous model of medicine. The formulary often times uses terms such as "The cause of fever is an imbalance in the humors. Therefore to reduce fever one must first bleed the patient for 3 hours and then give cool water to drink."

There are also frequent mentions of real homeopathy, not herablism and home remedies or alternative medicine like we think of today, but real honest to god "same suffering" medicine. In this model you treat a symptom in a sick person by giving them something that would cause the same symptom in a healthy person. For instance, if a person complains of diarrhea you would give them what amounts to a laxative. The theory was that what would make a well man sick, should make a sick man well.

All of this makes it a bit of an adventure to try and figure out what was actually working and what was simply placebo and furthermore and to further discern what may have worked well in the short term but could produce bad long term outcomes (for instance Comfrey, Mercury & Silver). In other words I still need to sort the good medicine from the bad.

If anyone is interested I am planning to take everything I've learned about how to safely produce effective medicines (compounding) and write a guide targeted for someone facing a supply disruption issue such as natural disaster and/or end of the world. It's based entirely on hard science instead of "folk remedies". Not that there is anything wrong with folk remedies, but there are already so many of those around, I just feel it's time someone wrote a book on how to make modern medicines.

My current working title is.
"So it's the end of the world and you're out of medicine, now what?"

In the meantime, keep checking my posts. As I finish school and get more hands on with the art and science of apothecary / pharmacy I'll keep updating the board.

Btw, would anyone be interested in complete plans for a real honest to god handheld device that can reduce healing times on bone fractures by up to 50%? It's actually an FDA approved device and frankly it's not any harder to make than a radio. I can publish the plans because it just came off patent last year. It costs less than $50 in parts from Radio Shack but all the parts are incredibly mundane and common so they could be scavenged in an emergency. I built one for my mother when she fell and broke her arm. Her doctor prescribed the commercial version but it's a $5,000 device at retail. Her arm healed in 4 weeks, not shaby for an 82 yr old pack a day smoker.

Let me know your thoughts.
 

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@Sirisque- I would definitely be interested in the plans for such a device, as well as your book. If it is able to be properly explained on here, how does the device work?
 

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My wife and I were wandering around the desert this weekend rock hounding and I slipped and twisted the crap out of my ankle. It's clearly sprained

It wasn't life or death but it hurt like hell to walk.

That night as I was sitting there alternating between a cold compress and a hot pad I started to think what would it be like to have an injury like this during a supply disruption.

With no power to the hotpad and nothing to make a cold compress with, the injury could really slow me or a loved one down.

Whenever I think of how to make things sans electricity, I have an old recipe book I break out.

You see, one of my ancestors was an apothecary/doctor who traveled west out here with the pioneers and his job was to keep people healthy enough to keep walking. This ancestor made the trip from Missouri to Utah on foot the whole way.
(Most folks back then actually walked out west pulling a handcart or wheelbarrow full of belongings).

One of the treasures that has been handed down by that ancestor is a book of remedies that he spent his life collecting, he called it his formulary. Modern medical science says a lot of his remedies are just as likely to kill you as to cure you, but every once in a while I stumble on a gem that was a bit ahead of it's time.

The recipe is actually very simple. Although I have had to modify it a little because some of the original ingredients (opium etc) are a bit hard to come by now days.

Anyways here is a recipe for something that will ease a strained or sprained muscle.

(You may need to repeat this process a few times to find the right strength for you, especially if you are using older or storebought herbs where the potency is unknown)

Take 1 lb of Unscented pure white petroleum jelly (original recipe this was lard, but PJ will last much longer).
1/2 to 1 cup of the hottest chili peppers you can find (I used jalepenos but any really hot one will do, failing that find some chili powder).

Over a warm but not hot flame, (I just set my range on simmer), place the petroleum jelly in a 1 quart kettle and melt it slowly

While that is melting crush and grind the peppers into powder as fine as you can get it. A mortar and pestle works great here, but a coffee grinder is even better.

Slowly stir the powdered herb into the kettle and keep stirring for between 30 minutes and 1 hour. You will know when it's done by smelling, if the liquid inflames the nose when you smell it it's ready. (In my case it was a bit like being maced). My wife said it just "smells hot as hell" and I tend to agree. The smell ought to cause your sinuses to snap shut suddenly. Make sure to smell it, not breath it (nose not mouth), because it is a serious irritant at this stage.

Find a cotton muslin or cheese cloth (dish towel material works great here too), just make sure it's 100% cotton. Polyester and other blends will be severely damaged and may contaminate it.

Place the cloth over a wide mouth jar and slowly pour in the contents of the kettle. This will catch the large portions of pepper that may still be remaining (the marc).

Next squeeze the remaining material out of the marc. Use strong tongs, or a garlic press, don't use your hands unless you want everything you eat to have a strong jalepeno taste for the next few days.

Allow the liquid to re-solidify, when solid it is ready for dispensing or use.

You now have an incredible treatment for strains, sprains and muscle aches.

When you apply it to the skin massage it in thoroughly after a minute or two it will move from cold to a gentle warming sensation to positively hot. Done properly the activity curve from mild to hot to mild again is about 4 hours, however it's entirely dependent on the potency of the peppers used.

If used externally, it should be perfectly safe to use PRN (as needed), as long as you have no allergies to peppers.

Caution: This is big boy, adult strength stuff. Do not use this on young children (under the age of 12), or on those with really sensitive skin. If you need it for someone younger or with sensitive skin, mix and melt 1 tbs of this stuff with an entire 1lb jar of petroleum jelly add 1 tbsp of aloe gel and re-pour. If that's not strong enough then keep adding 1 tbs per mix & melt until it has the desired effect (warm to hot with no significant skin irritation).

It seems to work great for me there is no pain in my ankle anymore.
I also gave some to an elderly neighbor lady who has had foot trouble for years and she reports being completely pain free for the first time in memory.

In case you are wondering, the process described works by pulling capsaicin out of the peppers and then infusing it into the petroleum jelly.

Capsaicin is the part of peppers that gives them the sensation of being hot.

There are two theories about how this rub works.

I believe it's working by triggering nerve endings that are responsible for the feeling of heat. When the body detects this warming sensation it acts pretty much the same as if there were a hot pad on the area and performs essentially the same functions it would if there were in fact heat.

There is also a theory that it works by sensory overload, that is the capsaicin triggers the hot response (which is a type of pain response) so strongly that other pain receptors in the brain become depleted.

I'm not sure I buy that since places on my body that generally ache and pain still do so even after applying this to injuries. However applying it to my general aches and pains works great.

A word of caution, I have also found from experience that this stuff will irritate any mucous membranes or other softer tissues it comes in contact with.

While it may be very annoying, it's not dangerous. If you happen to get some in a place you didn't intend, just wash the affected area with baking soda and water (don't bother with soap or plain water, the jelly just repels it).

One other note, this stuff makes a pretty great hand and foot warmer just rub it on your hands and feet before you put on your gloves or socks. It will keep cold appendages feeling toasty warm for hours.

One final note: Do not use this on any open sores or wounds, it will hurt like getting branded.
Unless I suffer trauma or need an operation I use absolutely no meds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
@Sirisque- I would definitely be interested in the plans for such a device, as well as your book. If it is able to be properly explained on here, how does the device work?
Ok so here is the commercial device I'm talking about...
http://global.smith-nephew.com/master/EXOGEN_ULTRASOUND_BONE_HEALING_SYSTEM.htm

I have a copy of the patent around here somewhere, with the exact specifics but here goes the readers digest version.

Term to know: Piezo Electricity - Electricity generated by the deformation of a crystalline structure.

Bone is comprised of a crystalline substance and generates electricity when deformed. For instance when you jump and you feel a sudden shock on landing, you know the one that makes you weak in the knees for a second? It is due to your bone deforming and sending an electric pulse to your brain.

In this capacity the piezo electric function of bone is acting as a shock sensor. However it has other functions.

Piezo electricity is a reversible phenomena meaning that deformation generates current, but applying current also causes deformation. You can see this effect in every buzzer device you have.

A current to a piezo type crystal deforms it and since the crystal is attached to a metal plate it deforms the metal plate generating a sound wave.

All piezo devices are therefore in fact transducers meaning that they can both send and receive. When you go in for an ultrasound the device sends a sound wave into your body, the wave bounces off your organs and returns (deflected by the organs), back to the buzzer that sent it, thereby generating a current which is interpreted by a computer program.

A doctor in the early 1980s discovered that because bone is piezo electric that certain ultrasonic wave forms could stimulate osteon in the bone to reproduce much more rapidly than it otherwise would. This had the effect of knitting the bone together quicker.

What he stumbled on was that with a properly set fracture, placing an ultrasonic transducer over the area of the break and firing a specific pulse repeatedly for 15-20 minutes per day causes the two broken bone ends to stitch back together.

It works because the sound pulse deforms the bone, generating a specific electric current on both sides of the bone simultaneously, this current stimulates the bone tissue on both sides of the gap to grow more quickly although the exact method is not currently well understood. ( I do have my theories on it though)

Since the broken bone material doesn't respond to just any wave thrown at it you have to generate a very specific pulse shape and the modulation has to be in the Mhz range.

This means that the circuit looks like a radio transmitter except that the final output is to a piezo transducer instead of an antenna.

When I first started looking into this, what shocked me is that my daughter has an FM microphone toy I built for her and the circuitry has the exact same characteristics as the exogen bone device.

When my mother broke her arm and got her prescription for this $5,000 device (although her co-pay would only have been $100) I built her one just like my daughters only instead of an electret mic it has a sinewave generator to create the pulse shape and instead of an antenna it drives an op amp tied to a piezo transducer for output.

You can quite likely find the FM microphone toy at any toy store and it's also a staple of most beginning - intermediate level electronics kits. From there it really is just a matter of down tuning the circuit to operate at 1.5Mhz instead of the 87.5 - 108Mhz the original circuit calls for. It's basically a change of 1 capacitor and then some fine tuning work.

Anyways I'm probably going into too much depth in this explanation.

Maybe I'll put together a proper DIY kit if there's enough demand for it. Or if nothing else maybe I can put in a HOWTO as a chapter in my book.
 

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Geronimo!
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Gallo, that's awesome. I really appreciate someone who has the balls to grow all those habaneros.

Got any pics of the garden?
Thanks TexasHammer. I'll try to take some tomorrow and get them posted soon if my garden survives these storms tonight. We're getting pounded out there right now.
 
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