Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 56 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/01/world/americas/canada-hiker-rescue/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

A man barely made it out of the wilderness alive after a bear attack. Not because he was injured but because the bear destroyed all of his stuff. His dog didn't make it though. He's lucky to still be breathing and would not be were if not for rescue workers. And this from an experienced outdoors man.

Made me start to wonder what he could have different?
Maybe hang his food from a tree? Bury a small cache of essential items?
 

·
Seeking Knowledge
Joined
·
216 Posts
If he wasn't taking the bear minimum (sorry) precautions he should have in bear country then I just don't know what to say.

I wonder if he actually let his compass get away from him or if he was headed home when found....

Seems like some basic mistakes might have been made.
 

·
"who is John Galt?"
Joined
·
32 Posts
So hard to judge without more facts. Here in Mi. the DNR is soooo protective of the bears we have had bears coming right up a guys treestand (while deer hunting)and if you shoot it you are under investigation. A guy who lives to hunt here will do anything to not get his privilages taken away. We keep being told that black bears and wolves will not attack humans despite common sense and proven attacks.

At my BOL area last year, I had more bears on my game camera's than deer, but it takes 7 years to get a bear permit in that area!

The more you put government in control of, the more messed up it will be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
To his credit, there is no indication that this guy was a hunter or whether he had a gun. He probably should have had something in bear country.

I guess rather than look at specifically WHY he lost all of his stuff (the bear), I'd be interested in hearing about what a survivalist could have done after all of his stuff was taken? He was basically put into a situation where he was facing hypothermia and starvation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,706 Posts
Well, my first instinct is to ask where he was when the bear attacked his camp.

If he was in his sleeping bag, in his underwear, then he was lucky as stink.

If he was away from camp, he should have been carrying a least basic gear with him. I don't go anywhere into the wild without basics in all my pockets (pants, shirt, jacket, etc) and if I am moving more than 10ft from camp(well, my pack really) I take my bivouac belt. Been on way too many survival courses and seen how easy it is to be without nothing. When I am canoeing and such I wear a lighter weight, waterproof version of my belt.

The next piece of info I want to know it did he know he was going in bear territory or was the bear a random encounter. If he was in bear territory, did he properly secure his food supplies for such? Sounds like he did not.

I don't know...too little info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,398 Posts
Writer’s Block nailed it. We’ve done a lot of backpacking in thick black bear areas and never had an issue. Knowing how to hang your food bag properly is quite important and not something to take lightly. Not so much a threat, but any backpacking trip will be cut short if teddy swipes your meal plan.

Many forget about their snacks. We have a strict rule of making sure you remove wrappers and all snacks from packs and especially hammocks/tents. Even an innocent Snicker’s wrapper can end up with your hammock or tent getting shredded from an inquisitive bear.

We have done “day hikes” from our main camp site and again, it’s important to make your site less of a target and also ensure you have enough essentials in case Mr. Bear gets lucky. There are several cases where bears have been seen dragging off a hiker’s whole backpack…if all your eggs are in one basket, you’re screwed.

I don’t know if it really works, but we urinate in a perimeter around the camp site and I like to make even a small fire (if allowed) to make the area smell smoky to dissuade the less determined critters. I do pack a gun, but if I have to use it, it’s because I failed somewhere else along the line. The black bears we have are not that aggressive, but they are persistent and sneaky; if you don’t plan and prepare, you will have a miserable experience that could turn deadly more from exposure than any furbearing threat.

Everybody carries their own bear bag when we backpack and although we can often consolidate all the bags on one line, we can spread out if necessary. Hanging a bag takes some practice (as my wife will tell you), but the goal is to get it 15-20 feet up and away from any trees large enough for a raccoon or bear to climb up to snag...



ROCK6
 

·
Semper Fi
Joined
·
2,808 Posts
And what did we learn here? That a survival tin, knife, gun, should always be on us? And to hang our food. Not smell like food. Perfume. Blood.

Granted the dude was in Canada, but there are firearms in Canada, for now.

Keep survival gear on you, not in a pack. And some things even after a grizz rips them apart are still salvageable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,706 Posts
In some parts of Canada (especially where high levels of bear are consistently present) they will not let you into the area without a sufficiently capable firearm...even if you are NOT there to hunt.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LadyGun55

·
Pencil 5, AUTOCAD 0
Joined
·
3,660 Posts
Up here it is called being Bear wise. Black Bears are smart, they are opportunistic, and
above all, they are ALWAYS hungry. I have used plastic margerine containers with a
little bleach in them around a perimeter... but you still have to hang your food up!! Bears
don't like to work too hard. they stick to game trails, and they flip over rocks, and rip into
logs, and dig up chipmunk holes, and eat grass like a cow. You keep an eye out for this
as you go into the bush. Scat is not always the thing you look for. ROCK6 is right about
a gun... 95% of the time you will never need it, but sometimes Bears make that decision for
you. Welcome to the food chain.
 

·
TEXAS!!!
Joined
·
7,324 Posts
http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/01/world/americas/canada-hiker-rescue/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

A man barely made it out of the wilderness alive after a bear attack. Not because he was injured but because the bear destroyed all of his stuff. His dog didn't make it though. He's lucky to still be breathing and would not be were if not for rescue workers. And this from an experienced outdoors man.

Made me start to wonder what he could have different?
Maybe hang his food from a tree? Bury a small cache of essential items?
He has no primitive skills. Just because someone professes to be an "experienced outdoorsman", doesn't make it so.

I'm glad he survived, I'm sorry he lost his companion, but the reality of it is, he didn't know what he could forage that time of the year, he didn't know how to fabricate the tools to get it. He didn't know how to fabricate the tools and equipment necessary to obtain food. If the bear wasn't hibernating, it wasn't too cold to find forage, fish or to find food.

These kinds of stories are what make people say "You can't survive outdoors, just look at what happened to this "experienced" woodsman!"

I have said it before,

If you NEED a BoB to survive out of doors, if you NEED a fire steel, if you NEED to take a knife, because you don't know how to make a primitive knife, you are not suited for anything but misery and eventual death if you're stranded in the wilderness. The woods are VERY unforgiving!

REAL skills trump equipment.
 

·
Pencil 5, AUTOCAD 0
Joined
·
3,660 Posts
When I took the job here as maintenance/winter keeper, I knew right away that if
I didn't get trained, I was dead. My mentor came out after the Lodge was closed,
and for the next 3 years taught me pretty much everything he knew about living
here. Notice I said LIVING. From the ground up, shelter, fire, tracking, food...
all Fred Flintstone as he called it... he made it fun, and he made it look easy
because he had the skills. Wisdom is knowledge gained from real experience,
not You-tube. You have to respect where you are, and what it can do in
the blink of an eye.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,460 Posts
Bear secret # one

If you are afraid of the Bear the Bear knows it

Bear secret #2

If you are armed the Bear knows it

Bear secret #3

the Bear can smell moths molting 60 miles away so her can smell you and everything you have so act accordingly
 

·
CTP
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
Here's my question. He didn't use good judgement in bear country. He was out forma planned two months or so. The bear ate all his foods and food supples, etc. OK, fine. Surely wasn't packing two months worth of food. Don't think that's even possible. So what was his plan for food when his packed in food was gone? Was he going to fish, trap, hunt small game??? If so and as ar as I know beads don't eat fishing rods, lures, knives, .22 cal pistols, ammo, snares, fire starter, rat traps, 550 cord, etc, etc, etc. Yes, a bear may chew on his fish rod and gear but generally it will be somewhat useable.

Sounds to me like he started out ill prepared from the start. You don't go on a two month adventure with with just packed in Food and no other way to procure/catch/trap it and prepare it; except him. I bet he wasn't an experienced outdoorsman but an avid day hiker / canoest.
 

·
Blame Canada.
Joined
·
3,226 Posts
no gun. no "experience" surviving. cannot be called a survivalist. more like a yuppie hiker/camper.
First off, fire arms offer a false sense of security, and only for the extreamly weak. Second, in reading the article, the guy sounded like he.has.been doing this awhile. To me it sounded like needed to keep a clean camp, and even then, bears will get into bear cans. So in my mind, a dude.going out and doing it is more of what i would call capible, rather then some couch commando hugging his boom stick at a computer desk.:thumb:
 

·
dumb farm boy
Joined
·
668 Posts
First off, fire arms offer a false sense of security, and only for the extreamly weak. Second, in reading the article, the guy sounded like he.has.been doing this awhile. To me it sounded like needed to keep a clean camp, and even then, bears will get into bear cans. So in my mind, a dude.going out and doing it is more of what i would call capible, rather then some couch commando hugging his boom stick at a computer desk.:thumb:
:rofl: thank you for the kind remarks.
 

·
Happy to be here!
Joined
·
5,274 Posts
Two month solo trip into the Canadian wilderness....wow. He was probably a hundred miles in. I'm not bad mouthing the guy at all. As big as his balls are, I'm suprised he didn't swamp his canoe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,398 Posts
Two month solo trip into the Canadian wilderness....wow. He was probably a hundred miles in. I'm not bad mouthing the guy at all. As big as his balls are, I'm suprised he didn't swamp his canoe.
Yeah, you do have to give him some credit for actually surviving; especially for as long as he did. I would be interested in reading his account; for a bear to just take his food and trash his camp and "destroy" all the tools he needed to survive is interesting. The guy had a canoe and I would assume had fishing gear. Most outdoorsmen I know carry a belt knife and some type of fire-making tool. No gun is a conundrum just given the location in bear country, but aside from self defense, there is game available if you have any hunting skills, a little luck and some patience. If did have fishing tackle, he could have survived on fish for quite some time. I'm also wondering if his canoe was sacked. He must have had some form or shelter or he would have died from exposure much sooner but the culprit just looked like starvation yet they did mention hypothermia.

This will be an interesting tale to follow up on when we get more details. He does sound like an experience outdoorsman, but it also proves that no one is immune to accidents. It does help reinforce layers of preparation and taking extra precautions with camp set up, securing food and assessing potential threats...I'll be waiting for "the rest of the story"...

ROCK6
 
1 - 20 of 56 Posts
Top