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Discussion Starter #1
I can buy the following for $500.00. It is stored in twelve food grade 5 gallon buckets. Inside each bucket is a mylar bag, vacuum sealed with the dry food inside. Reportedly this has a 30 year shelf life. Contents:

1. 100 lbs of rice
2. 70 lbs of beans
3. 70 lbs of couscous
4. 70 lbs of lentils
5. 60 lbs of oats.

Delivered! That's 370 lbs of bulk food, packaged and delivered to my door for $1.36 per lb.

If it's even close to a good deal and saves me a lot of time and hassle, I'm inclined to go with it.

Thoughts?
 

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Seems high to me.

Buckets are cheap, mylar is cheap, oxygen is cheap, and really ingredients are...you guessed it....cheap if you buy in bulk.

The only thing is it will take you a good amount time to dump and seal so if your time is that valuable than it is probably a good deal.
 

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Check Sam's or some place like that and see how much the foods would run, plus the supplies to package. Then see how much you are paying to have someone else do the work for you and if that is worth it for you.

Of course it will be higher versus you doing it yourself cause everyone has to make money to stay in business. Figure how much shipping is because that's usually where they really hit you.
 

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It's not...terrible. It depends on what you have to pay, where you are, for bulk oats, beans, lentils, rice, couscous.

The buckets and lids (good ones) and mylar and O2 absorbers are probably worth...$10 each, so that's $120.

The rice I can buy at Sam's for $50 for 100 pounds, so that's $50.

Lentils are more expensive. They'll probably run you from $1.50 to $2.00 per pound, so you're looking at probably $105-140.

Beans are hard to guess, as we don't know which kind they are. Probably $1.00 to $1.50 per pound, so $70-105.

Couscous probably in the neighborhood of...$1.50 per pound, or $105.

Oats about $1.33 a pound (for steel cut oats), so about $80.

As I add that up, it's $120 + $50 + $105 + 105 + 105 + 80 for a total of...$475. (I rounded down on the lentils, rounded up on the beans).

So if you accept the prices, it's not a terrible deal. You don't have to go through the problem of procuring everything, nor packing everything.
 

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Look Behind You!!
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You could do it cheaper yourself.

Try it, it's kinda fun to do. I did eight buckets of rice at once and it did not take me long at all.
 

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Alas, Babylon
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While the price is on the higher side, the extra cost might be worth it just to have the convenience of it packaged and stored correctly at the get-go. I don't mind paying a little extra for getting something done in an expedient fashion sometimes if I don't have extra time on my hands!
 

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While the price is on the higher side, the extra cost might be worth it just to have the convenience of it packaged and stored correctly at the get-go. I don't mind paying a little extra for getting something done in an expedient fashion sometimes if I don't have extra time on my hands!
A lot of it for me is trust especially considering I am putting mine and my family's life in my preps. I know if I pack it then it will done right and if not I only have myself to blame.

To me packing is damn near easy. Open up a beer, sit in front of the TV, and pack away. Takes a couple hours and everyone can find that even if it is after the kids go to be bed. Take the two less hours of sleep for the peace of mind your **** will work.
 

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Alas, Babylon
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A lot of it for me is trust especially considering I am putting mine and my family's life in my preps. I know if I pack it then it will done right and if not I only have myself to blame.

To me packing is damn near easy. Open up a beer, sit in front of the TV, and pack away. Takes a couple hours and everyone can find that even if it is after the kids go to be bed. Take the two less hours of sleep for the peace of mind your **** will work.
Being dried goods pre-packed in mylar and buckets, the odds are in his favor. I'd roll the dice on it.
 

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Being dried goods pre-packed in mylar and buckets, the odds are in his favor. I'd roll the dice on it.
That is a personal choice because everyone has to decide what level of risk is acceptable to them.

To me it is my bread and butter when I need it and I would rather trust myself than some machine.

Same reason why I started reloading my own bullets, making my own furniture, brewing my own beer, etc. etc. etc.

I want to control every aspect of what I can and if not put my trust only in people or companies I trust. Really freaking hard to do in this day and age. I will not deny that but way more rewarding to look at a bookshelf you made versus buying some crap that was built in China.

Then again I will happily admit I have control and trust issues so take what I say with a grain of salt.
 

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Being vacuum sealed automatically makes it not a good deal in my opinion. If the bags had O2 absorbers instead, I might think otherwise. But that alone would be the deal breaker.

Vacuum sealing doesn't remove nearly as much O2 as an O2 absorber would. This tells me a lot about the company packaging it. It tells me that they're a fly by nighter, new to the industry, not following proven storage methods, and just out to make a quick buck. There are a LOT of them in recent years.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the advice thus far. I appreciate it. The guy arranging this for me, and others, is a solid prepper with years of experience. I trust him. The company doing the work isn't new and I'm fine with vacuum sealed. I can see me adding to this with canned vegetables, honey, sugar, salt, spices and other basics. But, this feels like a nice jump start to my preps. I'm not afraid or unwilling to do things for myself. I reload my own ammo and am good with my hands. But, right now, I have more money than time (sounds weird to say that, but it's true).

The deal seems fair and I'll likely take it, but am learning a lot here. Thanks again!
 

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Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum
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You could get roughly the same stuff, same quantities at Costco for a couple hundred less.
 
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I don't think it's that bad a deal. I can't find beans here so I ordered them from EE and the price isn't way off from what I guess you're paying per item. Matter of fact, EE's prices jumped $10 a super pail from what I paid last year.

Prepping is getting excess stuff put away for troublesome times so if the deal doesn't hurt you - I'd do it. I personally have a mix of freeze dried and store bought - self stored food. I hope to never HAVE to use it. A goal of many preppers is to do it at unbeatable prices. Not everyone has that kind of time. Good luck on your preps Major!
 

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Alas, Babylon
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That is a personal choice because everyone has to decide what level of risk is acceptable to them.

To me it is my bread and butter when I need it and I would rather trust myself than some machine.

Same reason why I started reloading my own bullets, making my own furniture, brewing my own beer, etc. etc. etc.

I want to control every aspect of what I can and if not put my trust only in people or companies I trust. Really freaking hard to do in this day and age. I will not deny that but way more rewarding to look at a bookshelf you made versus buying some crap that was built in China.

Then again I will happily admit I have control and trust issues so take what I say with a grain of salt.
Agreed, I am a bit of a control freak when it comes to my preps ... but there are moments in my life where time disappears on me too. If trying to find the time means it will be postponed indefinitely and I can afford it, I am in the camp of just 'get'er done' and would take the risk. Fortunately, the op is acquainted with and trusts this person and the items are such that they store well so there is a strong chance all will work out well.

I see the risk about the same as people who buy cases of products and aren't attentive to rotation or expiry dates or buying cases of Mountain House or other freeze-dried/dehydrated products. Ultimately, anything bought pre-packaged will have the potential for a flaw but we certainly hope not!

Ultimately, if the OP wants to check on the quality, he might open up one of the mylar bags and re-package it after inspection.
 

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Old Hounds Smell Good
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It doesn't say where you live...but if I look at prices where I live, it's not a bad deal at all! I pay a goodly amount more than the midwest, say, on the basics simply because there is no place that sells basics in bulk.

If that compares reasonably well with what you can price it for locally, then I say it is a great deal.
 

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Agreed, I am a bit of a control freak when it comes to my preps ... but there are moments in my life where time disappears on me too. If trying to find the time means it will be postponed indefinitely and I can afford it, I am in the camp of just 'get'er done' and would take the risk. Fortunately, the op is acquainted with and trusts this person and the items are such that they store well so there is a strong chance all will work out well.

I see the risk about the same as people who buy cases of products and aren't attentive to rotation or expiry dates or buying cases of Mountain House or other freeze-dried/dehydrated products. Ultimately, anything bought pre-packaged will have the potential for a flaw but we certainly hope not!

Ultimately, if the OP wants to check on the quality, he might open up one of the mylar bags and re-package it after inspection.
My theory is if something is really important and you are dedicated you will make time instead of putting it off indefinite.

I see this all the time when people say oh I don't have time to work out. Then they sit at home for a couple hours watching TV or sleep 10 hours a night.

To me something like packaging up food, cleaning guns, etc. is really easy to find a couple hours a week to knock it out. Stay up an extra hour one night or wake up an hour early and just do it.

Not trying to make this a personal attack just saying in my experience the time excuse is just an excuse for laziness. There is nothing wrong with that because there is stuff I "outsource" out because at the end of the day I do not have the motivation to do it myself. Just say it is due to laziness or no motivation instead of saying I don't have time because there is always time.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
My theory is if something is really important and you are dedicated you will make time instead of putting it off indefinite.

I see this all the time when people say oh I don't have time to work out. Then they sit at home for a couple hours watching TV or sleep 10 hours a night.

To me something like packaging up food, cleaning guns, etc. is really easy to find a couple hours a week to knock it out. Stay up an extra hour one night or wake up an hour early and just do it.

Not trying to make this a personal attack just saying in my experience the time excuse is just an excuse for laziness. There is nothing wrong with that because there is stuff I "outsource" out because at the end of the day I do not have the motivation to do it myself. Just say it is due to laziness or no motivation instead of saying I don't have time because there is always time.
You have no knowledge of me or my work or travel schedule. Your input is noted and was filed appropriately.
 
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