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Desperta Ferro!
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8 in the tube +1 in the pipe for a Mossberg 500 SP or Tactical. I don't consider 9 shells a handicap at all. Plus, that's what bandoliers are for. 56 extra shells (65 total).

I don’t feel a pump shotgun is acceptable when semi autos are an option. Pumps are just not fast enough.
 

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I haven't read every single post, so forgive me if I repeat something already posted.

I think there are three factors often discounted when looking at shotgun.

1) Commonality. This means that, when all the mist has settled down after the S Hit the F, it will be much more likely I will find a stock of forgotten 12 gauge in a closet than I am a box of 300 or 500 WIn Mag. And in Canuckistan, where I live, you're dreamin' with the AR (especially since Justy Trudy made them illegal).

2) Raw intimidation. There are few weapons out there with the mystique (movie myth or otherwise) of the shotgun. The bad guys, especially if not well versed in firearms themselves, are not going to know what a shotgun really can and cannot do. Not to mention, the sound of chambering of a pump action passing on a message. They are a great and powerful fear inducer...not unlike the "scary black rifle".

3) Diversity of capacity. Look at the side by side or over under. How many AR platforms and such hit with two rounds at the same time? Again, in Canuckistan, even burst fire and such not allowed. Add to that the fact that a shotgun is great at opening doors, great at using ammos with vastly different effects, good in a lot of different firearms roles, and more.


Personally, I see the shotgun as a multi-tool; not ideal at anything but a well rounded workhorse. Sure, carrying around a tool kit filled with tools specifically suited to the task is ideal, but having one tool that can do a lot of jobs good enough to git er dun, well that's pretty darn convenient.
 

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8 in the tube +1 in the pipe for a Mossberg 500 SP or Tactical. I don't consider 9 shells a handicap at all. Plus, that's what bandoliers are for. 56 extra shells (65 total).
If you have a molle plate carrier then I’d get a Condor foldout shell carrier. They hold up to 24-25 rounds. I have two of them setup for buckshot and a 10 round shell holder for slugs. But the bandolier can get the job done. Also have a side saddle for the shotgun so that you have extra ammo immediately on it for home defense.
 

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I don’t feel a pump shotgun is acceptable when semi autos are an option. Pumps are just not fast enough.
That maybe true but the pump gives you better manipulation with changing ammo load out. Also pumps can shoot whatever reliably without any hindrance. And last you can clear any malfunctions which rare unless you short stroke it. Also pumps aren’t reliant on being rust proof because the best semi auto shotguns have chrome lining and must be cleaned thoroughly.
 

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I haven't read every single post, so forgive me if I repeat something already posted.

I think there are three factors often discounted when looking at shotgun.

1) Commonality. This means that, when all the mist has settled down after the S Hit the F, it will be much more likely I will find a stock of forgotten 12 gauge in a closet than I am a box of 300 or 500 WIn Mag. And in Canuckistan, where I live, you're dreamin' with the AR (especially since Justy Trudy made them illegal).

2) Raw intimidation. There are few weapons out there with the mystique (movie myth or otherwise) of the shotgun. The bad guys, especially if not well versed in firearms themselves, are not going to know what a shotgun really can and cannot do. Not to mention, the sound of chambering of a pump action passing on a message. They are a great and powerful fear inducer...not unlike the "scary black rifle".

3) Diversity of capacity. Look at the side by side or over under. How many AR platforms and such hit with two rounds at the same time? Again, in Canuckistan, even burst fire and such not allowed. Add to that the fact that a shotgun is great at opening doors, great at using ammos with vastly different effects, good in a lot of different firearms roles, and more.


Personally, I see the shotgun as a multi-tool; not ideal at anything but a well rounded workhorse. Sure, carrying around a tool kit filled with tools specifically suited to the task is ideal, but having one tool that can do a lot of jobs good enough to git er dun, well that's pretty darn convenient.
It’s sad but also good to have proof that there’s someone out there that would only have to rely on the shotgun. Many of us in more pro gun states forget that it’s not always about the weapon but how you use it. Thank you.
 

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KOAD; FOAD; ESAD
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And what year...(approx) was that?

I haven't seen a cop with a shotgun since the AWB expired.

Actually thats not true. In 2010 I saw one shoot a guy with a bean bag round. So there is that, but probably not a big draw for survivalism.
Got an 870 on the seat of my Tahoe-patrols w me everywhere..AR in the cargo pod..jm
 

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If you have a molle plate carrier then I’d get a Condor foldout shell carrier. They hold up to 24-25 rounds. I have two of them setup for buckshot and a 10 round shell holder for slugs. But the bandolier can get the job done. Also have a side saddle for the shotgun so that you have extra ammo immediately on it for home defense.
I have a couple of the bandoliers, but mostly as a means to move ammo around and carry it convenient than any thought of me actively wearing/patrolling in such.

I also want to weigh in as an advocate of those Condor foldouts. I have two (one on a security response belt) and I really like them. They take a bit of practice for those of us who had not used such carriers before (especially when simulating use in an event) but they hold up well and work really good. The interior arrangement even allows easy storage of different types of shells on different "faces" or sections of the holder. I've had mine for about six years. No regrets.
 

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IMHO Terrain and experience with firearms is key here. It takes some Skill and practice with any wpn to get proficient. Shot guns for the most part are close range wpns. 50 yds or less. The learning curve for a shotgun is no where near the learning curve for rifle or pistol. Some gauges and load's have recoil and then the ammo weight. But it's probably the most common wpn in north America behind the 30/30 and M-4 type platform with the exception of rimfire rifles. So it's just a tool and within it's limits it definitely something that should not be discarded nor sneezed at. In the coastal plains region of the US and some urban/suburban environments one is not outgunned in most situations. Now if one lives west of I-35 the rifle is king for the most part.
 

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Si vis pacem, para bellum
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How do you know that? Let’s not fall into “I’m good with this weapon so I’m invincible” because we may never know what would happen during a shtf situation. What if you caught a heart attack during the combat situation and your 10 year old daughter has to take the reigns. Now the situation has flipped from you having the advantage by being good with a weapon to the opponent having the advantage because a young girl has to fight them off while dealing with your severe medical condition. Yeas rifle and shotgun are better weapons than a handgun but a handgun is HANDY because it is easier to carry, conceal, and maneuver with than the longer or heavier rifle and shotgun. What if there’s a checkpoint and there’s no way to get around it. Approaching them with a long gun can be detrimental by making you a target. While a handgun iwb or in a fanny pack can make you look less suspicious. Shtf is playing the long game.

A couple things. First the requirements listed in the OP:
"Here's my criteria for survival weapon evaluation:
1) hunting practicality
2) defense ability
3) ammo availability
4) maintenance level
5) cost"
A handgun in a fanny pack fails the first miserably.

A handgun is a weapon of compromise/desperation. If you are in a gunfight with only a handgun your planning has failed. Having said that the likely hood of an all out gun fight, even post SHTF, is a rare occurence.

How do I know? Training and practice. Having a rich uncle who provided the ammo helps, BTW.

10 Year old daughter, no clue. Mine missed her 10th by about a week. Her mother on the other hand, well let's just say you don't mess with a momma bear defending her cubs.

Combat, no longer my job. My bug in location is off the beaten path. Again the likelihood of "combat" is low. Checkpoints argument is moot. I'm not going anywhere. Any involvement with a check point will be manning the one at the entrance to the subdivision. Even that possibility is slim.


What is all boils down to is the right tool for the task at hand. A handgun is the tool you have with you all the time. It is not a primary fighting tool. A little perspective. In our patrol trucks we had three choices. The 9mm on the belt, A shotgun and AR carbine in the rack. Primary, by policy, was the Shotgun. Situations where the carbine could be deployed were listed in the policy manual. The handgun was strictly an "OH ****" tool.
 

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Desperta Ferro!
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I don’t feel a pump shotgun is acceptable when semi autos are an option. Pumps are just not fast enough.
Well, for you with your unlimited budget, there's always the Saiga semi-auto / full auto SG.

Assets:
-Higher capacity mags and drums available
-Faster reload time than a tube
-Faster rate of firing
-Easy to handle, balanced weapon
-Moderate weight
-Clears a crowd away quickly

Detriments:
-Standard mag is only 8 shells
-More likely to jam / FTF / FTE
-Excess weight and storage issues for mags
-Heavier than a pump SG
-Cycles through shells faster
-Less accurate in full auto mode
-Banned by nobama in 2014 and impossible to find
 

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What hell, pay attention
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Well, for you with your unlimited budget, there's always the Saiga semi-auto / full auto SG.

Assets:
-Higher capacity mags and drums available
-Faster reload time than a tube
-Faster rate of firing
-Easy to handle, balanced weapon
-Moderate weight
-Clears a crowd away quickly

Detriments:
-Standard mag is only 8 shells
-More likely to jam / FTF / FTE
-Excess weight and storage issues for mags
-Heavier than a pump SG
-Cycles through shells faster
-Less accurate in full auto mode
-Banned by nobama in 2014 and impossible to find
If you like the Saiga's, the Chinese "Lynx12" is basically the same thing, readily available, and only about $450.

I have a couple of them and they are good shooters and have been trouble free. Mine have been very reliable and Ive yet to have any kind of stoppage or problem with function with them.

They arent really any heavier than anything else of similar size, and I find them to be handier and more maneuverable, especially in confined spaces, than your standard type shotgun.

I have 5 and 10 round mags for them, and those are fairly reasonable price wise as well. Once you figure out how best to load them, they are fast and easy to load. They are a bit different than your average AK to load.

Carrying the mags isnt really an issue. Three ten rounders fit in a standard Chicom chest bag.

I have a bunch of different 18"-20" guns, both pump and semiauto, and if I were to grab one, it would be one of the Lynx's.
 

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I think a mag fed shotgun is a bad idea. All the reliability issues , low capacity and no reloading to top off as you shoot which is about the only advantage a shotgun has over a rifle.
 

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A couple things. First the requirements listed in the OP:
"Here's my criteria for survival weapon evaluation:
1) hunting practicality
2) defense ability
3) ammo availability
4) maintenance level
5) cost"
A handgun in a fanny pack fails the first miserably.

A handgun is a weapon of compromise/desperation. If you are in a gunfight with only a handgun your planning has failed. Having said that the likely hood of an all out gun fight, even post SHTF, is a rare occurence.

How do I know? Training and practice. Having a rich uncle who provided the ammo helps, BTW.

10 Year old daughter, no clue. Mine missed her 10th by about a week. Her mother on the other hand, well let's just say you don't mess with a momma bear defending her cubs.

Combat, no longer my job. My bug in location is off the beaten path. Again the likelihood of "combat" is low. Checkpoints argument is moot. I'm not going anywhere. Any involvement with a check point will be manning the one at the entrance to the subdivision. Even that possibility is slim.


What is all boils down to is the right tool for the task at hand. A handgun is the tool you have with you all the time. It is not a primary fighting tool. A little perspective. In our patrol trucks we had three choices. The 9mm on the belt, A shotgun and AR carbine in the rack. Primary, by policy, was the Shotgun. Situations where the carbine could be deployed were listed in the policy manual. The handgun was strictly an "OH ****" tool.
You make good points I can’t disagree on that. My handgun comment came from a different post I’ve commenting on so I’m not going to debate it here. But with that said I don’t live out in rural areas, I’m a city/suburban guy who would probably prefer to bug in somewhere I’m familiar with. My mindset though comes from the fact that in a shtf situation no matter where you are things may not go your way, which is why I have several plans in order in case I have to leave in a immediate emergency situation. One of those plans may involve someone to leave behind the more bigger guns because they point a person out of a crowd. That’s where a concealable handgun comes in whether in a iwb holster or a fanny pack holster. That’s what works for me in my environment.

Just because folks live in rural areas doesn’t mean that they’re totally safe from any danger. Many of you folks rely on the national habitat to sustain your settlements. What if Yellow Stone erupted and the gas plumes block out the sky? Historically speaking volcanoes have created mini ice ages around the world disrupting the natural balance. It was a volcano eruption in the South Pacific that caused the Irish potato famine, that’s an event that was caused from the other side of the world. Shtf doesn’t mean bad things happened in the city, we safe in woods. It can be bad things happened in the woods, we need to get to the city where the resources are at. Put like this the states of NY and California spend billions of dollars to help states rural states like Oklahoma and Kansas whenever they get hit with major tornadoes. And to finish this off, how does living in a rural area make you exempt form heart disease?
 

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Si vis pacem, para bellum
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You make good points I can’t disagree on that. My handgun comment came from a different post I’ve commenting on so I’m not going to debate it here. But with that said I don’t live out in rural areas, I’m a city/suburban guy who would probably prefer to bug in somewhere I’m familiar with. My mindset though comes from the fact that in a shtf situation no matter where you are things may not go your way, which is why I have several plans in order in case I have to leave in a immediate emergency situation. One of those plans may involve someone to leave behind the more bigger guns because they point a person out of a crowd. That’s where a concealable handgun comes in whether in a iwb holster or a fanny pack holster. That’s what works for me in my environment.

Just because folks live in rural areas doesn’t mean that they’re totally safe from any danger. Many of you folks rely on the national habitat to sustain your settlements. What if Yellow Stone erupted and the gas plumes block out the sky? Historically speaking volcanoes have created mini ice ages around the world disrupting the natural balance. It was a volcano eruption in the South Pacific that caused the Irish potato famine, that’s an event that was caused from the other side of the world. Shtf doesn’t mean bad things happened in the city, we safe in woods. It can be bad things happened in the woods, we need to get to the city where the resources are at. Put like this the states of NY and California spend billions of dollars to help states rural states like Oklahoma and Kansas whenever they get hit with major tornadoes. And to finish this off, how does living in a rural area make you exempt form heart disease?

The question was specially about HD shotguns in a Survival situation. While they may not be perfect for every use they certainly are far more versatile then most of the other choices.

Heart disease has little to do with my choice of weapons, which are not just limited to firearms, BTW.
 

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What hell, pay attention
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I think a mag fed shotgun is a bad idea. All the reliability issues , low capacity and no reloading to top off as you shoot which is about the only advantage a shotgun has over a rifle.
I havent seen any reliability issues, yet anyway.

The capacity, at least with the AK versions, is no better or worse than the tube fed guns.

I can quickly top off too, and in one fell swoop, just by swapping a mag.
 
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