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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have seen many lists of suggested survival gear where people spend an absolute fortune in gear. I agree with being prepared to a certain degree but at what point does it become a long shot gamble?

To be honest I think it is unlikely that there will an end of the world scenario, it's possible but I think it is very unlikely. It is also possible that you could end up in a large scale disaster but still pretty unlikely.

Isn't it a waste to deplete your savings account to buy a bunch of gear you most likely will never need?

Having a firearm, extra food, backup power, water and some camping/backpacking supplies seems prudent but I can't see myself buying such things as night vision gear, body armor, armored fortresses, years worth of ammunition and various supplies etc.

I think I run more of a risk of financially difficulty later in life by being over prepared for an unlikely event.

I am not trying to disparage anyone, its just my thoughts on the matter when thinking it through.
 

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Closed for the Season.
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I agree with the idea that you should not deplete your ability to survive in the present reality. That means earning a living and setting aside income. Setting aside supplies for bad case scenarios is prudent to the extent that they are things you can make use of now. Though some stuff might be simply be for worse case scenarios and have no daily use.

For instance I put a wood burning stove into my place here last year. When I first built my place 13 years ago, even though my property was heavily wooded, I did not put in a wood stove. Instead I used Electric heat. I had grown tired through the years (since I was old enough to walk) of having to cut and move firewood. The economics of adding a stove and cutting my own wood was not less than simply paying the cost of buying electricity. Indeed it cost me $3000+ in order to have the stove added. However over the 13 years electrical rates have risen and I can now amortize that stove in about 5 years vs the 9yrs when I built. Couple that with the deteriorating economy/ higher risk of electrical loss, I decided to make that investment.

I have been adding extra food to storage that I will eat. Rising cost of that food means that I am spreading the increase cost over a longer cycle. On the subject of guns. I have several because they were a major hobby for me when I was younger. I do not stock a ton of ammo other than what might be normally needed for hunting and target shooting. Anything more seems odd.

I do wonder from reading some of the prepper sites that some of the folks that get involved with extreme preparation are not being just prudent but are Hoarders. The stuff they have bought will go to waste because they can not possibly make use of it. Or worse they do not even no what they have since they simply keep stuffing things away.

Like any investment you need to weigh the potential risks against the potential gains and judge accordingly.
 

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CrackShot
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I would in no way spend my life savings on survival gear, that being said you need to buy what you think would be your immediate SHTF scenerio, stock up on food (you actually eat) water, Meds, these are things you will use anyway, when you use something replace it (always rotate), then once you have what you think will surrfice then you can start accumalting other items ie. firearms, camping gear, etc. spend what you can on what you need, and you'll be better off than most. just think of it as a life insurence policy:thumb:
 

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I set aside a percentage of my income specifically for preps three years ago,I didn't try to do it overnight,and prepped for what I thought would be prudent.This forum runs from the economy collapsing to it's a beautiful day.Plan your preps so you are comfortable,my BOV helped me during the floods,my garden keeps my food budget low,etc.

You make valid points,prep to the level you are comfortable with,Rambo was a good movie.
 

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I see a bad moon arising
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I have seen many lists of suggested survival gear where people spend an absolute fortune in gear. I agree with being prepared to a certain degree but at what point does it become a long shot gamble?

To be honest I think it is unlikely that there will an end of the world scenario, it's possible but I think it is very unlikely. It is also possible that you could end up in a large scale disaster but still pretty unlikely.

Isn't it a waste to deplete your savings account to buy a bunch of gear you most likely will never need?

Having a firearm, extra food, backup power, water and some camping/backpacking supplies seems prudent but I can't see myself buying such things as night vision gear, body armor, armored fortresses, years worth of ammunition and various supplies etc.

I think I run more of a risk of financially difficulty later in life by being over prepared for an unlikely event.

I am not trying to disparage anyone, its just my thoughts on the matter when thinking it through.

I think you've got a very well balanced perspective on it. :thumb:

A survival mindset is about preparing for a variety of unknowns.

One of those unknown possible outcomes is just like you said -- nothing happens.
No falling skies, no zombie uprisings, no civilization crushing event.
You keep your job, you retire, and live a happy life off your retirement
plan and/or 401K savings.

So I agree completely -- Prep -- but in moderation. Play the odds.
What are the chances that you might at some point in the future get
caught up in an earthquake, hurricane, ice storm / prolonged power outage?
Depends on your location obviously, but the odds of a "minor" event like
that is pretty darn good. Store up some preps for that at a minimum.
Store up some water and some reserve food. Couple of weeks maybe.
Get a gun -- know how to use it. Then from there you can decide how
much further you want to take this. Its all just a matter of what lets you
sleep at night.

Also depends a lot on how much disposable income you have. If you're
having trouble making your rent payment, and are up to your gills in debt,
then no, you shouldn't be spending your money on body armor. On the other
hand, if you got zero debt, steady job, plenty of savings, then does it
really do you that much good to add another $500 to your already large
stash of money? Diminishing returns at that point. Maybe some body
armor in the closet is a better possible investment (albiet a long shot) than
squirrelling away another chunk of cash.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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There can be a happy medium. A person can have balanced preps without spending a fortune. I can't see the expense of armored fortresses and such either. Whether body armor and night vision would be important depends on a person's location and what they forsee as far as violence and hostilities. I used to sell night vision as part of my merchandise line, so keeping a few for myself wasn't a big deal. But in my particular situation, I feel it may be useful.

The most important things are of course shelter, food and water, first aid and meds, and a way to protect it all. Self sufficiency is the only true long term prep. So that's why a lot of people are talking about buying land and such. Living out of the cities is also makes for a very positive lifestyle change. So even if nothing happens, it has been a beneficial use of money for the family.
 

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just me and mine
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Like other posters on here, it depends on what your financial situation is, and what your prepping for.

My personal situation allows for less than $100/month for preps. A buddy of mine has $1000/month to spend. I am prepping for anything I can think will happen. He thinks we will be invaded. My point is, if you feel the need to spend every last penny on preps, that's your personal call. No one should tell you how and what to spend.
 

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Patient Zero of WWZ
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I have seen many lists of suggested survival gear where people spend an absolute fortune in gear.
I think I run more of a risk of financially difficulty later in life by being over prepared for an unlikely event.

I am not trying to disparage anyone, its just my thoughts on the matter when thinking it through.

All things in moderation, All things in balance.

You don't take food from your babies mouths today so they can have food in case the world ends. But it is good to prepare for that SHTF scenario, first prepare for the ones likely to hit you, then for the less likely ones.

Much of the gear you buy today can be resold years from now by you or your estate. "What am I offered for this vintage Glock pistol, well cared for, mint condition, Bidding starts at $1500."

Much of the food a prepper puts away today could be eaten during retirement, if the world doesn't end before then. And of course most preppers store the things they use daily and simply rotate stock. So it isn't just wasted sitting in the basement.

That very compete camping set-up that you refer to as a BOB. Can bring years of fun on family camping and fishing trips. Not to mention all the free fish you get to eat. Just restock it so it's ready for the next trip or TEOTW, whichever comes first.

And in the end the warm fuzzy feeling you have knowing that you are prepared to see your family through whatever disaster may happen is priceless.

Just keep it real, live your regular life and prepare in a level headed way.
 

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Preps are like insurance, how much coverage do you think you need? What you prep for and what someone else preps for is dependent on your personal view of what might happen. Some are prepared for a tornado. Some are prepared for an economic collapse. Kinda like picking the right car to drive. It is all personal opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't think I am trying to tell people how to spend, I am just raising the strong possibility that could be all for nothing, that you should also prepare for the rest of your life in an intact civilization.

Since I like backpacking and camping I don't consider any of those purchases potentially useless, I try to couple my purchases with existing hobbies.
 

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If you bought preps solely for the purpose of protecting against TEOTWAWKI, it would be foolish in the extreme to spend all your savings on preps. The chance you will use them is small. Budget accordingly.
 

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just me and mine
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Much of the gear you buy today can be resold years from now by you or your estate. "What am I offered for this vintage Glock pistol, well cared for, mint condition, Bidding starts at $1500."
Exactly right. Everything will keep its value to someone.

If you pass away, and your family doesn't want the preps, there will be auctions, or yard sales, and I can guarantee most of your preps will be sold. Maybe not for what they were purchased for, maybe more, maybe less, but your family will still get "use" out of them.

So basically every purchase, prep wise, is a good one. Whether for you, your family, friends, or someone driving by the yard sale/auction....
 

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17 Oaks Ranch Tx
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I have seen many lists of suggested survival gear where people spend an absolute fortune in gear. I agree with being prepared to a certain degree but at what point does it become a long shot gamble?

To be honest I think it is unlikely that there will an end of the world scenario, it's possible but I think it is very unlikely. It is also possible that you could end up in a large scale disaster but still pretty unlikely.

Isn't it a waste to deplete your savings account to buy a bunch of gear you most likely will never need?

Having a firearm, extra food, backup power, water and some camping/backpacking supplies seems prudent but I can't see myself buying such things as night vision gear, body armor, armored fortresses, years worth of ammunition and various supplies etc.

I think I run more of a risk of financially difficulty later in life by being over prepared for an unlikely event.

I am not trying to disparage anyone, its just my thoughts on the matter when thinking it through.
I am about 99% in agreement with you...HOWEVER, most gear you will someday need, its really a matter of holding on to it till that day rolls around. Then there is the DEGREE of gear. Gear A sells for $40 bucks at Wally World, Gear AA sells for $140 bucks from REI. They do same and are of generally equal quality, one may be steel, the other stainless steel. One stamped Wally World, one stamped REI for Profession use ONLY!

We can see this in ruck sacks, knives, boots etc etc. Most of my gear is US military issue, its RUGGED, inexpensive and unlike a lot of stuff it WORKS. On occasion you can buy better and or more functional, but that is far from the rule.

Secondly the question of how much gear? While I stated that ALL gear can fill a need at some point in time, buying it today only fills a WANT, NOT a need.

Then the question of how much gear to have becomes simple to answer. What you can carry*, no more, no less any more than that, like any more than a mouthful is a waste.

There are plenty of folks on here that are either 18 wheel drivers or intend to be because when they pull out, its gonna take an 18 wheeler just to haul there BOB, let alone all the other stuff they intend taking.

* what you can carry...in the rucksack x 20% of body weight, then whatever you add on, strap on, weapon, basic load, knives etc. This also requires you be in some kind of physical condition just to haul this. Most will not get much further than the local park and collapse of near exhaustion when they do. A conditioned Infantry soldier can do 25km on day 1, cross country trails, mostly flat terrain, subsequent days will be about 15km. Add in rain, mud, hills, pure cross country with little or no trails and cut in half.

Take Away: Your life savings in gear is sitting back at home in the basement. What if you exit via a BOV...again this ONLY works if your BOV takes you to your BOL doorstep. Leave it in the bed of your BOV truck and don't it expect it or the BOV to be there tomorrow.

BUY, good quality gear, good don't come cheap and cheap don't come good. But fancy labels from fancy stores don't make it good. THINK FUNCTIONALITY FIRST, the grade for reliability and consider replacement parts or support requirements. That neat flash light that only uses batteries you can get from NASA may not cut it.
 

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Finacial preparedness is just another senareo to prep for. You should be balancing what you spend to cover today's living expenses, save some for tomorrow's retirement and allot funds to cover preps for those items you feel cover what likley disasters. There is supporting arguments for both spending everything today on preps as well as saving in a 401K for later in life. If we prep for events that are likley to occur. Hopefully one of those is that we all live a long health life, retire and enjoy our golden years. Saving for tomorrow is just another prep....
 

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Patient Zero of WWZ
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Exactly right. Everything will keep its value to someone.

If you pass away, and your family doesn't want the preps, there will be auctions, or yard sales, and I can guarantee most of your preps will be sold. Maybe not for what they were purchased for, maybe more, maybe less, but your family will still get "use" out of them.

So basically every purchase, prep wise, is a good one. Whether for you, your family, friends, or someone driving by the yard sale/auction....
:) And when you get too old and can't see to shoot, you can sell your guns to pay for cataract surgery.

Seriously with a little thought, very little of your preps will truly go to waste.
 

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Patient Zero of WWZ
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We can see this in ruck sacks, knives, boots etc etc. Most of my gear is US military issue, its RUGGED, inexpensive and unlike a lot of stuff it WORKS. On occasion you can buy better and or more functional, but that is far from the rule.
Your statement about the price and ruggedness of molle gear made me do some looking into it. I had always avoided military surplus gear because I can't think of any scenario where looking like military or para-military would be good.

I have always gone with civilian camo, or something that blends in. Even my GHB is in a soft sided 6 pack cooler and a Cabellas soft side briefcase. Something I would not look out of place carrying in a mall or a grocery store.

Also my previous experience with military packs was with ALICE gear. Which never impressed me.

But I looked up the army manual on molle gear and it looks like some good stuff.

http://northidaho21lightfoot.org/files/molle_care-use_1999.pdf


I do need to upsize my BOB. (mostly thanks to things I have learned here) I'm going to look more closely at surplus molle.

Thanks for the push.
 
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