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It seems the main focus of most survivalists is to prepare for sharply defined, suddenly-realized life-changing events... natural disasters, social unrest, foreign (or domestic) occupation - that kind of stuff.

But considering todays economic climate in the states, it seems to me that the most likely survival scenario will be adjusting to a severly depressed economy. For some, that may be a sudden life-changing event. For others, a gradual decline in the standard of living. And for some - an opportunity.

So my question is - have any of you thought about how you might survive - and maybe even prosper - in such a changing economy? Assuming the S doesn't completely HTF, are you prepared, or are preparing, to make a niche for yourself in an economy that may struggle, but still survive?

My personal answer to this question is yes. Right now, our main source of income is through retail sales, which is a tough business to be in anytime, especially in our industry, but especially so now. Our focus in the coming year will be to transition towards providing more quality services at discount prices. These are services that we feel will be in great demand even with a weakened economy.

Thoughts?
 

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woefully unprepared
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And not all of of financial viablity revolves around increasing or maintaining your cash flow. You can do just as well by fixing any leaks in your income stream. It's just as effective to save a dollar spent unneccessarily than to look for a way to earn an extra dollar.
 

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This has been on my mind as well. If we hit a serious depression-like scenario, I'm hoping food preps to help. Barring that, we have a few dollars socked away and I'm toying with wealth preservation.
I know there are a lot of gold bugs out there but some charts I saw did not really show gold as being the great savior during severe economic times.
I've also thought about buying foreign currency (Euros, Yen) as I'm pretty sure the almighty dollar will lose value. But will the other currencies.

I haven't been able to find much advice in "mainstream" economic sites so I'm interested in what others are thinking about also.
 

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Yes some people will be ready for the slow decline and even make a decent buck out of it.
As well as some will get to the point of being quite wealthy that are so called (over prepaired) - not possible but in anycase, the ones that are prepaired to live for years on what they have now and will know how to manage what they have will be the new upper class. All the wallstreet big pocket a-- holios will be the ones on the street soon wondering why did they squander all of that oil money away on 300k worth of one car.

I am pretty excited to see it my self..
Twisted but hey they need to be taken down a peg or two. :eight: Cough Cough
 

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If you think about it, it's ALL good economic moves-

Year supply of food, put away at today's prices. You eat it years from now at tomorrow's food prices, you are saving a LOT of money that way.

Rural land where you can have a real go at food production- not necessarily to be a farmer or to try to "make money" off of, but to fulfill your OWN food needs. Cuts grocery bills.

Owning your place debt free- as you should a survival retreat- allows you to be free from the burden of a monthly mortgage payment.

Having an AE system means you don't have an electric bill- or a much smaller one.

Having some fuel stored means you can opt out of buying gas for a while when times are tough and/or when gas hits $4. or more a gallon again.

Most preps will be helpful to you on a daily basis, not "just" for TEOTWAWKI.

Most will not per se "make" you money, but if done right, they will SAVE you a pile of money. :thumb:

Staying out of debt is half the battle. Being humble in order to accept work you may think "below" you, might be the difference between having NO money coming in and having SOME money coming in.

Diversify your skill sets. That doesn't just mean being able to start a fire without matches type stuff, it also means WORK related skills.

Have the right "people skills" to be able to get a job when others are complaining that they can't find one.

Just some random thoughts. :)

Lowdown3
 

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To secure peace is to...
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It seems the main focus of most survivalists is to prepare for sharply defined, suddenly-realized life-changing events... natural disasters, social unrest, foreign (or domestic) occupation - that kind of stuff.

But considering todays economic climate in the states, it seems to me that the most likely survival scenario will be adjusting to a severly depressed economy. For some, that may be a sudden life-changing event. For others, a gradual decline in the standard of living. And for some - an opportunity.

So my question is - have any of you thought about how you might survive - and maybe even prosper - in such a changing economy? Assuming the S doesn't completely HTF, are you prepared, or are preparing, to make a niche for yourself in an economy that may struggle, but still survive?

My personal answer to this question is yes. Right now, our main source of income is through retail sales, which is a tough business to be in anytime, especially in our industry, but especially so now. Our focus in the coming year will be to transition towards providing more quality services at discount prices. These are services that we feel will be in great demand even with a weakened economy.

Thoughts?
I'm 27, I've got a Roth IRA, I've got a 401K and my company offers a pension. I have a savings account and I have some hidden cash in a couple of locations. I have life insurance, great health, dental, eye, prescription, cancer, and accident insurance as well as short and long term disability.

I also realize that in a huge economic downturn that hyperinflation may cause my savings and investments to be worth crap. So therefore I've invested in preparing for survival. No matter what happens, I have ammo, guns, food, clothes, and tools.

My job is fairly secure (of course I could lose it tomorrow) but I've got college degrees, certifications, a lot of marketable skills, and a healthy resume. Part of my general survivalibility has been to invest in myself as a productive and sought after engineer. If all of that collapses I have big enough biceps to dig ditches, cut down trees, or be a trash collector and will-power strong enough to not give in, ever.
 
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