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pro religion atheist
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Near my house is a "soup kitchen". I am aquainted with one woman who lives there who comes out into the alley to smoke. We talk and I give her blackberry cobblers or whatever I am making that day. Makes for friendly relations.

Also nearby is a major homeless shelter that sleeps about 150.

I Decided to ask the lady if they had an emergancy preparedness plan and she looked confused. I used a major earthquake such as japans to illustrate. I explained I was trying to organize a preparedness plan for a third party and wondered if the homeless would be an impact. ( I did not use the term zombies by the way) She waved her hand at their storage room and said "we have plenty of food". I asked about it running out and where would they get more. She mentioned some central food bank agency resupplying them. I never could get her to admit that she would ever run out.
I asked how many she feeds a day. About 50 on a food stamp/beginning of the month day, and 250 towards the end of the month.

The odd part was that she started to talk about how prepared she was and started to tell me all about her food preps at home, emergancy equipment and etc. I could not get her to see it at work though.

I decided we will have zombies.

I imagine that there are many food bank and soup kitchens around the tacoma area and that the poor farmers in the Puyallup valley are going to be over run. I imagine any city is the same.

Whats the main point? Who knows. Thought I would just throw that conversation out there for folks to think about.
 

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Indefatigable
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Having been homeless and soup kitchen patron myself....It's really hard to make ANY plans for the future when you don't know when your next meal will be of if you will find a safe place to sleep anytime soon. It is odd that she preps at home, but can't understand that there will be a problem at work when TSHTF. I am not trying to be tacky here, but some of our soup kitchens are staffed by mentally challanged people, who are giving back to their communities and learning some life skills at the same time. Maybe this is why she dosen't understand?
 

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Patient Zero of WWZ
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I imagine that there are many food bank and soup kitchens around the tacoma area and that the poor farmers in the Puyallup valley are going to be over run. I imagine any city is the same.
Meaning no disrespect for your soup kitchen lady or anyone, I wonder how many people will actually be bright enough to run for the hills.

People always have a hard time accepting that what they have always known has changed. People refuse to evacuate ahead of a hurricane because they believe "it won't happen to me", "it can't happen here".

Many will be like this woman expecting the government or "some central food bank agency" to resupply them.

Many will probably starve sitting in line at the food bank unable to understand that there ain't no food and there ain't none coming.

I wonder how many others will just sit in the city or in their homes waiting for help.

We may not see those hungry hordes trying to take our stored preps after all.
 

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But see, that is a good thing for those of us that prep and do not live in a city. The sheeple will be waiting in lines for food (which they could live without for weeks) when and/or if they realise they dont have water and desparately need it they will have waited too long. Three days for water. Even if they have soda or beer or some bottled water it wont last but a few days. By the time they realise they need to leave they will be too late. Giving them only one or two days of activity before they are done.
 

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Indefatigable
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Although not new to prepping, I am new here. I used to wonder about raiders (zombies as you call them) but not any more. The one thing I have learned here is that all I have to do is keep my head down for a few weeks and all the people just waiting for SHTF so they can start killing will take care of them for me.
 
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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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The one thing I have learned here is that all I have to do is keep my head down for a few weeks and all the people just waiting for SHTF so they can start killing will take care of them for me.
I wouldn't bet your life on that. One thing I've learned is that the mind tends to play tricks on us when we're fantasizing about things like that. Ever notice in their shootout fantasies how the bad guy's bullets never hit, but theirs do? I've talked to a lot of people about this very thing, who, after thinking about it for a minute, admitted that in their fantasies, the same thing happens. It's pretty normal for our imagination to do that I guess.
 

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If and when the shtf, there will be a ton of people heading for the hills or the country. For some reason, people think living in the country is like living in a Disney movie. They think we all have big fat slabs of free bacon that just fall from the sky into our frying pans when we are hungry or blue birds just deliver us their egg's to cook for breakfast. I get worried about how many people will head this way when things get real bad. I hope not too many come. They will be looking to take and not trade, I am sure.
 

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Well I really don't know what the question is but personally I've had a lot of bad experiences with homeless people.

Many are criminals, addicts or mentally unbalanced. I wouldn't trust them as far as I could spit.

They are a problem now and will be even worse and in greater numbers post SHTF.

If I was the OP I'd try to move out of the area asap.
 

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If and when the shtf, there will be a ton of people heading for the hills or the country.
I think, some people may want to go to the country and live off the land but others I think will just be traveling through. Just refugees heading to another town that they heard there were jobs and food. I also think many people from the larger cities are going to head to the burbs and set up shanty towns. This is my BIL and I will not stand for this, they will have to move along.

But as some one else said, many will stay and wait for the government to come and save them.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Many Soup Kitchens and other non-profits are barely able to meet their financial responsibilities on a daily basis... I would imagine it being very difficult (not impossible) for them to prep...


RJ
We have to ask the tough question. Do we really want soup kitchens to prepare anyway? What possible purpose would it serve for the homeless to survive a SHTF crisis? I hate to be cold blooded about it, but they're not serving a purpose right now. They'd just be an additional burden then.
 

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Spyder Rider
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I would think that the homeless are more capable of surviving without support than most non homeless. As a result of their lifestyle, the weakest and completely dependent humans among them have already died. They've also already adjusted emotionally to living without comfort and convenience.
We often said back in the 60's that after a nuclear war only the cockroches and winos would survive.
 

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Back of beyond!
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I would think that the homeless are more capable of surviving without support than most non homeless. As a result of their lifestyle, the weakest and completely dependent humans among them have already died. They've also already adjusted emotionally to living without comfort and convenience.
Excellent post, CC. I was homeless once, and it was no picnic. A homeless person MUST learn to live with very few comforts and conveniences.
Emotionally too, a homeless person has to learn to overcome loneliness, rejection, low self-esteem, hopelessness, and just plain mental depression.

It hardens a person, on the inside and outside, and makes them better-able to adjust to very uncomfortable situations socially and economically.

Being homeless was also useful in learning how to evade and protect yourself against predatory humans, and at times, mean spirited LEOs.

And in a SHTF scenario, a person would certainly have some adjustment to get used to. A person who was used to living in a relatively safe and comfortable home environment would be shocked and appalled at the outset.

I WAS when I was first on the street. It was culture shock to the extreme.
All in all, it was a useful experience, though unpleasant at times.
 
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