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patriarch
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I've already bought a number of things but due to limited storage (just moved from a house to a townhouse and lost 1000 sq ft of space not to mention my attic storage) I have not gotten as much as I feel I'd need, and I am interested in hearing what people, like you Monique, have to offer as far as ideas that I may not have thought about.
I have the following:
Rice, canned and dry beans, water purification methods, a metric ** ton of hygiene supplies, a man made portable shower made from a Home Depot bucket and PVC fittings (I'm big on cleanliness), spices, lots of salt, sugar, pasta, plenty of liquor, canned vegetables, honey, batteries, radios, matches and lighters to make fire, medications for all kinds of ** (not OTC stuff either), ways to neutralize hostiles, lots of rope and knowledge of how to tie knots, multiple types of cutting tools, propane stoves, cooking oils, hand tools, and ways to store water.

So, I've not been sleepwalking through the past few years like some have suggested. Some of you have more experience in this stuff than I do and thus the question. I like hearing and reading about new ideas and ways I can care for my family when the SHTF.

I want to thank all of you for your suggestions and contributions. I have certainly learned a few things and gained some new ideas. I sometimes take the easy way out and just ask you all about your thoughts/experiences instead of reading all the wealth of information that is here. I work full time and am also a student right now and thus I'm busier than a 1 legged man in an ass kicking contest.
Sounds like your already on the right track. Enough already? I been doing this all my life and I can say you will never have enough. Eating healthy, trying to raise your food if possible, and stay away from processed foods. I still work on many projects, never finish any project that I say, one more tool would have made it easier. So, there never is an end to it. I try to categorize different elements of self sufficientincy, so not to forget something. For example, canning food. I list all the tools required to do that. Even processing meats. Then gardening. Tools to do that, even seeds. I do this with all topics of importance. Hope this helps. Good luck.
 

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Bags of wheat, a Corona grinder, sifter, lard, salt, yeast, a camp dutch oven, charcoal and this recipe:
Very important. Bread is one thing that people don't seem to get tired of eating. Lots of us have some with every meal. Can't say the same thing about beans and rice.

Things to spread upon the bread may become a problem.
 

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We spent a few years with bean, rice, and corn being the bulk of our diet. To the point that our younger kids will ask for plain white rice or plain beans and have seconds and thirds of them if we cool a meal they dont like.

So I stock lots of rice, beans, corn and wheat, and I have very little worry that the kids will eat them if it becomes necessary.

All of those take a lot of cooking time and fuel. So I also keep several months worth of canned goods, and things that dont require cooking.
 

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Brown and white rice, multiple different kinds of dried beans, and tinned meats. I put a variety of them in each bucket with oxygen absorbers and seal the bucket. Olive and coconut oil, Mac and cheese, canned ham and chicken, dried seasoning and spices. All this from normal grocery stores. I've got other long term storage laid in from other sources.
 

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I know mac and cheese the powdered cheese goes bad, its not meant for very long storage. Do you use Mylar and have you checked results? I'm curious about that and your oil storage.
 

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I've already bought a number of things but due to limited storage (just moved from a house to a townhouse and lost 1000 sq ft of space not to mention my attic storage) I have not gotten as much as I feel I'd need, and I am interested in hearing what people, like you Monique, have to offer as far as ideas that I may not have thought about.
I have the following:
<snip>

I want to thank all of you for your suggestions and contributions. I have certainly learned a few things and gained some new ideas. I sometimes take the easy way out and just ask you all about your thoughts/experiences instead of reading all the wealth of information that is here. I work full time and am also a student right now and thus I'm busier than a 1 legged man in an ass kicking contest.
I apologize if my remark seemed harsh. Your post gave me the impression you were just starting out and it seemed odd for someone who has been here a while! I’m relieved to hear that you’re so well supplied (way ahead of me in a few areas, in fact.) Have done the work+school thing myself, so I understand how it is.
 

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I've already bought a number of things but due to limited storage (just moved from a house to a townhouse and lost 1000 sq ft of space not to mention my attic storage) I have not gotten as much as I feel I'd need, and I am interested in hearing what people, like you Monique, have to offer as far as ideas that I may not have thought about.
I have the following:
Rice, canned and dry beans, water purification methods, a metric ** ton of hygiene supplies, a man made portable shower made from a Home Depot bucket and PVC fittings (I'm big on cleanliness), spices, lots of salt, sugar, pasta, plenty of liquor, canned vegetables, honey, batteries, radios, matches and lighters to make fire, medications for all kinds of ** (not OTC stuff either), ways to neutralize hostiles, lots of rope and knowledge of how to tie knots, multiple types of cutting tools, propane stoves, cooking oils, hand tools, and ways to store water.

So, I've not been sleepwalking through the past few years like some have suggested. Some of you have more experience in this stuff than I do and thus the question. I like hearing and reading about new ideas and ways I can care for my family when the SHTF.

I want to thank all of you for your suggestions and contributions. I have certainly learned a few things and gained some new ideas. I sometimes take the easy way out and just ask you all about your thoughts/experiences instead of reading all the wealth of information that is here. I work full time and am also a student right now and thus I'm busier than a 1 legged man in an ass kicking contest.
The trick is to store what you enjoy, then eat what you store.

It becomes problematic to answer broad based questions regarding what folks should store because of individuals preferences, or allergies.

An idea might be for you to log EVERYTHING you eat and drink over defined period of time. Several weeks to a month.

After that time frame, look over the list. Stock up on store packaged analogues/equivalents, when in special, which also have reasonable best by dating. Then eat what you end up stocking, thereby not wasting money.

Doing such COULD give you a decent varied diet of things YOU enjoy, stocked up on months out...and saving money.

Its of no benefit to stock up on things, even on special, if you won't enjoy them. Then inevitably be wasting them. HOPEFULLY donating them before the BB date.
 
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Unfortunately I’m priced out. I fall over whenever I see the pricing on #10 cans. I have had some before though, Thrive Life was delicious!
Check LDS Bishops Store House / Home Storage Center, if you have one near you. Reasonably priced long term storage foods, mostly #10 canned. Not freeze dried. Just simple basics to use as fillers & build recipes around.

Least expensive is to buy bulk (or from the source) foods which are known to store long term & do the oxygen absorber Mylar bagged route yourself. Not difficult.

However, this thread isn't about long-term storage foods. More about short to mid-term, by the OP's request. Focusing on store bought / consumer packaging. So months to likely 2 years, depending (staying within the bounds of BB dating).
 

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Firefighter 129
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377 Posts
I'm thinking that I may want to get some supplies that will store for a long time just in case the SHTF. I'm thinking of various rice flavors, dried and canned beans, spices cooking oils, pasta etc. What else would you buy and why? Thanks.
Buy garlic, tumeric, and pepper seeds. I grow avocados from pits I recycle to my compost. I grow lots of ginger and tumeric both for seasoning and medicine. Peppers are great for relieving pain. I grow a lot of our food then can it. I have a dehydrator and a solar oven.
 

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Firefighter 129
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377 Posts
Maybe plain instant mashed potatoes keep, not the ones with added butter, cheese, and other ingredients.
Whole grain cornmeal goes bad pretty quick, I keep in fridge or freezer. You might have better luck with degerminated cornmeal but whole grain tastes much better and has better nutrition. Or store whole grain and mill it just before use like Indians did. You might read up on nixtilmization to prevent pelagra when eating a corn heavy diet. A limited non varying diet can lead to deficiency even with enough calories.
True but potatoes are very easy to grow. They are a gift that keeps on giving.
 

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Firefighter 129
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377 Posts
Rice and chicken bouillon. I also store popcorn to grind and make fried cakes with. They have found edible corn in clay pots of indian pueblos 100 yrs old... if I remember right.
Acorns make great flour as well. My people (Cherokee) use to soak acorns in streams to clean the tannin out of the acorns. Then we would grind them into flour. I pick up acorns and dump them for the squirrels. Squirrels then plant acorns for me every 10 or so feet from the looks of it. I have oak trees popping up all through the pine forest around me. Oak is great in seasoning smoke meat as well as using in our fireplace.
 

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Comic, not your lawyer!
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15,112 Posts
I like to think in stages, and one has to MARK items with dates, and ROTATE thru stock. Marking them with dates is key to this exercise IMO.

Immediate term is the fresh foods we use to get our health up. This is the stuff in your fridge and pantry that will go bad fairly soon if not used. Take advantage of fresh food while they are available.

Short term is the stuff in your freezer or canned goods, 1-3 years. Supplement fresh foods by rotating thru these canned goods.

Long term is the stockpiles of rice, beans, dry goods, some canned goods, etc. that can last 5-10 years. Glass jars, canning, etc. are really good for this. You might learn to can, even if you have to get your food from the organic markets and can them. A fun hobby if you're into it, and can extend your pantry with some long term foods.

Very long term is the "survival" foods that need to be rehydrated. We're talking 10-20+ year shelf lives. Record when you buy these, and rotate thru them when they near expiration. I've found the best are Mountain House of which I have several months of "meals" of on hand, I've purchased (but never tried) the Auguson Farms based on ratings and recommendations - powdered pancake mixes, milk, eggs, etc. I don't have any freeze dried Thrive but I've tasted their veggies and fruits which were good.

Outside of that, water, water, water. Potable, and non-potable is important too (not needed to be super clean filtered for drinking but for toilet, bathing, washing clothing, etc.)
 

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Firefighter 129
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377 Posts
I like to think in stages, and one has to MARK items with dates, and ROTATE thru stock. Marking them with dates is key to this exercise IMO.

Immediate term is the fresh foods we use to get our health up. This is the stuff in your fridge and pantry that will go bad fairly soon if not used. Take advantage of fresh food while they are available.

Short term is the stuff in your freezer or canned goods, 1-3 years. Supplement fresh foods by rotating thru these canned goods.

Long term is the stockpiles of rice, beans, dry goods, some canned goods, etc. that can last 5-10 years. Glass jars, canning, etc. are really good for this. You might learn to can, even if you have to get your food from the organic markets and can them. A fun hobby if you're into it, and can extend your pantry with some long term foods.

Very long term is the "survival" foods that need to be rehydrated. We're talking 10-20+ year shelf lives. Record when you buy these, and rotate thru them when they near expiration. I've found the best are Mountain House of which I have several months of "meals" of on hand, I've purchased (but never tried) the Auguson Farms based on ratings and recommendations - powdered pancake mixes, milk, eggs, etc. I don't have any freeze dried Thrive but I've tasted their veggies and fruits which were good.

Outside of that, water, water, water. Potable, and non-potable is important too (not needed to be super clean filtered for drinking but for toilet, bathing, washing clothing, etc.)
Water is absolutely key. We have a 22 ft by 52 inch above ground pool. Holds 10,472 gallons of water. We can use it for drinking if need be but it's mainly for the horses and chickens. We have a creek on the property as well as rain barrels for irrigation. People stand in lines for water after a natural disaster. We have to have water to survive. Great points in your reply.
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
I apologize if my remark seemed harsh. Your post gave me the impression you were just starting out and it seemed odd for someone who has been here a while! I’m relieved to hear that you’re so well supplied (way ahead of me in a few areas, in fact.) Have done the work+school thing myself, so I understand how it is.
It's all good.
 
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