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ive done some remodeling of our home and installed my woodstove again (winter is coming) but...
how can i check that there's no CO2 leaking out of it?
i dont know someone with a CO2meter
theres no smoke leaking frome what i see but i want to know for sure
 

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Getting back to the original question, I think you mean CO, not CO2. What you want is an inexpensive carbon monoxide detector. Here in the US we have hardware stores like Home Depot that sell easy to install battery operated CO detectors. They're squat cylinders approximately 15 cm in diameter that you typically mount on the ceiling of the room to be protected. I bought several for 20$US. Here's an example of what my local store sells.
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs...1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053&Ntpc=1&Ntpr=1

I have wood, kerosene, and gasoline appliances in my cabin. The gasoline and wood stoves never set off the detector. The kerosene heater did. As long as the draft on your stove appears to draw the smoke up the chimney, I don't think there is any need to worry about CO buildup inside your home. Still, a 20 dollar bill is cheap for the peace of mind you'll have as you go to sleep with your wood stove burning.
 

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I have a carbon monoxide detector in a hallway near the center of the house.

You could go the old fashion route and use a Canary bird.
 

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Getting back to the original question, I think you mean CO, not CO2. What you want is an inexpensive carbon monoxide detector. Here in the US we have hardware stores like Home Depot that sell easy to install battery operated CO detectors. They're squat cylinders approximately 15 cm in diameter that you typically mount on the ceiling of the room to be protected. I bought several for 20$US. Here's an example of what my local store sells.
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs...1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053&Ntpc=1&Ntpr=1

I have wood, kerosene, and gasoline appliances in my cabin. The gasoline and wood stoves never set off the detector. The kerosene heater did. As long as the draft on your stove appears to draw the smoke up the chimney, I don't think there is any need to worry about CO buildup inside your home. Still, a 20 dollar bill is cheap for the peace of mind you'll have as you go to sleep with your wood stove burning.

This is good advice.....heed it.
 

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Be Careful With Wood Stove Installation And Why

I'm a retarded-er-retired Firefighter with the usual burn scars and let me tell you...burning hurts. Also have recovered victums of fire, CO and smoke inhalation overdoses and they are quite dead believe me.

Out here in SW Oregon, we "MUST" use a "certified" wood stove in nearly all new installations; the only exceptions being in a garage, barn, outbuilding or workshop away and separate from the home.

The Oregon building code works. We must use approved triple wall piping from the ceiling up thru the attic and up thru the roof and on up to the tip of the installation, capped with the proper top.

A "certified" stove means that the stove manufacture must show to the State of Oregon that their products burns clean with strict no/little smoke output and that they will not gas the interior with CO.

In addition, their are STRICTER requirements for a "Mobile Home" wood stove. These stoves require that the inlet air going INTO the stove must be ducted to and draw from the area BENEATH the floor of the mobile home.

I only used Mobile Home certified wood stoves in my 4 applications used. The reason is that having been burned a little alot, I don't want to burn totally up at once, or die of CO poisoning at all.

Make sure the installation is air tight. I did away with the dampers as they are not needed and it tightens up the flue pipe from the stove up to the ceiling. No gas can excape as everything is sealed.

Bolting the stove to the floor makes sense. The stoves will "walk" over time due to the expansion/contraction of the units being employeed over years.
I also used a PET FENCE around the stove.

Burn only clean DRY hardwood. Softwood in a pinch, but it must be very dry. Surprisingly, RAIN soaked DRY hardwood burns just fine after it steams a little bit. DRY softwood works dandy for cooking quickly.

Cleaning out the flue YEARLY is a real good idea. Don't get lazy here. Just hire out a good "CHIMMENY SWEEP" to do it for you. Gunk builds up along with bird, roddent and hornet nests. HB of CJ (old coot) (ex FF PM RN)

(Glitch in Paragraphs?)
 

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ive done some remodeling of our home and installed my woodstove again (winter is coming) but...
how can i check that there's no CO2 leaking out of it?
i dont know someone with a CO2meter
theres no smoke leaking frome what i see but i want to know for sure
Is this a gas burner? A wood stove requires fresh air intake and draft to operate. Without that it would either smoke into the house or just go out. If there is a draft and smoke is venting from the chimney, then there is almost no chance of any carbon monoxide going from the stove to the interior of the house.

If this is a gas setup then it's a different story. Either way, MichaelK's advice for a carbon monoxide detector is lifesaving. Every home should at least one.
 

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ive done some remodeling of our home and installed my woodstove again (winter is coming) but...
how can i check that there's no CO2 leaking out of it?
i dont know someone with a CO2meter
theres no smoke leaking frome what i see but i want to know for sure
when a wood stove is properly installed. the back pressure of the hot gasses escaping the stove pipe suck household air into the stove and do not permit excessive leakage back into the structure
 
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