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I'm not a doctor, but I've been reading medical journals for about fifteen years to get a handle on my wife's disease (and have enough organic chemistry background to understand some of it), and have developed a fair sense for whether an article was published in bad faith (and oh boy are some published in bad faith).

My impression is that most studies published about the coronavirus are published in good faith. Medical researchers are taking it very, very seriously, and that's one of the reasons I'm deeply skeptical of the conspiracy theories making the rounds about the coronavirus.
This is a pretty valid argument IMO which is why i referenced back to the post I made earlier.

My GUT feeling is telling me there is definitely something afoot that has alot of people scared.
I get that.

but given the narrative as of late I don't trust much of ANYTHING the media says.
(Not that I don't believe something is there legitimately, or the seriousness level. ) What I am thinking is that most simply do not know, and the narrative they told us is being slaughtered by this latest development.

When you build a house of cards, then add in cards from a new deck, it has a tendency to fall.
 

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Now something else I want people to consider.
OUR media LOVES to hyperbole stuff like this.

READ the times of india and go through the articles.

Assuming that they are telling the truth, (they do have a bad habit of putting out their own narrative) that what was no longer is, or that it isn't as serious as they say.

But again. take it with a grain of salt.

 

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We've been told since day one that "natural immunity" and "herd immunity" didn't exist due to the fast mutations.

Why don't they make up their minds?
You ought to follow better sources. CDC, while saying they have no idea how long the immunity lasts ( from infection or vaccine) has recommended people neither get tested or quarantine upon exposure for 3 months after contracting COVID, unless they develop COVID systems not otherwise attributable.

Plenty of experts have offered guesses on heard immunity- the typical numbers being arround 70%. CDC has mentioned the 95% number for measles, and 80% for polio. I don’t think you will get an official answer from CDC until long after it happens, and dozens of studies are completed.

And of course it won’t exist without higher rates of vaccination. We’re at 25-30% in Alabama. Another 10% perhaps due to infection acquired immunity.
 

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Not new but like I suspect what is going to happen everywhere is people get vaxxed and then spread the V, they are called "super spreaders" as its not actually a vaxx and doesn't prevent anyone from actually getting C-19. So people get vaxxed think they are good to go and wind-up spreading it, this is a YUGE failure on the part of the MSM and politicians who have told nothing but lies about the so-called vaxx
So what's your solution? Just who is it spreading to?
 

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BTW, it wasn't "fast" it was slow,and that is far more concerning that a fast mutating virus.
And I can find 8 stories that agree with you, and 18 that don’t.


You ought to follow better sources. CDC, while saying they have no idea how long the immunity lasts ( from infection or vaccine) has recommended people neither get tested or quarantine upon exposure for 3 months after contracting COVID, unless they develop COVID systems not otherwise attributable.

Plenty of experts have offered guesses on heard immunity- the typical numbers being arround 70%. CDC has mentioned the 95% number for measles, and 80% for polio. I don’t think you will get an official answer from CDC until long after it happens, and dozens of studies are completed.

And of course it won’t exist without higher rates of vaccination. We’re at 25-30% in Alabama. Another 10% perhaps due to infection acquired immunity.
The CDC has changed their stories so many times in the last 14 months, I’d say they are no longer credible. Just bureaucrats chasing budget dollars.
 

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And I can find 8 stories that agree with you, and 18 that don’t.




The CDC has changed their stories so many times in the last 14 months, I’d say they are no longer credible. Just bureaucrats chasing budget dollars.
They have an agenda. Private company, owners of many patents, gave a multi-million dollar grant to Wuhan lab. Sleazy, underhanded, and Fauci is a caricature masquerading as a concerned medical professional.
 

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I think Biden should have restricted flights weeks ago. This Indian variant could be really bad.
You don't mean how Trump restricted flights out of China and got pilloried for it?

And it could be that Indians have poor hygiene, live on top of one another and aren't afflicted with all the rest of the world's worst bugs as well.

"The general lack of cleanliness and hygiene hits the eye wherever one goes in India — hotels, hospitals, households, work places, railway trains, airplanes and, yes, temples. Indians think nothing of spitting whenever they like and wherever they choose, and living in surroundings which they themselves make unliveable by their dirty habits.
The Indian Public Health Association has regularly been reporting the “scary situation” in Indian hotels, restaurants and eateries. The last, in particular, do not follow hygienic practices, use unclean containers, utensils and cups and plates and are often located near open drains or garbage bins." Most mid-day meal kitchens in schools are no better.


But I'm sure that has nothing to do about how fast covid proliferates there.

The CDC has changed their stories so many times in the last 14 months, I’d say they are no longer credible. Just bureaucrats chasing budget dollars.
I stopped listening to them months ago along with their cases, cases, cases curves.
 

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India Dispatch
‘This Is a Catastrophe.’ In India, Illness Is Everywhere.
363681


As India suffers the world’s worst coronavirus crisis, our New Delhi bureau chief describes the fear of living amid a disease spreading at such scale and speed.

By Jeffrey Gettleman
Photographs by Atul Loke
Published April 27, 2021Updated April 28, 2021


NEW DELHI — Crematories are so full of bodies, it’s as if a war just happened. Fires burn around the clock. Many places are holding mass cremations, dozens at a time, and at night, in certain areas of New Delhi, the sky glows.

Sickness and death are everywhere.

Dozens of houses in my neighborhood have sick people.

One of my colleagues is sick.

One of my son’s teachers is sick.

The neighbor two doors down, to the right of us: sick.

Two doors to the left: sick.

“I have no idea how I got it,” said a good friend who is now in the hospital. “You catch just a whiff of this…..” and then his voice
He barely got a bed. And the medicine his doctors say he needs is nowhere to be found in India.
I’m sitting in my apartment waiting to catch the disease. That’s what it feels like right now in New Delhi with the world’s worst coronavirus crisis advancing around us. It is out there, I am in here, and I feel like it’s only a matter of time before I, too, get sick.

India is now recording more infections per day — as many as 350,000 — than any other country has since the pandemic began, and that’s just the official number, which most experts think is a vast underestimation.

New Delhi, India’s sprawling capital of 20 million, is suffering a calamitous surge. A few days ago, the positivity rate hit a staggering 36 percent — meaning more than one out of three people tested were infected. A month ago, it was less than 3 percent.

The infections have spread so fast that hospitals have been completely swamped. People are turned away by the thousands. Medicine is running out. So is lifesaving oxygen. The sick have been left stranded in interminable lines at hospital gates or at home, literally gasping for air.

Although New Delhi is locked down, the disease is still rampaging. Doctors across this city and some of Delhi’s top politicians are issuing desperate SOS calls to India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, on social media and on TV, begging for oxygen, medicine, help.

Experts had always warned that Covid-19 could wreak real havoc in India. This country is enormous — 1.4 billion people. And densely populated. And in many places, very poor.

What we’re witnessing is so different from last year, during India’s first wave. Then, it was the fear of the unknown. Now we know. We know the totality of the disease, the scale, the speed. We know the terrifying force of this second wave, hitting everyone at the same time.

What we had been fearing during last year’s first wave, and which never really materialized, is now happening in front of our eyes: a breakdown, a collapse, a realization that so many people will die.

As a foreign correspondent for nearly 20 years, I’ve covered combat zones, been kidnapped in Iraq and been thrown in jail in more than a few places.

This is unsettling in a different way. There’s no way of knowing if my two kids, wife or I will be among those who get a mild case and then bounce back to good health, or if we will get really sick. And if we do get really sick, where will we go? ICUs are full. Gates to many hospitals have been closed.

A new variant known here as “the double mutant” may be doing a lot of the damage. The science is still early but from what we know, this variant contains one mutation that may make the virus more contagious and another that may make it partially resistant to vaccines. Doctors are pretty scared. Some we have spoken to said they had been vaccinated twice and still got seriously ill, a very bad sign.

So what can you do?

I try to stay positive, believing that is one of the best immunity boosters, but I find myself drifting in a daze through the rooms of our apartment, listlessly opening cans of food and making meals for my kids, feeling like my mind and body are turning to mush. I’m afraid to check my phone and get another message about a friend who has deteriorated. Or worse. I’m sure millions of people have felt this way, but I’ve started imagining symptoms: Is my throat sore? What about that background headache? Is it worse today?

My part of town, South Delhi, is now hushed. Like many other places, we had a strict lockdown last year. But now doctors here are warning us that the virus is more contagious, and the chances of getting help are so much worse than they were during the first wave. So many of us are scared to step outside, like there’s some toxic gas we’re all afraid to breathe.

India is a story of scale, and it cuts both ways. It has a lot of people, a lot of needs and a lot of suffering. But it also has lot of technology, industrial capacity and resources, both human and material. I almost teared up the other night when the news showed an Indian Air Force jet load up with oxygen tanks from Singapore to bring to needy parts of the country. The government was essentially airlifting air.

However difficult and dangerous it feels in Delhi for all of us, it’s probably going to get worse. Epidemiologists say the numbers will keep climbing, to 500,000 reported cases a day nationwide and as many as one million Indians dead from Covid-19 by August.

It didn’t have to be like this.

India was doing well up until a few weeks ago, at least on the surface. It locked down, absorbed the first wave, then opened up. It maintained a low death rate (at least by official statistics). By winter, life in many respects had returned to something near normal.

I was out reporting in January and February, driving through towns in central India. No one — and I mean no one, including police officers — was wearing a mask. It was like the country had said to itself, while the second wave was looming: Don’t worry, we got this.

Few people feel that way now.

Mr. Modi remains popular among his base but more people are blaming him for failing to prepare India for this surge and for holding packed political rallies in recent weeks where few precautions were enforced — possible super-spreader events.

“Social distancing norms have gone for a complete toss,” said one Delhi newscaster the other day, during a broadcast of one of Mr. Modi’s rallies.

Indians are also upset with the sluggish pace of the vaccination campaign. Fewer than 10 percent of the population have received one dose, and only 1.6 percent are fully vaccinated, despite two vaccines being produced here.

In India, as elsewhere, the wealthy can pad the blow of many crises. But this time it’s different.

A well-connected friend activated his entire network to help someone close to him, a young man with a bad case of Covid. My friend’s friend died. No amount of pull could get him into a hospital. There were just too many other sick people.

“I tried everything in my power to get this guy a bed, and we couldn’t,” my friend said. “It’s chaos.”
His feelings were raw.

“This is a catastrophe. This is murder.”

I take few risks except to get food for my family that can’t be delivered. I wear two masks and cut wide berths around as many people as I can.

But most days pass with the four of us marooned inside. We try to play games, we try not to talk about who just got sick or who’s racing around this besieged city looking for help they probably won’t find.

Sometimes we just sit quietly in the living room, looking out at the ficus and palm trees.

Through the open window, on long, still, hot afternoons, we can hear two things: Ambulances. And birdsong.

nytimes.com/2021/04/27/world/asia/India-delhi-covid-cases.html
 

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F that I am getting the jab, already got the first one. No big deal. When I enlisted (Army) i had to get shots, its no big deal.

the situation in India is serious, people who got the initial strain of covid are now getting infected with the new one. Young people are getting seriously sick where last time it was mild. Something changed and I suspect it is China playing games.
 

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F that I am getting the jab, already got the first one. No big deal. When I enlisted (Army) i had to get shots, its no big deal.

the situation in India is serious, people who got the initial strain of covid are now getting infected with the new one. Young people are getting seriously sick where last time it was mild. Something changed and I suspect it is China playing games.
Ah,a member of the test group. As a member of the control group, I salute your sacrifice.
 

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Burning up to 30,000 bodies a day in parks and streets..the curve shows the Ivermectin treatment started dropping the case curve but after the shots the curve climbed rapidly..getting bad and they did the shots 6 weeks before us..so,4 weeks and change before we see if their cause is gonna be our cause..
No need to overthink it.

They had a religious gathering called Kumbh Mela festival that lasted 30 days, 3.2 MILLION people attended total. It wasn't even over before the cases started climbing fast.



The organizers were warned beforehand that this might turn into a super spreader event but the Indian Ministry of Health dismissed it as fake news.

That went well.
 

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India Dispatch
‘This Is a Catastrophe.’ In India, Illness Is Everywhere.


NEW DELHI — Crematories are so full of bodies, it’s as if a war just happened. Fires burn around the clock. Many places are holding mass cremations, dozens at a time, and at night, in certain areas of New Delhi, the sky glows.

Sickness and death are everywhere.
Frankly...that just sounds like a Thursday in India.
Ever been there? The people that I know who DID go there, will never go again.
 

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Frankly...that just sounds like a Thursday in India.
That's unfair. India is India, it isn't western Europe. It is unique in the world. Painting the entire subcontinent as some disease-ridden cesspool is disingenuous at best. Middle class people in India live the same as you and I - and they have a rapidly growing middle class.

Ever been there?
I lived in a city (Delhi) and also in a rural community. Ate the food, drank the water, used the squat toilets. Traveled all over the subcontinent. Went swimming in the Arabian Sea. How about you?

The people that I know who DID go there, will never go again.
I loved it so much I nearly didn't come back. The people, food, clothing, food, movies, climate and food delighted me. I'd happily live there again.
 

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The infections have spread so fast that hospitals have been completely swamped. People are turned away by the thousands. Medicine is running out. So is lifesaving oxygen. The sick have been left stranded in interminable lines at hospital gates or at home, literally gasping for air.

Although New Delhi is locked down, the disease is still rampaging. Doctors across this city and some of Delhi’s top politicians are issuing desperate SOS calls to India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, on social media and on TV, begging for oxygen, medicine, help.

Experts had always warned that Covid-19 could wreak real havoc in India. This country is enormous — 1.4 billion people. And densely populated. And in many places, very poor.

What we’re witnessing is so different from last year, during India’s first wave. Then, it was the fear of the unknown. Now we know. We know the totality of the disease, the scale, the speed. We know the terrifying force of this second wave, hitting everyone at the same time.

What we had been fearing during last year’s first wave, and which never really materialized, is now happening in front of our eyes: a breakdown, a collapse, a realization that so many people will die.
Working from the supposition that everything you are reading is an actual and factual account. (to whit I am not trying to doubt, but setting the stage to my point.)

When the virus first appeared, India like every other nation went into a 'lockdown". the pictures from 2020 of all the people wearing masks. The photographs from New Delhi showing the Himalayas in the background for the first time in decades because the pollution settled. The totality of the restrictions in many instances far more restrictive there than in the US. The aspect that is presented here violates all that we know about viruses in general and this one specifically.

Consider this: India has many multiple conditions including unhygienic situations that should have fostered the spread LAST YEAR, yet did not? Based on the aspects presented now, this should have happened in May of 2020, NOT 2021.

Why now?

As pointed out. "...last year’s first wave, and which never really materialized" That singular point is the problem I am having.
The rest of the world had a massive spread, has in many instances FAR superior hygiene, FAR superior sewage treatment, FAR superior medical facilities FOR THE POOR,

The article makes the case of the "...the scale, the speed..."

Again, diseases DO NOT BEHAVE in the manner that has been presented here.
India who's conditions were NO DIFFERENT last year than today, now suddenly is savaged by this?

Something about this narrative is not jiving folks.
 
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