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So I am looking at the whole gas prices versus mileage thing and come across this on the internet.

100% Acetone added to normal gas will increase the mileage of your car.

Say what? Anyone ever heard of this? Thoughts?
 

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You put acetone in your gas and over a relatively short period of time it will eat not only the rubber but many plastics including ABS that is used through out your fuel system.
And like already said it it expensive to boot.
 

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Getting Older
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Acetone probably will increase your gas mileage until it burns your valves or destroys the emissions system on the car cutting the mileage efficiency in half.

I would be weary of putting any amount of acetone in any OBII car (1996 or later).
 

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I worked in a Petroleum lab for over 8 years.
We used Acetone to clean out glassware & measuring equipment.
I ran the Research Octane Engine for several years & blended gas for Philips 66 top fuel dragster. I do not know then or now about adding acetone to fuel.
I can tell you acetone will eat up most plastics & greatly weaken a lot of polymere chains. I never even attempted to mix it in gasoline. It is an organic solvent so it will definitely clean all the crap out of the bottom of the carburetor, but I also think it will destroy all the rubber & plastic parts. As for increasing the octane, a solvent is more likely to reduce & separate components breaking down hydrocarbon chains screwing with the octane.
I would not try this on my car engine.:thumb:
 

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Acetone probably will increase your gas mileage until it burns your valves or destroys the emissions system on the car cutting the mileage efficiency in half.

I would be weary of putting any amount of acetone in any OBII car (1996 or later).
I did a lot of research on this about a year ago. Some place did a study on the effects of accetone on rubber o-rings and seals and it came up negative on destruction over 4 years of testing. I run acetone "that I get free from work" in my 1984 chevy silverado and in my jeep cherokee. I will say It does give you a "Slight increase in milage" about 1.5-2.5 MPG more. I have yet for it to cause any problems. I add about 3/4 of a cup to both tanks on fill up.
 

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fallschirmjäger
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I wouldn't experiment on my car!

I try to squeeze as much gas mileage as I can, but there is a thin line, that I do not cross. By adding some "enhancing" chemicals, we can really messed up environment (and our car) and finally the cost of one gallon of a gasoline will double (because sooner or later we will have to clean our mess).

here are my gas saving tips:
1) use only a best quality gas (check "tier 1 gasoline" on google). Here in Canada I use only Petro Canada or Shell. Husky/Mohawk is good too.
2) use cruise control, which is great especially on prairies :)
3) maintain your car regularly, not only when some warning light is on (change oil filter, etc.)
4) drive around 55 mph which is very economic speed
5) don't speed up rapidly
6) keep optimal pressure in tires

I drive cobalt 2008 with manual transmission and sometimes I can get about 42 (and more) miles per gallon, but usually it varies around 40-41 miles per gallon.

I have more tips, but don't want to change main topic of this post :cool:
 

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Always watching from afar
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There was a test done on this on J-body.org, what we concluded was there was no positive effects unless you like paying for fuel pumps and fuel injectors. There was no increase in MPG.
 

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Acetone does have one MAJOR benefit that few realize... When you run it through your intake manifold it will decarbon your head and valves. Back in the seventies when there was the original gas shortage and water vapor injection was developed, acetone was added to the "witches brew" to assist in this. Bear in mind that the car engines in those days were designed for octane levels of around 90 to 91 and timing had to be retarded to prevent engine damage when running lower octane levels, Well carboned up engines were prone to predetonation and quite often this would end up blowing the engine when running the more volitile lower octane fuels. Water injection would allow the lower grade fuel to be run at normal timing points and allow the engine to develop the normal horsepower and torque that it was designed for. These engines had compression levels between ten and eleven to one. Todays engines are around nine to one, allowing for lower octane fuel, and the socalled flexi fuel vehicles have even lower octane requirements and compression. Kits are available that automatically adjust fuel ratios and timing for older vehicles, thereby converting them to Flexi fuel standards. By the way, the myth that E85 fuel will destroy your fuel system is blatantly false, Alcohol is lower in corosive and solvent properties than gasoline. However, your vehicle does need to be able to properly meter E85 and adjust timing accordingly, hence the electronics kits to make the conversion for non flexi fuel vehicles.
 

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DIY RPG's
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i've used acetone to clean valve covers and other engine parts before. when rebuilding an engine. however i would never ever ever ever let it touch any non metal part cause then you have to buy a new part. if you wanna see how bad acetone is for your car go to an auto parts store buy 2 fuel injector O-rings. that will set you back maybe 50 cents.
now put an o_ring in a glass of gas and another in a glass of acetone within one 24 hour period you wont be able to see the one in acetone. why ant because its invisible but because it has dissloved. so please don't do this to your car
 

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Run alcohol :) 50% (or more, I run 98%) mix should work just fine Wink Wink. Most vehicles on the planet are ALREADY setup for alcohol (as far as fuel system components not motor tuning) the reason is that most fuels at the pump will contain 10% alcohol, check at the pump or with the station. If 10% alcohol does not eat the O rings, neither will 100% because they designed the fuel system to handle the alcohol they started adding in the 70's.

To tune the motor open the injector pulse width (fuel injected motors) a few milliseconds from off idle to WOT (wide open), for carb equipped cars, one maybe two jet sizes bigger. If it runs good but knocks or pings adjust spark plug heat ratings one rating at a time, sometimes spark gap affects alcohol as well.

I promote alcohol for self sufficiency, look into it eventually acetone will look like a joke :) (which it is BTW) S/H YMMV, but mines cheap and effective ......
 

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I worked in a plastics factory a few years back. We used acetone to clean parts that were used to spray paint plastic mirrors. If applied to acrylic, acetone causes immediate crazing and breakdown of the plastic. One day a guy in the office decided to use some acetone to clean his HP printer because he had gotten some ink on it. Needless to say on that type of plastic, it started melting the plastic almost immediately. It was quite a mess.

So no, I would not recommend it in any fuel system.
 

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Whenever you here these Magical fuel saving tips do you really belive them? All the car companys spend hundreds of millions of dollars on engine deveolpment and updates. Do you really think there is some cure that will all help us get some insane mileage increase? I don't think so. And I doubt some regular joe or scientist would come up with it himself when car companies hire teams of the best engineer's on the planet.
 

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95% of technology has been developed by the average joe. Second only to weather people, engineering is more guessing or opinion than science. The greatest names in science or technology weren't great till they made their discoveries. Perfect example is Albert Einstein, didn't do bad for a lowly patent clerk.......

If you close your mind and expect someone else to do it, what happens when that person expects you to do it? I can tell you that true thinkers are the little guy, I have seen it hundreds of times, even know a few. "If you dream it build it, before someone else does". I have a few ideas I thought were stupid, only to see another automotive engineer capitalize on my mistake of not reacting to my original idea.
 

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I worked in a Petroleum lab for over 8 years.
We used Acetone to clean out glassware & measuring equipment.
I ran the Research Octane Engine for several years & blended gas for Philips 66 top fuel dragster. I do not know then or now about adding acetone to fuel.
I can tell you acetone will eat up most plastics & greatly weaken a lot of polymere chains. I never even attempted to mix it in gasoline. It is an organic solvent so it will definitely clean all the crap out of the bottom of the carburetor, but I also think it will destroy all the rubber & plastic parts. As for increasing the octane, a solvent is more likely to reduce & separate components breaking down hydrocarbon chains screwing with the octane.
I would not try this on my car engine.:thumb:
You peaked my curiosity, can I get a complete breakdown of the fuel for the dragster? As far as I know (and I could be wrong) crew chiefs adjust and mix their own fuels based on conditions at the track. Seems that someone in the lab wouldn't help much, unless the lab is trackside. The content of these fuels are super easy and to give the hint, NONE contain any gasoline, so these systems are designed and built for different fuels than even acetone. I know the answers to my questions, but the real question is why don't you know about adding acetone to a top fuel dragster? If you did add acetone to "dragster fuel" it wont blend anyway, one is water soluble, the other is a petrol chemical solvent. HMMMMM? Let me know
 

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But look at all the automotive innovation in the last 50 years. We only increase by small percentages year by year. Sure the little guy can come up with an innovation that helps. Engineering might be guessing but it cost's alot when your breaking custom milled parts on an hourly basis to perform test's when the little guy simply can't afford that.
 

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I race cars, I build engines, I engineer parts, I machine my own parts. I rent a Water Jet (from a lawnmower company LOL) I have done 99% of my own trial and error. It only costs "major" when you make a mistake, the key is to be sure before you start, otherwise you have an idea with someone else's money on the line. Don't start unless you can finish.

When I was in college a few friends and I decided we "knew better" than the major players, we took the try, payed for a patent and found out that the product we had was out already. The worst part was the company that produced the part had the niche filled, we were done. It was a design nearly identical, but ours cost about 500 dollars to design and implement, the same company that won the idea, has lost money on the product since they patented it. WHY? Simple, they spent 4 million dollars and three years of testing on R&D. It happens to be a small market idea, that they spent big money trying to promote and develop. To me I still say we won, we aren't stuck with the loss.

I guarantee that at least ten things you use everyday, were created by "nobodies" in the mix trying to make a few bucks.
 

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Acetone is part of the composition of Chemtool B-12 fuel system treatment it is 30% acetone and 60-70 % percent Toulene and may include Methanol and/or Hexanes information is from MSDS. Point is that in diluted amounts it will clean your fuel system of carbon deposits and that is where your MPG increase will come from. I tried using Acetone and it worked for awhile but I had much better results with SEAFOAM motor treatment....if you buy some read the instructions on how to use it to clean carbon deposits it worked great for me. The check engine light was on due to clogged EGR valve and that stuff cleaned it up after several, diluted as recommended, tank fulls and after performing the engine carbon clean up instructions printed on can. O'reilly auto parts and other Auto parts sell SEAFOAM motor treatment.
 
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