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The purpose of this article is not to disprove the safety of immunizations. The sole purpose of this article is to provide the reader with information on Immunizations and resistance to diseases.

It is the belief of the author that immunizations are not 100% effective. The information presented herein is for the reader to make up their own mind. The authors bias might play a factor in the information being presented. So the reader should do their own research.


Let us begin:

Measles


http://science.education.nih.gov/supplements/nih1/diseases/activities/activity5_measles-database.htm

In 1997, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported a total of 138 cases of measles in the United States. Most of these outbreaks probably began when an infected person from another country (specifically Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Brazil, and Japan) entered the United States. The virus subsequently spread through the population, with the longest chain of transmission lasting five weeks. Children were most affected by these outbreaks: 29 percent of cases were children 1-4 years old; 28 percent were children 5-19; 26 percent were adults 20-39. In addition, unvaccinated people accounted for 77 percent of cases; people who received only one dose of vaccine accounted for 18 percent of cases; and people who received the full two doses of vaccine accounted for 5 percent of cases. (These statistics demonstrate that a small percentage of people fail to develop immunity after one or even two doses of vaccine.)

Even though unvaccinated people accounted for 77 percent of cases, one dose of vaccine accounted for 18 percent of cases; full two doses of vaccine accounted for 5 percent of cases.

Between the people that received 1 and 2 doses, that group of people accounted for 23% of the total number of Measles cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control.


Chicken Pox (varicella)

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/416372_4

The US Food and Drug Administration licensed the varicella vaccine (Varivax) in March 1995 for use in persons 12 months of age or older. The ACIP, AAP, and AAFP have recommended routine immunization of children and adolescents. Nationally, in children aged 19 to 35 months, the varicella vaccination rate increased from 25% in 1997 to 67% in 2000.[104]

In contrast to the nearly 100% protection conferred in those with natural infection, immunity from the vaccine is incomplete. About 70% to 85% of recipients develop protective efficacy.[105,106] Fifteen to thirty percent develop varicella when exposed to wild virus, albeit a mild form with less than 35 lesions. A case-control study conducted in New Haven, Connecticut, found the vaccine to be effective, with a measured efficacy rate of 85% (95% CI, 78% to 90%).[105] Against moderately severe or severe disease, the vaccine was 97% effective (95% CI, 93% to 99%).
Fifteen to thirty percent of the children that received the Chicken Pox vaccine still contracted the disease when exposed to it in the wild.


From the same link as above:
One study reported a surprisingly high rate of breakthrough varicella among vaccinated children.[107] In this study of 593 healthy Japanese children, the cumulative incidence 7 to 9 years after vaccination was reportedly 159/459, or 34.2%. The study suffered from some limitations. An unreported number of children was vaccinated prior to 12 months of age, when placentally transmitted maternal antibody may block the vaccine. Furthermore, of the 593, only 459, or 77.4%, responded. The breakthrough varicella rate may have been as low as 147/593, or 26.5%. In any event, the overwhelming majority of children suffered only mild disease. One third experienced fever, which lasted only 1 to 2 days in 80%. Sixty percent had fewer than 30 vesicles and papules, and about 12% had about 100 vesicles or papules.
The disturbing number is 12%. This number had an outbreak of about 100 vesicles or papules. Does this mean that >12% developed almost 0% resistance to Chicken Pox?


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17360990
Children between the ages of 8 and 12 years who had been vaccinated at least 5 years previously were significantly more likely to have moderate or severe disease than were those who had been vaccinated less than 5 years previously (risk ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 5.8). The annual rate of breakthrough varicella significantly increased with the time since vaccination, from 1.6 cases per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 1.2 to 2.0) within 1 year after vaccination to 9.0 per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 6.9 to 11.7) at 5 years and 58.2 per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 36.0 to 94.0) at 9 years. CONCLUSIONS: A second dose of varicella vaccine, now recommended for all children, could improve protection from both primary vaccine failure and waning vaccine-induced immunity. Copyright 2007 Massachusetts Medical Society.
The above article points to @12% as the upper limit (6.9 to 11.7). While the second article suggest an average of @12%. The longer the person goes without a booster, the less protection a person has. After 20 years of receiving the immunization shot, the level of resistance is almost non-existent. However, if a person catches the chicken pox virus, and it is allowed to run its course, the person will have some type of limited lifetime protection.


Conclusion
Regardless of what the doctors or government tells you, immunizations are not 100% effective.
 

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Thanks Kev,

I always figured that it would make more sense for my kids to get the chicken pox than to get the short. But what the hell do I know? Im not a Dr. and they know everything. 2 of my kids have had chicken pox, the other 2 have not because now noone gets it thanks to the vaccine. Now, I am faced with the dilemma, get them the vaccine and then they will be open to this virus later as adults(when it wears off) or dont get them the vaccine and they will be open to this virus later as adults. When we know it is a real problem to contract chicken pox as an adult. Nice options. It might be better if it was kept as a childhood illness because kids have a better chance of surviving chicken pox than adults do.
 

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Thanks Kev,

I always figured that it would make more sense for my kids to get the chicken pox than to get the short. But what the hell do I know? Im not a Dr. and they know everything. 2 of my kids have had chicken pox, the other 2 have not because now noone gets it thanks to the vaccine. Now, I am faced with the dilemma, get them the vaccine and then they will be open to this virus later as adults(when it wears off) or dont get them the vaccine and they will be open to this virus later as adults. When we know it is a real problem to contract chicken pox as an adult. Nice options. It might be better if it was kept as a childhood illness because kids have a better chance of surviving chicken pox than adults do.

I am a physician, and do feel as if most immunizations are effective....but bear in mind that there will always be variants to naturally occuring disease. The severity of chickenpox after the shot is usually less severe. As far as it being better for children to get the chickenpox, this in not really true...young children have immature immune systems, and disseminated disease which speads into the brain can cause a fatal viral meningitis....medicine is as much an art as it is a science....we always have to weigh the risks and benefits to all that we do...even taking tylenol carries risk, yet most people pop it like it is candy. I do recommend havingbcandid discussions with your doctor, and getting reliable info....not all docs are elitist snobs, and I am always happy to help people make informed choices
 

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it's the opine of this author that vaccinations are not only ineffective, but harmful both physically and economically.

physically 'cause they're usually not needed, and sometimes increased the incidences of the diseases they were vaccinating against. economically 'cause they're usually not needed, and money is better spent on other medical endeavors.

could do a long rant, but here's some pics from a video i saw years ago that sums it up case and point:











there are more, but these all illustrate that by the time the vaccines were introduced wide-scale the diseases were already on the sharp decline and in some cases effectively wiped out.

aside from not being effective, there is anecdotal evidence supporting that the vaccines actually caused health complications in later life:



yep.
oh yeah. i'm biased as well. also not a doctor. this is not advice. please don't sue.

images courtesy vaclib.org
 
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