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Generator Wrangler
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Discussion Starter #1
If you were interested in looking at a house for rent and the property manager asked for the following information before making an appointment, what would you do?

1) Full name and date of birth
2) Your place of employment
3) Length of employment
4) Yearly income
5) Have you ever been convicted of a felony?
6) Any past evictions?
7) Ever been taken to court for a unpaid debt?
 

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junior counsel member
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As a landlord, I tell them they need 3 times the rent in income. I tell them they will pay for a background check and that I do not care what their credit score is. I tell them if they don't pay the rent, I will see them in court.

It has worked very well since July of 2017.

The most functional part is telling them about the background check.
 

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None of those questions are unreasonable to be asked by a landlord or manager when interviewing possible tenants. Those questions weed out 90% of the bad tenants.

So I would answer them if you actually expect to rent from them. I would be shocked if you could rent a place without answering questions like those.

Lots of losers will blanket apply to all open rentals hoping to get a suckered to rent to them. People that don't make enough, felons, people that have multiple evictions, or other major red flags. This saves everyone time.

You would not believe the number of people that apply to my rentals where they collect 700 in disability and the rent is 800 a month but they still think they can afford it.
 

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Generator Wrangler
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Discussion Starter #5
As a landlord, I tell them they need 3 times the rent in income. I tell them they will pay for a background check and that I do not care what their credit score is. I tell them if they don't pay the rent, I will see them in court.

It has worked very well since July of 2017.

The most functional part is telling them about the background check.
Do you rent to felons?
 
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I agree it's a way to weed out bad renters however its not all in one, as I know a few people who are felons and that is their past, and they are better people now, also I myself have been in collections have been sued I got behind when my husband had cancer and we lost everything including a business and house, but by the grace of god we have overcame that and have paid off all bills and rebuilt credit we are hopefully fixing to become home owners again very soon.
 

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Generator Wrangler
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Discussion Starter #9
OK so here is the deal. I'm the landlord, those are my pre qualifying questions to view my properties. I posted this to see if anyone thought I was being unreasonable. I've lost count of the number of potential tenants who just stop communicating as soon as I ask for that information. Thanks for your input.
 

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I get chatty with them about the quality of the schools and things to do with children to find out if they are a family. It’s wrong. I know it’s wrong but turning over a rental after singles have been in it for a year is to expensive and families tend to stay for many years.
 

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OK so here is the deal. I'm the landlord, those are my pre qualifying questions to view my properties. I posted this to see if anyone thought I was being unreasonable. I've lost count of the number of potential tenants who just stop communicating as soon as I ask for that information. Thanks for your input.
Here are some questions to consider asking.

How many people will be living here. (Had a family of 7 try to rent a 1 bedroom house)

What pets do you have if you allow them. (I once had some one try to rent a small house with a pet pig that weight 100lbs)

Also I wont say no to renting to someone is a felon. Depends on the felony and how long ago. I almost rented to a guy that had a felon 20 plus years ago for assault or something similar. Was fine with it and liked him but ran a background check and every couple years since then he got into a fight at a bar. I understand bad things happen to people and people can change from when they are younger but there was a repeat pattern. Really if something happens 10 years ago and nothing since I will consider it a mistake and they learned from it.


It is better to have you unit empty than to rent to a crappy person. If they wont answer your questions you probably would regret renting to them.
 

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Generator Wrangler
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Discussion Starter #12
Here are some questions to consider asking.

How many people will be living here. (Had a family of 7 try to rent a 1 bedroom house)

What pets do you have if you allow them. (I once had some one try to rent a small house with a pet pig that weight 100lbs)

Also I wont say no to renting to someone is a felon. Depends on the felony and how long ago. I almost rented to a guy that had a felon 20 plus years ago for assault or something similar. Was fine with it and liked him but ran a background check and every couple years since then he got into a fight at a bar. I understand bad things happen to people and people can change from when they are younger but there was a repeat pattern. Really if something happens 10 years ago and nothing since I will consider it a mistake and they learned from it.


It is better to have you unit empty than to rent to a crappy person. If they wont answer your questions you probably would regret renting to them.
Fortunately in my state there is a limit to the number of tenants that a landlord must rent to based on the number of bedrooms.

Ever ran in to the situation of an "emotional support" animal? Apparently pitbulls are very supportive of humans. I swear that the pitbull breed would go extinct if not for people who rent houses.
 

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Fortunately in my state there is a limit to the number of tenants that a landlord must rent to based on the number of bedrooms.

Ever ran in to the situation of an "emotional support" animal? Apparently pitbulls are very supportive of humans. I swear that the pitbull breed would go extinct if not for people who rent houses.
We have a similar rule but did not stop the parents from trying to shove their 2 teenage boys in an unfinished breezeway. Luckily I said no before they rented.

Emotional support animals are the curse of landlords. 2 thoughts call your insurance and ask do they have any dogs that they will not cover for insurance. This gives you an out to blame someone else on to say no. 2nd I allow 2 pets in my rentals. The pet fees are already built into the rent price. If they have more than 2 animals it needs approval and an extra 25 dollars per pet a month. I find most support animals are fake just to be able rent a place. I don't care if they are support animals or not if there are 3 animals in my unit I will collect my rent plus 25 dollars even if 1 is a support animal. Funny how I never once had a person claim they have a support animal with this policy.

Also I get tons of applicants due to allowing pets compare to units that dont allow pets. Good tenants usually have good pets. Bad tenants have bad pets.
 

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Possum Lover
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My neighbor rented. Every single tenant had an uncontrollable dog that barked all night, tore up the fence, etc. One time I found 2 boys tearing a hole in the fence "because we lost our ball". You can bet I marched over there and talked to the mother - she told me they HAD NOT and I made her come look at them doing it, then she went off about "get away from those boards" apparently did not know the name for "fence".

Families were the worst for noise, property damage, trespassing in MY yard, etc. She had a no pets policy but they ALL had dogs, some more than one. Since she never visited I had to tell her. Then once they are in, by Texas law it is apparently very hard to evict a section 8 tenant.

She NEVER checked on the property, and she does not live far away. IMO if you are going to rent you need to do an inspection every month AT LEAST. And NO section 8 they are on welfare for a reason = loser who will not respect your property.

After the last one, hoarder, had to gut the house, she rented to her daughter who has been OK, mostly. They are quiet, no dog, and stay out of my yard.

Don't say you are refusing to rent because of a support animal. Say there were some issues with the credit check. Otherwise you might be forced to accept them and the mutt as a tenant.

Everyone is using the ESA excuse to take pit bulls everywhere. My Walmart had to ban them because people were bringing pit bulls into the store running wild and barking.
 

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If the state or city require a permit of inspection for rentals ask to see his and follow up with the city or state to see that it has been done and conforms to their inspection. Also ask to see the report.
 

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Generator Wrangler
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Discussion Starter #18
If the state or city require a permit of inspection for rentals ask to see his and follow up with the city or state to see that it has been done and conforms to their inspection. Also ask to see the report.
First, I don't think it's that common for states or cities to require that a rental be inspected. It's not here anyway. I know that there must be an inspection prior to renting to a dwelling under section 8, but in that situation the potential tenant already has prior knowledge of the inspection. It's actually part of the move-in procedure.

Second, in the case of an inspection actually being required, the vast majority of landlords are on the up and up and would be happy to share the inspection report. My experience is that the image of a landlord as a scheming, duplicitous slumlord is a gross, inaccurate stereotype (notwithstanding the odd anecdotal story we've all heard). On the other hand, screening out liars, cons, and deadbeats when trying to rent out a property seems par for the course.
 
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once they are in, by Texas law it is apparently very hard to evict a section 8 tenant.
a guy who had started and failed at a dozen businesses bought the trailer park I lived in. first, he evicted all the people who owed more than 6 months rent. very easy in CA 30 years ago. then he started in on the troublemakers. he evicted so many Section 8 losers that the Section 8 office asked him to evict people for them. he ended up starting an eviction service.

6 months after he evicted a guy for me I saw him and his wife enter a restaurant. I went over to greet him, and said "Heartless Harry Hooper, the leading cause of homelessness in Buttburg, California". after they stopped laughing Harry said he would put that on his next batch of business cards. and he did.
 

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Preparing
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True story: best & quietest rental neighbors I ever had were 3 whores renting the unit upstairs from me in a 16 unit building.

Initially, I was peeved that the owners let them in, but they were super neighbors, I guess they didn't want any trouble. Even their customers were quiet. Occasional parties but no big deal.

Taught me to cast a wider net regarding neighbors. I was kinda sorry when they moved out.
 
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