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Discussion Starter #1
What are the best ways to protect a bug-out location from wildfires?

I'm in the beginning stage of picking a few acres for my BOL. (Any advice on that alone is appreciated.) So far, I'm looking for some rural land that's a few miles from a small town area. the goal is to make it a general retreat and a SHTF back-up spot. It will be within am easy tank of gas from my home, has natural access to water, and is low risk for natural disasters.

One main issue I keep thinking about is natural or manmade fires. Do you all have any suggestions on how to protect land from wild fires that may sweep the land around my bugout acreage? I've found a good area but it's prone to dry spells and the subsequent fires. I'd hate to lose my gardens, cabin and topsoil supplies to a wildfire.

Right now, I'm keep coming back to possibly digging a trench... but that's time, labor and $$ intensive. Plus, it may attract more attention than I'd like. I'll already be digging a 'root cellar' but want to protect the top soil preps, too, if possible.

Any prepper hack ideas for protecting the land from fire when there's no fire dept to call?
 

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We all like trees, but the best thing that you can do is to build a fire break around your structure. Unfortunately that means removind foliage and other burnable materieals to a distance of 100' around anything you don't want to burn. Depending upon where you live there may be federal programs available that do this for you; I know we have them out here in Southern Utah.

You might look here for further info:

http://www.calfire.ca.gov/fire_prevention/fire_prevention.php

As for protecting your property without a FD you need to get foam and an injector system to spray your burnables down with expanding foam. Water alone will not work so well, and there are home foam kits available for the consumer.

http://www.homefirefightingsystems.com/home.html
 

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My personal plan is a tank dedicated to fire protection and treated water /foam at the water pump on a trailer, for around the property .
My multi tool lawn tractor, can haul the trailer about any where necessary and naturally having significant hose to dispense the retardant, as well as carrying the regular fire fighting tools .
I also have plans to connect a spigot /ball valve at each sink and a hose connected like a fire hose in a hotel.
I have used water heater tanks I've repaired and on line, so if the city water is off, I can still pressurize and operate as usual .
 

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A moat without fire breathing dragons, or keep building materials to non combustibles as much as possible especially if there isn't a structure there yet. Metal roof, brick / block walls, etc. Anyone know if cacti get dry in the wild and catch fire?
 

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There are several issues with different solutions.
1. As mentioned, concrete walls, steel roof without wooden overhang. This against any actual fires, natural or manmade.
2. Firebreak is good but would not protect against poisonous gases, or a lack of oxygen. A real solution is involved and expensive, but a much greater clearance would help. I am talking about 100 yards at least.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the thoughts.

The dedicated water tank for fires and foam/gel stuff are ones I hadn't thought of.

I plan to clear a wide circle around the property and bury stuff in the root cellar. :)
 

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Fire break is the only real way to keep it safe (no trees and short or no grass). You can buy the commercial (expensive) foam or just use dish/laundry soap it's the same stuff!
 

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Land I own in another area that burned 3 years ago in the wildfires that swept much of Texas.

The good news is that the land recovered quickly. I was told the flames reached up to 75 ft. high and winds were between 20 and 40 mph, which blew burning debris across a four lane highway with climbing lane shoulders on each side, and caught land across the highway on fire.

In a real wildfire situation, there's not much you can do.
 

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Texan
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I'd say keep more than 100 ft between you and the tree line not only for fire. If your being attacked you have that much more time to prepare and repel them.

For fire I'd say build underground with concrete and metal.
 

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Fly it Northward
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Here's a very helpful link:

http://bcwildfire.ca/Prevention/firesmart.htm

There's a tool on there that lets you evaluate and score the risk from wildfire to your property. Good info.

I have a pump and sprinkler system at my place. Just as importantly though is that I have dropped trees close to the buildings and cleaned up any fine fuels within 100 feet of the buildings. That said...I have seen lots of structures saved from some rank 4-5 fires with some pretty basic sprinklers...amazed by how well they worked!
 

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1. Clean the area of brush
2. Clear any low standing limbs from your trees
3. Burn or dispose of all the brush and low standing limbs from your property
4. Have a decent size water tank for emergency use to put out fires (safety first!)
5. Firebreaks

There is a YouTube channel Im subscribed to he worked with the wildfires that happened not to long ago. Here's a playlist of some of his suggest to help defend your property from fires.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu9l40IymKw_RHni7GatkBp3nql2NzFJd

There's other videos not listed in that playlist I just picked one to help get you started...He's got really good info regarding land clearing to prevent from wildfires.

Good Luck
 

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Almost free
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Expensive way; get 20 of the foam/gel mechanisms. Place on trees in circle pattern around structure. I'd say 100 yards around too. It's a bit crazy but might work. I'd also probably put a few in random locations depending how large your property is. . .
 

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If I had a voice I'd sing
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If you're talking about rural land, no. In large scale wildfires, creating fire breaks will not help much.
...I was told the flames reached up to 75 ft. high and winds were between 20 and 40 mph, which blew burning debris across a four lane highway with climbing lane shoulders on each side, and caught land across the highway on fire.

In a real wildfire situation, there's not much you can do.
Yeah. I live in the Lolo National Forest. I'm pretty sure that a 100 ft or even a 100 yard fire break isn't going to do a damn thing if the forest around me is on fire. Yet that seems to be the most common advice... It can't hurt, but in the middle of the forest, it might not help at all.

If the nearby forest is on fire, the wood structure of the house will probably reach combustion temperatures without direct contact with embers.

The only answer is to keep combustible materials from reaching ignition temperature. An underground or concrete home, where combustibles are insulated by the earth or concrete, would be ideal. But who actually does such a thing? I mean really? I have a Wife, and she does not approve... Not to mention the cost involved. If I didn't have a Wife, and if I had more money I would do it, but.... I like having the Wife.

For years I've been thinking about putting a sprinkler system on the roof, to spray water there and keep everything cool. Not sure if it would work though. Might need sprinklers aimed at the walls also to keep them cool and it still might not work. But there is a chance it could make a difference....
 

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If you're talking about rural land, no. In large scale wildfires, creating fire breaks will not help much.
I disagree. Wlidfire swept through here 2 summers ago and only three structures were lost; two garages and one home. They were the only structures that hadn't taken advantage of the fire break program offered out here and the fire department couldn't protect them from the burning foliage. All the other homes, and there were dozens, survived without damage because they were properly landscaped with fire breaks in mind. Grant it, there are very few tall trees out here, mostly Junipers, but it worked for us. I suggest it because being on the local fire department it not only saves structures, but lives as well when we don't have to needlessly risk our lives protecting structures of people who could have done more to help not only themselves, but us as well.

Feel free though to landscape as you please, and if there's nothing we can do we'll spray foam on your house (if we can), pull back to a safe area, and watch it burn. :thumb:
 

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Where my land is, there are no other homes, no one around. Nothing except thousands of acres of land.

What one person may call country or rural is not necessarily what another calls it. BOL is, I think, unless I am greatly mistaken, by definition fairly rural. Or I would think it safe to assume that is the meaning. Now in an area with multiple homes, such as a subdivision, which is what I am assuming you are talking about based on dozens of homes and landscaping and such, with a local fire dept., yes, fire breaks and calling in pumper trucks would work well. But if it's bug out land we're talking about, I am assuming rural, and somewhat unpopulated, and by definition at a distance from towns and burghs.

Soi if you mean an area where there are no homes, no one around, and the 'local' fire dept. is 30, 40, or 50 miles away, sorry, I have to disagree with the whole firebreaks and calling the fire dept. to come in and put things out. In a very rural area with no natural fire breaks, where tens of thousands of acres are burning at a time (as was the case in the photos I posted) there really isn't a lot you can do. Had a friend who lost her home in the wildfires and they had nothing but short mown grass for about 200' all around their home. It was burning debris carried by the heat driven wind that caught the roof of their brick home on fire, and the short mown native buffalo grass that caught everything else on fire. They pumped their pool to try to stop it, but it wasn't enough. Lots of rural homes in that town met the same fate, unfortunately.
 
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