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I was kicking myself for not planting anything this year. I recently moved and have a few acres and some great soil now. Only problem is, I have no idea what I should grow. I'm in NY state about 1.5 hrs from NYC.

I want to grow something practical and realistic for a first timer. If you guys have any suggestions or experience you can share I would be most grateful.
 

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Start with what you like to eat. Corn, potatoes, tomatoes...? Check what zone you are in. Look at what the growing season is and that will help you pick things that will actually ripen; if your season is short, you want varieties that will ripen quickly. Look for open pollinated vegetables and fruits; hybrids, you can't save the seeds and grow them the next year and get the same crop. Don't pick too many varieties...which is hard not to do because the seed catalogs are full of cool stuff to grow. You can start just about anything from seed, but that is a whole 'nuther ball o' wax.

Check out Dave's Garden . In the Dave's Garden forums, anything you see without a red * is free, and that's a lot [all the beginner stuff is free].
 

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be sure and grow some potatoes.dont go over board with plantings to start out with.if you want tomatoes for canning the romas are the best for that.they have more meat and when you can them have less of a watered down texture to them than other varities.one of the best varities of taters is kennebec .its a white potato and also try red pontiac they are a red skinned tater.if i could only grow 3 things it would be taters,tomatoes and onions.because these are good bases for lots of diferent meals.like salsa,vegtable soups,chili's,baked taters fries..well you get the picture.if you want to try green beans try blue lakes....they are awesome.a sall effort wil yield lots of goodies like.....

this




salsa that i put in freezer






hope this helps and the pics inspire you and good luck
 

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Zomby Woof
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Be careful growing Cherry & Grape tomatoes. They will sometimes get out of hand and take over. We had a ton this year. We put about 8 pounds in brown paper bags and put them in the basement in August and they are still good. The CO2 produced by the tomatoes keeps the oxidation to a minimum.
I think the previous posters have the right answers.
Make sure and plant a couple of apple trees, apples can be stored in brown paper bags as well.
 

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Start with what you like to eat. Corn, potatoes, tomatoes...? Check what zone you are in. Look at what the growing season is and that will help you pick things that will actually ripen; if your season is short, you want varieties that will ripen quickly.
This is good advice. Keep in mind that even quick maturing varieties may take longer than expected to reach harvest in cold climates.

Look for open pollinated vegetables and fruits; hybrids, you can't save the seeds and grow them the next year and get the same crop. ... You can start just about anything from seed, but that is a whole 'nuther ball o' wax.
This is where I disagree with you. I don't think there is anything wrong with the selective use of hybrids, and for some species it is madness (in my opinion) to bother with saving seed at this point in time. For the average gardener, saving seed from sweet corn is impractical because it takes a population of 200 good plants to prevent inbreeding depression. In addition, a lot of OP seeds out there are being produced by amateurs with variable standards of quality control. I bought some OP 'Amish Pie' pumpkin seeds this year. Of the five vines which reached maturity I obtained three quite different-looking pumpkins.

Even if undeader uses only OP varieties there is no guarantee his crops will breed true if there are other varieties of the same species in the area.

There are many advantages to growing hybrid varieties of some vegetable species. Hybrids tend to grow vigorously, produce uniform results, have high yields and are often specifically bred for certain characteristics like frost and disease resistance or drought tolerance. I would encourage new gardeners to try hybrids* specifically because they are more likely to be successful with them. Once they have some experience, knowledge and a few successes behind them, then let them worry about saving seed and making the decision about whether to grow OP varieties. Seed is pretty cheap compared to the time, effort and other resources you put into your garden.

*I would not usually bother growing hybrid varieties of: peas, beans, lettuce, tomato, peppers (sweet or hot), eggplant, melon or pumpkin unless I was setting out to do a breeding experiment. Next year I intend to try two such experiments, one with tomatoes and the other with pumpkin.
 
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