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Several years ago I had a bonfire in the field behind my house. We talked about this in the transplanting pepper plants thread.

I found out if there is too much potash (potassium) in the soil, the potash will prevent the uptake of nitrogen to the plant. To counter this, use a high nitrogen fertilizer which makes the soil more acidic.

Just about everything I planted in this patch of soil has not grown.

Potatoes - rotted in the ground

Purple hull peas - dd not come up.

Snap beans - did not come up.

Pepper plants - most died and others are not growing.

I am going to move over and replant everything in an area not affected by the bonfire.


For 2019, I am thinking about planting the area with corn, and using a very high nitrogen fertilizer. The high nitrogen should turn the soil slightly acidic.
 

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Several years ago I had a bonfire in the field behind my house. We talked about this in the transplanting pepper plants thread.

I found out if there is too much potash (potassium) in the soil, the potash will prevent the uptake of nitrogen to the plant. To counter this, use a high nitrogen fertilizer which makes the soil more acidic.

Just about everything I planted in this patch of soil has not grown.

Potatoes - rotted in the ground

Purple hull peas - dd not come up.

Snap beans - did not come up.

Pepper plants - most died and others are not growing.

I am going to move over and replant everything in an area not affected by the bonfire.

I Made a Big Mistake Spring Garden 2018 - YouTube

For 2019, I am thinking about planting the area with corn, and using a very high nitrogen fertilizer. The high nitrogen should turn the soil slightly acidic.
We added too much ash right before planting last year and it caused problems like you are describing. Good thing you are in Texas,not much of a growing season here in Mn,mistakes in gardening really hurt!

We uncovered an old fire pile when we moved to our ten acres and it grew one heck of a crop of mint!
 

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We added too much ash right before planting last year and it caused problems like you are describing. Good thing you are in Texas,not much of a growing season here in Mn,mistakes in gardening really hurt!

We uncovered an old fire pile when we moved to our ten acres and it grew one heck of a crop of mint!
Thank you.

This puts me a month behind schedule. However, some of the plants will produce until the first frost.

Unless the heat kills the plants, I should have several months of good growing season.

I am hoping to move over away from the ash affected area and replant everything. I lost some money, but it was a lesson learned.

Something I really hoping to grow a lot of this year was peppers. Hopefully there is still time for that.
 

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I definitely want to grow peppers! I’m going to try to cross jalapeño and bell peppers in an attempt to make hot bells! Right now our garden is still thawing out,at least we are getting sun and warm temps although a bit of rain would help to drive the frost out.

Have a good day Kev,I have to hand dig drainage ditches today so off I go!
 

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You should still be able to get hot peppers to set when you replant. When night time temps get into the 80s and daytime temps are in the 90s, pollen will become sterile and the flowers will drop off the plants because they don't pollinate.

Plant the quickest maturing varieties you can get.
 

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You should still be able to get hot peppers to set when you replant. When night time temps get into the 80s and daytime temps are in the 90s, pollen will become sterile and the flowers will drop off the plants because they don't pollinate.
It happens every year! I've found that if I can just keep the plants healthy until temps cool down a bit towards fall, they'll pick up where they left off and make more peppers. The peppers don't seem to be as big but they're peppers nonetheless. :D:
 

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My grandparents (who have grown peppers every year for I don't know how long) seem to have the best luck planting them in containers under the eaves of their open sided metal building. Cherry tomatoes also do really well in containers for them.
 
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