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I have one old one and the handle is broke and its pretty pitted, so I'm needing a new one. Can someone here give me a recommendation?
 

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Personally I'd avoid Machetes, they are a one-trick-pony.

Malaysian Parangs or Nepalese Kukris are just as good choppers (if not better) and the blades are more versatile. Both of them are designed to deliver the "sweet spot" of the blade at an oblique angle providing better cutting. The Kukri is also a good stabber and carver as well. I'm not sure if the parang can be used that way

Oh - and avoid the cheap Cold Steel stuff. Their expensive stuff is meant to be OK, but the cheap stuff is just sheet metal with an edge put on it.

I'm not kidding.

I bought my kukri from Tora Blades. They get their stuff in batches from the craftsmen in Nepal who they deal with, so they go for long periods with a lot of stuff out of stock. But the level of quality is worth waiting for.

EDIT - Oh and this Tibetan Kukri looks good for lots of chopping. It has a 14" blade. I wouldn't be afraid to wonder off into the woods if I had one of those by my side and some firesteel in my pocket ;)..... well, and a few other things :thumb: but you get the idea.
 

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Avoid machetes ?
You're obviously well traveled :D:

Tramontina. Brazilian.
My gardener carries one that he has used daily for 15 years.
I never said there was anything wrong with machetes, just that there are better knives out there - particularly for use in places like the United States. Parangs and Kukris cope better with hardwood forests because of the curve in the blade, whereas machetes are intended for chopping less "woody" vegetation.

I'm sure the machete is ideally suited for the environment in which it was created. In places like the South American rain forest I'm sure it is perfect. In the Pacific Northwest, I think you need something with a bit more of a weight-forward chopping action.
 

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make sure to spend at least $500 or more on your machete!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

anything less is sheetmetal from the junkyard with a brick-sharpened cutting edge! ah hahahahahahahahahahahahaha
 

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Personally I'd avoid Machetes, they are a one-trick-pony.


Malaysian Parangs or Nepalese Kukris are just as good choppers (if not better) and the blades are more versatile. Both of them are designed to deliver the "sweet spot" of the blade at an oblique angle providing better cutting. The Kukri is also a good stabber and carver as well. I'm not sure if the parang can be used that way

Oh - and avoid the cheap Cold Steel stuff. Their expensive stuff is meant to be OK, but the cheap stuff is just sheet metal with an edge put on it.



I'm not kidding.



I bought my kukri from Tora Blades. They get their stuff in batches from the craftsmen in Nepal who they deal with, so they go for long periods with a lot of stuff out of stock. But the level of quality is worth waiting for.

EDIT - Oh and this Tibetan Kukri looks good for lots of chopping. It has a 14" blade. I wouldn't be afraid to wonder off into the woods if I had one of those by my side and some firesteel in my pocket ;)..... well, and a few other things :thumb: but you get the idea.

Avoid machetes, huh. These are the universal cuttings tools of any underdeveloped nation. Go to the jungles of Brazil, Mexico, Florida and Georgia swamps, almost the entire African continent don't forget India and Asia. thousands, not millions oh forget the some billion people across the globe that use these tools for everyday survival. While I will not say that some specialized tool would not be better at a certain thing. Machetes have proven themselves across the globe under all conditions for many of years. You can and will not go wrong with a quality machete.


This is a personal opinion and I do agree that Cold steel does have some cheaper lines of cutting instruments but any of there machetes are well within handling any task of cutting brush, vines and foliage you might encounter with ease, along with the ease of sharpenability due to its softer steel. The thing about machetes is, that they are so cheap you can buy many different blades styles from different manufactures and find out what you like best. I personally own 4 different cold steel machetes and my two favorites are the kukri and the bolo. Mind you the handle on the kukri will need to be filed down it is to aggresive without this and will cause blisters. For those with medium to small size hands the bolo's handle will be too big and need grinding to a smaller and better ergonomic fit. After that the steel will hold up to whatever you need it to do within reason of machete work.

To offer suggestions I have heard that tramotinas are great for the money. Just figure out what you are looking for. Machetes come in many different sizes from 12 inches to 24. I find the larger 24 inches are to long for my uses. For utility work I prefer a blade around 18 inches and for my truck machete I like the 13 inch kukri. In my home as a last defense backup weapon to my firearms is my cold steel spear point machete which is nice at 12 inches. Big enough to dispatch any goblin yet small enough to be manuverable in the confines of a building and cheap enough to not be upset once turned over to law enforcement in case of an encounter.

With all that said, stick to reputable manufactures try out two or three and for under 60-80 bucks you can figure out what you like best and have two others for spares or to hand out in case the need be. Some marketers being Tramotina, Ontario, Cold Steel, and Martindale.
 

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If you want something that chops hardwoods better think about a hatchet or youth axe. If you need the length of the machete try as suggested a golok or parang. Martindale has the number 2 golok which will need to be reprofiled to get maximum efficiency out of it but does have solid and comfortable handle IMHO. Or look at Bark River's golok and some of the short swords from filipino weapons such as the barong or their golok.
 

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Avoid machetes, huh. These are the universal cuttings tools of any underdeveloped nation.... Cold steel does have some cheaper lines of cutting instruments but any of there machetes are well within handling any task of cutting brush, vines and foliage you might encounter with ease, along with the ease of sharpenability due to its softer steel.
That's exactly what I said. But if you want to cut something stronger like, say, a small tree, there are better knives out there.

Regarding the softness, personally I would want a knife that retains it edge reasonably well, especially for survival

I personally own 4 different cold steel machetes and my two favorites are the kukri and the bolo.
The Cold Steet kukri machete is not a true machete. It has a curved blade that makes it more like a weird cross between a machete, a Parang and a Kukri. However, it has an extremely flexible blade due to the fact that it is made out of hardened sheet metal. Nepalese Kukris have rigid blades, and the good ones are hand forged out of truck springs by master craftsmen.

They handle like a cross between an axe and a knife. That's maybe not to everyone's taste, but it works for me :thumb:

If you're gonna be hacking through foliage and doing some light chopping and maybe even building bushcraft shelters then I would have thought a parang (which is the Malaysian equivalent to a machete) was best. If you also want to be able to cut meat, prepare game, scare the poop out of the taliban, cut firewood and carve with your knife, a good sized Kukri will serve you better. Or you can do what Ray Mears does - carry a Parang and an axe. Eithers good ;)
 

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my .02's , i like the bud-k swamp monster. I know alot of there gear is junk, but there are a few gems to be found. I actually got it for free from them, they go for under 20$ tho. It's made from 1/4 in steel holds a decent edge, and I havent been able to break it(i did try). After alot of abuse its earned the right to enter my circle of trusted gear.

Whatever you get, get two try and destroy one and use the other. Thats how i test most of my gear. Or get one abuse the crap out of it and if it survives keep it, if not it didn't break when it counted. Just my .02
 

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There is a machete called the woodsmans pal, it is good. I'm not quite used to its design yet but is feels ok. By far my favorite for a lightweight is the onterio line of machetes. There is a vid on youtube of a guy using his 12inch model.

For heavy wood work, you really cant beat the Ka-bar line, they are very thick and weighty so they glide right through about anything.

If you can, find a golock or perang (SP?) there just about perfect for everything. if not any of the onterio or Ka-bar's will do just fine.
 

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I would offer the Woodman's Pal as a reasonable example of a useful machete. I've used mine for camping and around the land clean-up. Works great! If you buy the nostalgia books that came with the original WW2 issue, they explain how to use the WP to defeat a (Japanese) sword, so it's a fighting blade, too. It's also been in the US inventory since 1941, so it's been tried out for awhile. I personally like the original leather handle with the guard as it has a more cushioned effect when chopping hard wood, over the wood handled model.
 

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I have to agree that the OP's area of operation seems more suited to a hatchet. But he is asking about a machete. I have a Cold Steel and US military surplus machete. The Cold Steel is definitely made of softer steel. While it will manage to cut through hardwood with alot of effort, the edge will be severely blunted in the process. The good news is that it sharpens back up quickly. The handle on my Cold Steel is also not as ergonomic as the US surplus. The US military issue machete is of much higher quality, and holds a much better edge. Compared to the US military issue machete, the Cold Steel one seems like cheap junk. And I almost forgot, the Cold Steel sheath...complete piece of crap.
 

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Has anyone seen this? Pretty impressive!

http://www.knifetests.com/ColdSteelKukriMacheteDestructionTest.html

Granted you probably won't be cutting up cinder blocks or steel tubing...but it's good to know it's possible! :upsidedown:

Try the Cold Steel line, they're killer! They actually come with a descent edge and the sheath is ok. The kukri is a mean chopper, I'm not sure what you'll be using it for. If it's more for weed/brush clearance, then I'd say go with a latin or bolo style machete. Either way, they hold up pretty well. When I sharpen my machetes, I use a V sharpener locked in a bench vice. Just pull the blade towards you a few times a you'll have a descent edge back. For major touch ups/ sharpenings, I use the V sharpener first to get the blade shape back, followed by a file to give it a more fine edge, then a wetstone/diamond sharpener to really get it sharp. The final test is a 2 liter bottle filled with water. If it slices it in half without disturbing the bottom half, it passes! I also like to cord wrap my handles. Have fun!
 
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