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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do I really need a -40 degree sleeping bag for MY BOL in the wilds of the Rocky Mountains? Could a 0 degree sleeping bag suffice? I'm looking at quality as well as WEIGHT and price to be the main issues.

I'm building my BOB, putting in ALL the pieces I deem necessary for a dire eotwawki situation or having to run from the law or on and on and on. I need my gear to be lean and mean.

Here's what I have in my possession so far:

Ka-Bar Cutlass
Fallkniven A2
Tool Logic SP3 (sharpener, LED light)
Firesteel Blastmaster
600 ft. 550 Parachord
Ziplock bags of lint
12 lbs. of Beef Jerky
A metal pot


What I still intend on purchasing (please help me out):

Tent - I'm looking at a High Peak 6lbs. tent
Backpack - although I have one, I'm looking for 5-600 cubic cm, again High Peak
Sleeping bag - I'm perusing the High Peak brands - Do I need -40 degree for the worst coldness I could possibly imagine?? Or would a 0 degree bag be enough if I just wear heavy woolen clothes to sleep in?
Water filtration - don't know here, looking at Katadyn but my Main question is: how many uses will a filter last? and how many years worth of filters would I be able to carry until death?
A multipurpose knife - looking at either a Gerber or a Leatherman
Maybe an Axe
A shovel - possibly a folding one with a handle that can be used as a hammer.


I can't think of anything else. Fill me in.

I thought about either a .40 glock or colt 1911 or high-capacity 9mm for self defense against intruders into my camp, be it man or beast.

Thanks,

JustADude
 

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The Rockies, eh? That's the defining characteristic; you'll get tons of advice on the nuiances of this sleeping bag v. that sleeping bag, tents, stoves, etc. But the key is versatility and for you warmth (the real NOLS training actually promotes staying cool) and dryness. All i can say is concentrate on good layered technical clothing, woolen socks, a stove that you can operate well in the cold and higher elevations and get fuel easily for. Sacrifice your weight restrictions for a good 4 season tent if you plan on moving around in the bush vs. making a little hovel. That weight thing might also apply to two less warm bags. I'd add a silnylon tarp, some freeze dried packages of food, and very basic medical supplies and start eating that 12 pounds of beef jerky. Maybe you should also consider going into the area you might be thinking about and burying some equipment and provisions now in well sealed containers.

You don't leave much detail specific to the Rockies, but a .40 Glock or M 1911 are certainly great when you need them (like a parachute) but worthless, heavy, and awkward when you don't. I'd stick with a smaller caliber rifle or maybe an SKS. You can defend yourself and hunt.

Good luck...
 

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Earthwalker.
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I live in England and it gets very cold here and i use a minus 15 which keeps me plenty warm.
 

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trois pour cent
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First off, it's been my experience that a sleeping bag rating is always inaccurate. A bag rated at +15 does not mean you will be comfortable at +15, you just won't freeze.
I'm no rambo type, but did receive survival training when I worked as a flight nurse. We were taught to dress and equip to survive the terrain over which we flew. So that's the way I continue to pack.

So what are the temperature's you will be traveling through? That's what you need to equip for.

Also, you can achieve warmth through layering. You can get a 0 bag and purchase a shell for the outside. Add a nice liner for the inside. By using this layered approach, you can be very comfortable. In the summer I often just take by liner. Winter trip in the snow, all three.

If I were you, I"d borrow some equipment and go camping now, with someone more experienced, in the harsh winter conditions. You will learn pretty quickly what you do and don't need.
 

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+1 on the shell/bivy bag which will add a layer of insulation and that way it should increase the rating and give you something to keep dry if something happens to the tent. Awful lot of snow in the rockies though. I'd be tempted to get Everest climbing gear. Smartwool or Icebreaker morino wool layers. Expedition grade Katadyn ceramic fliter and a Steripen with the rechargeable case which will help with a AA flashlight. The last thing you need is your filter to become useless because of some tiny plastic bit.

I've looked at the Gerber folding shovel and didn't like that it wouldn't telescope out much so instead of it's compactness I'm thinking of going with the Cold Steel shovel with a wooden handle and lashing it to the pack, which is an Eberstock Stalker.
 

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The beauty of having the tent and bivy redundancy is maybe using them together in real extreme situations or creating a second "red herring" site or a bail out position. That is of course for real shtf situations.
 

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free man
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A given bags performance changes from person to person(warm/cold sleepers). Theres an old mtneering say.. "if you were in your shelter..while in your bag..while in all your layers..and were JUST warm enough on the coldest night of a given trip..then you brought the right bag. This is the extreme, but you get the idea. Techniques like a hot water bottle in the bag, more layers, wearing head/face gear, eating just before going to sleep, etc all help too. Don't forget that pee bottle(cheap Gatoraid big mouth 20oz rocks) too :). Awesome not having to go out in windy -2* temps just to pee at 4am. Yes indeedy.

-40 will be too much bag for 99.999% of the time, if ever, unless you pack 'alot' in deep winter while up high. Using this logic, one can "what if" themselves into a heavyarse pack for sure.

I try to have bags that cover a range of conditions..

Summer to 3 season->40* Western Mtneering Highlite. Weighs only 16oz w stuff sack. Nerf football size. Goes down to 28-30+ or so with a layer or 2 and or bivy bag or tent. $260.

3-season to mild winter->Western Mtneering Ultralite at 20*(usually what I use in the Rockies during early Spring above treeline, which is still winter conditions for sure). Weight is 1lb 8oz including sack. I've used it down to zero IN my tent before. Had all my cloths on tho w down booties, but was fine. $330

..or a Marmot Dryloft Pinnacle. 15* at 2lb 5oz. $450

Winter->Install the highlite bag(59" girth) inside the 61" girth Dryloft Marmot Pinnacle for about -10 degrees(remember, its about 10 degrees warmer inside a buttoned up 4 season tent then the outside temp).

I only use a bivy cover if I'm going floorless.

If your truly in 10* or below temps alot, then a filter will just freeze up when the water hits the small dia tubes. Hopefully you'll have snow to melt(but you need 'some' water in the pot w the snow to do this effectively, btw) in that case(In that case and while camping, l'll use a trash bag, pack rain cover, etc..to drag a ton of snow into my vestibule or in front of the tent door, so I can later melt it at my leisure while still in the bag, since it takes a ton of snow to get just a liter or 2 of water. This minimizes ones exposure to the elements over and over when its not needed).

I used to live for solo winter backpacking here in the NC mtns.
 

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i had woundered the same thing until a buddy asked me if i would be sleeping dressed or not? how many people in the tent? how hot do u like to be asleep?
 

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To secure peace is to...
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Do I really need a -40 degree sleeping bag for MY BOL in the wilds of the Rocky Mountains? Could a 0 degree sleeping bag suffice? I'm looking at quality as well as WEIGHT and price to be the main issues.

I'm building my BOB, putting in ALL the pieces I deem necessary for a dire eotwawki situation or having to run from the law or on and on and on. I need my gear to be lean and mean.

Here's what I have in my possession so far:

Ka-Bar Cutlass
Fallkniven A2
Tool Logic SP3 (sharpener, LED light)
Firesteel Blastmaster
600 ft. 550 Parachord
Ziplock bags of lint
12 lbs. of Beef Jerky
A metal pot


What I still intend on purchasing (please help me out):

Tent - I'm looking at a High Peak 6lbs. tent
Backpack - although I have one, I'm looking for 5-600 cubic cm, again High Peak
Sleeping bag - I'm perusing the High Peak brands - Do I need -40 degree for the worst coldness I could possibly imagine?? Or would a 0 degree bag be enough if I just wear heavy woolen clothes to sleep in?
Water filtration - don't know here, looking at Katadyn but my Main question is: how many uses will a filter last? and how many years worth of filters would I be able to carry until death?
A multipurpose knife - looking at either a Gerber or a Leatherman
Maybe an Axe
A shovel - possibly a folding one with a handle that can be used as a hammer.


I can't think of anything else. Fill me in.

I thought about either a .40 glock or colt 1911 or high-capacity 9mm for self defense against intruders into my camp, be it man or beast.

Thanks,

JustADude
I'll address the sleeping bag issue. Save your money and buy the best you can afford. I've never camped/hiked in the Rockies, but I guarantee you will freeze in a 0 degree bag. I have one 20 degree bag and you will definitely be uncomfortable at 20 degrees. Buy the best you can. Save longer if you have to.

Also, a 6 lbs tent is pretty heft. Save and try to get near 4.5 lbs. 6 lbs is a bear.

Remember, in backpacking, you pay for things to weigh less. The cheaper you buy, the more it weighs. I always try to shoot for the midrange backpacks, tents, sleeping bags etc. Sometimes the fractions of ounces don't justify the dollars.
 

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High Peak? Sounds like junk no offense. If you want a good backpack nonmilitary surplus aka ALICE/MOLLE type packs invest in a good 5K-7K cubic inch internal frame pack from Osprey, Lowe Alpine, Dana Designs, Gregory, etc. You can find great deals on ebay. Also MysteryRanch are expensive but amazing packs. As for a sleeping bag you don't need a -40. that's overkill, even for the Rockies. Plus they weigh too damn much. 0 degree is plenty. spend a few more dollars and get a nice 650 or 850 fill down bag with a nice water resistant shell. Heck you might even look at those modular miliarty surplus bags with the gore tex shell on ebay for $150 or less.
 

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Bleach blonde on fire :p
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I made sleeping bags out of down (real down no fillers) comforters I bought on clearance at Wally world. I made them out of king size blankets, because of the down they also pack down really small. I made a nylon outer shell to keep them somewhat clean. We use them when winter camping (sometimes around 10 degrees in a tent) and sleep in the bare, they keep us plenty warm. I basically have 2 layers on top and 1 on bottom ( I used a 3rd comforter to fill the spaces with extra down in the spaces under us to better insulate us from the cold.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
High Peak? Sounds like junk no offense. If you want a good backpack nonmilitary surplus aka ALICE/MOLLE type packs invest in a good 5K-7K cubic inch internal frame pack from Osprey, Lowe Alpine, Dana Designs, Gregory, etc. You can find great deals on ebay. Also MysteryRanch are expensive but amazing packs. As for a sleeping bag you don't need a -40. that's overkill, even for the Rockies. Plus they weigh too damn much. 0 degree is plenty. spend a few more dollars and get a nice 650 or 850 fill down bag with a nice water resistant shell. Heck you might even look at those modular miliarty surplus bags with the gore tex shell on ebay for $150 or less.
You said "Sounds like junk," but do you really know? Thanks for all the advice. I'm thinking hard on this right now. My friends say I'm lucky to have a job. I tell them that I'm buying a whole bunch of survival gear. They look clueless when I tell them that. They think I'm just buying MREs or something, but I'm buying a whole lot more. No sense telling them what I'm buying. They'll think I'm going crazy or something.

I will continue to build my stack. It's all on the living room floor laid out and beautiful. I'd say I'm 50% ready for SHTF, material-wise. Skinning-a-buck and spinning a trot line, I'm not so ready, but I'll be there as soon as I can get up to speed. I have a good "sense" especially in my job, of being thrown into the unknown and fighting like hell to get what needs to be done, done, no matter what. My getter done factor is way up.

I have half of the tools. Just need a few more.

The tent is my future house, possibly. The bag, my new bed. The knife, parachord, water filter, firesteel, my new job so-to-speak.

This is no laughing matter. In survival, I know, time is of the essence. You snooze, you lose, everything.

I'm just here to kill, eat, sleep, kill, eat, sleep.


Also, what color should your backpack be in a shtf never turning back scenario? Bright colors or camo/blendy colors? Thanks.
 

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for extra heat a tent and a therma-rest go along ways, a good tent will shield you from rain and wind and a therma-rest provides insularion that makes a world of difference, also if it's not cold you will startvsweating in your bag and want to get out of it ( that can be extremely annoying for the person if any camping with you, they express this by staring at you angrily all morning for keeping them up, LOL) anyway those two things will heavy they are what I take backpacking, which is more or less like bugging out for a few days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
for extra heat a tent and a therma-rest go along ways, a good tent will shield you from rain and wind and a therma-rest provides insularion that makes a world of difference, also if it's not cold you will startvsweating in your bag and want to get out of it ( that can be extremely annoying for the person if any camping with you, they express this by staring at you angrily all morning for keeping them up, LOL) anyway those two things will heavy they are what I take backpacking, which is more or less like bugging out for a few days.
Can't thank ya'll enough. Just bought a therm-a-rest. I'm soooo tempted to get a Mystery Ranch or Kifaru. Also, for protection from rain, I might need this? http://www.seatosummit.com/products/display/6

I plan on humping 70-80 lbs. in a shtf/edtwawki situation. I will work on my kids/wife's packs later, all rdy to go, fo sho.
 

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Can't thank ya'll enough. Just bought a therm-a-rest. I'm soooo tempted to get a Mystery Ranch or Kifaru. Also, for protection from rain, I might need this? http://www.seatosummit.com/products/display/6

I plan on humping 70-80 lbs. in a shtf/edtwawki situation. I will work on my kids/wife's packs later, all rdy to go, fo sho.
If hauling 80 lbs is your goal,you might want to think of putting some or all of it on wheels.80 lbs is a lot of weight to hump.
 
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