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Wow! Those Blizzard Lanterns are big! I ordered four Blizzard Lanterns and two extra globes from Lehman's last week and they arrived today. One of the lanterns globe had a couple of long thin bubbles that extended from the top edge, down toward the bottom for about 1 1/4" and had cracked. I called Lehman's and they apologized for the inconvenience and pledged to ship another globe immediately. You can't beat service like that and at $14.95 each, you can't beat that price either.

 

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I bought three excellent USA made Dietz lamps at a swamp meet a few weekends ago for $25.00. They had red globes so I bought three clear ones from Lehmans.
 

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I've had Dietz lanterns for many years due to hurricanes. They've never failed me. Good stuff. Don't forget extra wicks for the long term.
Yeah, I was going to order the 50' roll but couldn't find it on their site for the 7/8" wick. I'll have to search for the roll-o-wick somewhere else of buy the precut type.
 

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I bought three excellent USA made Dietz lamps at a swamp meet a few weekends ago for $25.00. They had red globes so I bought three clear ones from Lehmans.
Unfortunately Dietz lanterns are not made in their country of origin (Germany) but in China now.
 

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Actually, Dietz lanterns were American made until they started making them in China in the mid 1950's. Before that the Dietz bros started the company in the mid 1850's, and were manufactured in New York, NY. Later after fire burned down the plant, Dietz absorbed the Steam Fuage and Lantern company in Syracuse, and began manufaturing them there, as they already owned 50% of SG&L.
But even though the newer Dietz are made in China...they're still pretty well made. A good German lantern is Fuerhand.
 

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generally which is more expensive, longer shelf life & useage?
thanx
Kerosene is cheaper, but smells more and there are different grades.
1 Red dyed kerosene- is the cheapest but has the most smell, and gums up wicks faster. I would recommend it for outdoor use, especially if anyone in the house has respiratory issues.

2 K-1 kerosene- still pretty cheap but much less smell, pretty good for indoor usage. If you have no respiratory issues use this.

3. Synthetic Kerosene- the best bang for the buck for anyone with respiratory issues or those who are very sensitive to odors.

4. Lamp oil- the most expensive, but it smells kinda like you were frying something and supposedly puts out the most light.

The shelf life on all these products is so long in a sealed container that I wouldn't worry about it. If no water gets in them they will last longer than you will. They also make scent for kerosene that will help with the odor sensitive, but not with respiratory issues. A gallon of kerosene can last for 200 hours in a large hurricane lantern, if you don't spill any.
 

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Actually, Dietz lanterns were American made until they started making them in China in the mid 1950's. Before that the Dietz bros started the company in the mid 1850's, and were manufactured in New York, NY. Later after fire burned down the plant, Dietz absorbed the Steam Fuage and Lantern company in Syracuse, and began manufaturing them there, as they already owned 50% of SG&L.
But even though the newer Dietz are made in China...they're still pretty well made. A good German lantern is Fuerhand.
I have a Dietz No. 8 Air Pilot that I bought back in 1973, that is used every year for camping and power outages, and to this day has never failed me yet. I did just look on the bottom and found a sticker that says "Made in the Peoples Republic of China", can't remember ever seeing a sticker like that.
 

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have 2 No.8 Dietz lanterns that I used for about 5 yrs to do my barn work they do give a decent amount of light and are fuel efficient.I wouldn't worry to much about wick for these lights mine still have the originals in them.Don't use the dyed Kero though it will destroy a wick quickly.If you want another good lamp for indoor use get a RAYO they give off about as much light as a Alladin but are very cheap in price,but are set up like the Dietz as far as being a air pilot type lamp.We have 7 of them and the most expensive was 12.00.But if you get one the globe from a regular lamp is to small in diameter it is actually an 1/8 in bigger.
Pangea glad you got the Dietz and good luck but don't overfill it,only 3/4 full or it will appear to be leaking when it isn't.
 

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I just ordered a #8 Deitz. I am a lantern beginner, and I am a bit confused on what to burn in it. I know kerosene works fine.

I keep paraffin lamp oil for my glass lamps. It has basically no smell or smoke. It is the ultra-pure oil. I keep this well stocked for my lamps. Will this work well in the #8?

If not, how much smell is produced during indoor use with the clear kerosene in a #8?

Any other tips on Dietz lanterns would be appreciated.

Sorry if this is considered a thread hijack!
 

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Actually, Dietz lanterns were American made until they started making them in China in the mid 1950's. Before that the Dietz bros started the company in the mid 1850's, and were manufactured in New York, NY. Later after fire burned down the plant, Dietz absorbed the Steam Fuage and Lantern company in Syracuse, and began manufaturing them there, as they already owned 50% of SG&L.
But even though the newer Dietz are made in China...they're still pretty well made. A good German lantern is Fuerhand.
I stand corrected.

Despite my geographic error, my underlying point was that Dietz is made now in a communist nation with huge human rights problems. I just wanted to remind folks of that just in case they boycott Chinese products like I do.

From the Dietz Lantern Company's own web site ... their history:

http://www.lanternnet.com/history.htm
 

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Of all the supplies I've bought over the years I consider my Dietz lanterns among my best purchases. They've never let us down. The only problem I've had with them is on a camping trip it started to rain and the cold rain hitting the glass globe broke the globe. That was my fault for not protecting the lantern, far as I can see.

Elmo, you can use the lamp oil but it is the most expensive way to go. These babies will burn kerosene and camping fuel (Coleman) also. Probably would even burn Olive Oil though I have not tried that. I'm working on kerosene now as the lamp oil proves to expensive and it burns quick. I do use an additive to cut down on the smell and I keep a window cracked a bit for fresh air.

One tip I'll pass on from another post - put a mirror behind your lamp or lantern. It increases the light because of the reflection.
 

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Of all the supplies I've bought over the years I consider my Dietz lanterns among my best purchases. They've never let us down. The only problem I've had with them is on a camping trip it started to rain and the cold rain hitting the glass globe broke the globe. That was my fault for not protecting the lantern, far as I can see.

Elmo, you can use the lamp oil but it is the most expensive way to go. These babies will burn kerosene and camping fuel (Coleman) also. Probably would even burn Olive Oil though I have not tried that. I'm working on kerosene now as the lamp oil proves to expensive and it burns quick. I do use an additive to cut down on the smell and I keep a window cracked a bit for fresh air.

One tip I'll pass on from another post - put a mirror behind your lamp or lantern. It increases the light because of the reflection.
Good point about using a lantern in the rain, and using a mirror. However Coleman fuel is not much different from gasoline and can make your lantern "run away" on you. Basically you will light it and after a short time there will be flames burning out of the top. Did you mean Coleman kerosene? For a list of fuels you can and cannot use in a hurricane lantern scroll down this page a bit http://www.lanternnet.com/faqs.htm
 

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I stand corrected.

Despite my geographic error, my underlying point was that Dietz is made now in a communist nation with huge human rights problems. I just wanted to remind folks of that just in case they boycott Chinese products like I do.

From the Dietz Lantern Company's own web site ... their history:

http://www.lanternnet.com/history.htm
Pixelguy...A LOT of people think that Dietz is German....I used too... Yep....lot's of info at Woody's site. Woodward Kirkman is a friend. When I had my lantern website he was an invaluable help with info and parts for my restorations. He went to great lengths to put that history info together. He is also the only American lantern manufacturer. He uses some original Dietz info and created his own tooling for the Kirkman brand. Just in case someone wanted to buy American. Of course they cost more...but are at his site. Plus he's a great guy to do business with.

A note:DO NOT USE COLEMAN FUEL IN A WICK LANTERN!! This is extremely dangerous. The fuel has different properties and the flash point is much lower, under 100 degrees F. Coleman fuel is for Coleman lanterns. Kerosene has a higher flash point. There are some references to Kirkman's site above. I highly recommend reading there. He's spent many years compiling the content of the site, and is literally world renown. He's truly an expert in every aspect.
Commercial over....lol

Pangea...good choice on the Blizzard.
 
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