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Adaptable.
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Last night, I went up to the foothills to visit another old friend. We sat at the mountain lodge drinking beer and I got to meet his friends and neighbors. As we discussed the differences between their mountain and my mountain, the SHTF topic came up. And damn if these guys don't have it together. Living in a small village/town in the middle of a national forest, the entire community has worked out food, water and power post SHTF. They have also worked out road closures to stop outsiders from getting in and though we only touched on the notion of defense, it is clear they have put a good amount of thought into closing their community off if things get ugly.

Now, I would never trade places with them. I'm over 100 miles from a town of 75,000, they sit looking down at a suburban basin with over 1,000,000. But I have been trying to find other communities across the country to stay in contact with if SHTF. Their ability to see the local metropolis (about 45 miles away) from their peak-top "Ski-Hut and Radio Shack" could be invaluable for me to get information on the area should I need to come down and get my mom.

The defacto leader of the group is the head of the local S&R team, and we hit it off famously last night, and vowed to stay in touch and try to get radio contact once I get my FCC licenses on the 6th of December.

The reason I've been looking for other enclaves is just this reason. I'm NOT bugging out from my location. I will thrive or die there. I have, however been looking for other groups to get in contact with to share news in case of a communications breakdown, and possibly establish trade relations with in case of some imaginary "extinction level event".

Have any of you established connections with other remote communities for these ends? How have you established them? How formal are they? Do you have communications or mutual support protocols in place? Considering travel to the region would be HIGHLY difficult without the conveniences of civil society, what are some other ways to increase the mutual benefits of such a relationship?
 

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Yes, I am making preps right now with several friends I grew up with.
We have one good friend who is interested in the idea of prepping so we slowly started talking to him about it and he's on board for us to all band together if something happens. Other than that, we have my mum and dad and thats it! :xeye:
 

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All bark, no bite
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I wish we had more like minded people around.
We live in a fairly remote location and plan to stay if anything happens. It would just be nice to have outside resources and info to bounce ideas off of when you have problems.
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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12,005 Posts
I am trying to get to know the people close to my area. I wish I had the money to set up a nice Ham rig. I'd love to get on the 10 meters. I have an old CB that covers the Novice sub band (well, it was when i was 17).

I'd love to have a mountain retreat to retire early to. It would be nice to connnect to other groups via amature radio.
 

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Have any of you established connections with other remote communities for these ends? How have you established them? How formal are they? Do you have communications or mutual support protocols in place? Considering travel to the region would be HIGHLY difficult without the conveniences of civil society, what are some other ways to increase the mutual benefits of such a relationship?
Our community works with several different communities in the upper Mid-West. We have established our connections to these communities by working through our "church". There are many more survival communities out there than most people know about. Some of these communities set themselves up strictly for survival while others are set up for living more simply. If a community is going to survive it needs to have some formal rules and protocols and a governing party of some sort. Our group has monthly meetings in which we work together to keep our community working together, even though we do most of the work alone.

What I find most beneficial now is learning from these groups. Such as the town we live near is small, between 700 and 800 people. They built a community center and one of the groups we talk with told us how to get grants to make the community center off grid. We not only did that but got a grant to take the town hall off grid too. We learned about different ideas to get this small town to be more self sufficient which will help ouor community in the long run. Banding together on political issues is good too. This way if something like a lead ammo ban was being proposed in the area the groups could get together and present a calm, united front to keep this from happening.

If something bad were to happen it would be good to have these communities for trade partners or help with disasters. If one community experiences a flood or another experiences a drought, the good standing communities could help out the other ones. Information is very important to most people. Imagine if a person couldn't, read, watch or listen to the news. Here information could be exchanged.

It's good that you have found another community that is similar to yours. Sometimes just knowing there are others out there can give people the strength to get their own community started.

BLT
 
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