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Ελευθερί&#
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been checking out the boards now for about a month, I have been trying to chip in when I can but unfortunately I can sometimes only provide the point of view of the untrained :eek:: I believe a concise background will help put you guys in my shoes. I am 25 years old, hold a bachelor degree in Political Science and am in grad school for accounting. Growing up my parents turned my focus to school and athletics. I spent every offseason training for baseball and football, so needless to say I wasn't out with my buddies opening day bagging deer or out on the boat reeling in fish. Honestly, I have no survival skills outside of physical attributes. Firstly, I know I am young but I am not interested in tacticool stuff here, I more or less want some info and tips how to overcome some of the very basic anxieties and gaining the skills to become more attuned with the "wild" outdoorsman side of the human being. I have never spent a night outdoors save maybe one night backyard camping. So suffice to say while embarrassing I have to be honest, I have some anxiety about being out in the dark woods by myself especially.

My old man is a former marine and owns about 15 to 20 acres nearby, I can train and camp there and he can help out when he has time. I have seen various threads outlining a few skills and I have done google searches but I would like to hear are if any of you out there started from scratch at an older age faced anxieties and fears being in the deep dark woods. For those who had the experiences when they were still young your input would be helpful as well. Also if any of you have some good literature that you have read pass it on!
 

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The only survival skill people are born with is knowing how to breathe-and even that requires a good slap on the rear on occasion. A good pistol and a sharp knife and a campfire will help allay and fears of the deep dark woods. Take friends! Hang here and learn all you can.
 

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Cats care too - Prepare!
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Hello and Welcome from Grayling, Michigan. :) Don't worry so much about how much you think you don't have or don't know, just be happy you are on the way, learning and preparing. There is a ton of great information available on this site, so happy reading and learning! Enjoy. :)
 

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Your dad should be able to teach you a lot. I grew up hunting an fishing an was a Infantry soldier in the US army. There will always be more to learn but I would recommend two books the SAS survival hand Book or it's revised edition, and Long-Term Survival In The Coming Dark Age: Preparing to Live after Society Crumbles. Always remember your Knowledge an skill are your best tools.
 

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reluctant sinner
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It a lot easier to learn to gut a grouse than an elk. Feeling the difference between a nibble and just bouncing down the bottom is an acquired skill. Get out and do it will teach faster than tons of reading and video watching. Being an accomplished outdoorsman is attained by being outdoors. Short trips overnight in good weather is a safe start. As your skills and confidence grow so does the duration of the trip.

There are many ways to skin a cat, some better than others but the way that works best for you might not be in a book (none approved by cats, and its just a metaphor anyway).
 

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Bad Moon Rising
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Here is one place to start:

Get one of the books by Colin Fletcher on backpacking. Latest version is IV --

http://www.amazon.com/The-Complete-Walker-Colin-Fletcher/dp/0375703233/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1389242737&sr=8-1&keywords=fletcher+complete+walker

Michigan is an awesome place to get started because there are lots of trails and places to hike there, although many of the better ones are in the Upper Penninsula (IMHO).

But I digress. Read Fletcher's book for a good primer, and then just get started.

Start with weekend hikes, out Friday night back Sunday morning. Keep notes on what works and what doesn't. Head out once per month at least, twice if you can. After one season you'll have a good handle on what works for you, but keep going in the colder and wetter months as well, as long as you can - even short trips are worthwhile.

Learning how to move carrying a load, what to carry, (what NOT to carry) and how to use the basic gear is most of the challenge. Learning what you like to eat, how much of it to carry, etc. is part of that as well. It will all come together, but the only way to really integrate all the pieces is to just get out there and do it.

If you can find a friend and go hunting for deer as well, that's another bit of it. By that I mean learning to go hunting adds other skills and requirements beyond simply moving through wilderness terrain. The only way to learn about being in the outdoors is to spend a lot of time in the outdoors. No better time to begin than right now.

Best with it.

And welcome to the forums.
 

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Ελευθερί&#
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the tips so far, I most certainly plan on spending as much time as I can outside. I am trying to convince a couple of my old college buddies to take a week trip up to the UP for camping and some navigation. I am looking forward to learning new skills and I always enjoy being outside so that isn't an issue!
 

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If I had a voice I'd sing
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I feel uncomfortable about going outside in the deep dark woods myself! LOL around here there are grizzly bears, mountain lions and 150lb wolves!

And in every deep dark woods there may be 2 legged predators to worry about...

Anyway...

You asked for literature and here is my recommendation: "The Big Sky" by A. B. Guthrie, Jr.

You didn't specify genre! And that is the book that inspired me to move to Montana and carry on my life here. I guess you might say that it changed my life.

PS: don't think that because you haven't been a 'prepper' or been on this board for awhile means that you can't help someone out if they have a question that need's to be answered.
 

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Have lots of ink and paper and do a lot of printing and searching.and reading.and training.
Welcome to the boards .
 

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Hypothermia, starvation, injury...those are all threats that you should fear. "Deep dark woods" is not a threat, it is just a location. So the first step of your journey is to overcome the mental obstacles and unjustified fears that you have about surviving in the wild.
 

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I recommend Pathfinders E-Course. You will learn beginning and intermediate skills. This curriculum is designed around your own specific habitat and schedule. The schedule aspect, work at your own pace, is ideally conducive to a college student. @$70.00 per course, this too is student friendly.
 

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Hello and welcome from Israel.

You just have to start.. start from simple hiking and try to spot and remember spots that could be good for a camp.

Get used to your area and terrain.. get used to the weather outside, the winds, rains, sun etc..

Get a basic gear you need to.. all the rest is building up.

The learning curve is mostly packing huge and heavy backpack of needless items that you thought might be a good idea to carry.. carry it for 10-20miles and camp a few times, after that you probably do your thinking and prioritizing of gear.

Learn to start a decent fire, use your knife, build your shelter (even tents require some practice).

Learn about the wild life and edible plants in your area.. give it a try..
Stay a few nights alone in the outdoors to overcome your fear... there are more danger in the city than in the dark woods.


Basic gear I think one must invest in:

-Good pair of hiking shoes and 2-3 pairs of good socks
-Clothing that fit your weather (doesn't have to be hi-tec or fancy but it must be good for your area)
-Good backpack (will save you a lot of hurt later.. trust me)
-a reasonable knife (MORA if you ask me)

The rest you will figure ;)

Good luck and stay safe
 

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I had some great outdoors experiences of fishing and camping with my grandparents during the summer when I was growing up. Outside of that, the occasional walk in local parks. It wasn't anything I was interested in in high school or college, but the outdoors bug really hit me in my middle 20s.

You don't have anything to be embarrassed about. Everyone starts somewhere, and not all of us had someone guiding us, or maybe it wasn't something we were interested in growing up. The cool thing is you're interested in it now.

My advice is to start out slowly. Do some car camping first where you can just practice at getting good at the basic things like setting up/taking down camp, starting a fire, dealing with the weather, food prep, and going for some day hikes. Read multiple forums where you can get a lot of information from more than just one source.
 

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Greetings from New Zealand! 20 Odd acres to run riot in and a Dad who's a marine? You are ahead of the game right there! Don't worry about your fears, I never sleep very well the 1st couple of nights either, it's just your body remembering it's a hunter/gatherer.

Give some thought to not going armed initally if local wildlife/bad hats permits, there is nothing like being well down the food chain to force you to actually THINK about your situation. Your sole advantage over everything else that runs, swims, crawls or flies is that squishy stuff between your ears.
 

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Learning how to make fire from scratch was very empowering for me. That and always having a good knife is about all I need to feel reasonably safe in the deep woods. Although things that go bang make me feel a hell of a lot better lol. Obviously you should pack a little heavier than that for your first couple of nights. In time you will learn what you need and what can be left behind.

Also make sure you have access to water. I usually can't walk 3 miles in any direction with out being knee deep in fresh water so I take it for granted sometimes.
 

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I'M READY!!
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You could always join a fish and game club. Usually if youre honest about your abilities and intentions and then volunteer your time to help out with events/cleaning/maintenance/etc there will be more then enough folks willing to show you the ropes :thumb:
 

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The Rule of 3's is a good one to learn especially when you're first starting out.
The average person can survive approximately
3 minutes without oxygen
3 hours without shelter in extreme weather conditions. In extreme cold add insulation and fire to that.
3 days without water
3 weeks without food.
Now of course all that can be subjective depending on your own fitness level and how much moving around or traveling you are doing. If you are walking up and down mountains then you are going to need a lot of food long before 3 weeks is up. If you are just sitting in one place and not doing very much then you can probably survive the 3 weeks without food. The average search and rescue situation lasts about 72 hours until complete.
You should also read the thread "ATTENTION NOOBS! SKILLS YOU NEED!"

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=328000
 

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Just like so many others on here pointed out. Start small then as time, finances, and work allows, expand your experiences. No need to totally "commando" but do approach it using some common sense. I.e avoid winter camping if you haven't learned how to start a fire. Most of all, have fun.
 
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