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Looking at buying a Husqvarna chainsaw this week. Was talking to a couple of guys at work about chainsaws when one of them started talking about echo chainsaws.

I tried not to be rude, his intentions were good, but isn't Echo one of those generic chainsaws? If I remember right there is a sign in the Stihl shop showing the "rainbow" brands of chainsaws. These are the saws made for various companies that have their own color and name. The saws are not made "by" the company, they are made "for" the company.

Craftsman
Echo
Poulan
Homelite,,,, various others, aren't they made by just a couple of companies while Stihl and Husqvarna are made at their own factories?

After hurricane Rita my uncle bought a poulan chainsaw. When working side by side the poulan just could not hang with the Stihl.

When it comes down to it, aren't a lot of those consumer grade chainsaws the same? That is why loggers use stihl and Husqvarna.
 

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My best friend bought an Echo to use as a limb saw. It's a POS. He wishes every time he uses it that he'd bought a little Stihl.

It is very hard to start and takes forever to warm up. It's been that way from day one
 

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I have an Echo, 2 Poulans, and an old Homelite. My Echo starts easily, and warms up quickly. It's a little low on power with a 16" bar, and chain,but powers right through with a 14". The 16" Poulan is also low on power, but the 14" gets through the job just fine. The old Homelite is a Timex, 25 yrs old, and just won't quit.

Stihls are great saws, but either weigh more, are more unweildy to me. I don't have any experience with Husqies, but see a lot of them in the area. I inherited the Homelite, and Poulans. They all work okay, and start fine, and run fine.

I drain the fuel, and bar oil out of my saws if they're going to be setting for more than a couple of days, and clean the chain drive areas often. They might not be the best saws out there, but I'm getting good service out of them so far. Since the saws use so little fuel compared to other devices I do the mix with premium gas. That seems to help keep them going. My only problem is I have to have three different cans with three different mixes.
 

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According to google, Poulon and Johnsonred are both made by Husqvarna and the Craftsman brand is a slightly modified Poulon also made by Husqvarna.
 

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My 455 Ranchers hold up for many ,many years of cutting 40 to 50 cords a year, I have had friends come over to get some wood and they break down on the first couple of days. I would never use anything other the a Husky, Stihl, or another one who you would not thin of is Makita, I got one 3 or 4 years ago. Its heavier then the others but it has like 1/2 again more power then the 455 Rancher. REally well built machine. But they are pricy
 

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Echo chainsaws generally offer great value for money. I have to admit the dozen or so I have owned have been smaller top handled saws, one of which I use most days. (I also have hedge trimmers, power pruners and backpack blowers of there making) They are made in japan and not generic copies from what I have had. (More recently shindaiwa and echo have merged so there is some cross over between models) but the quality of both brands has always been pretty good.

They have great warranties although I have never had to call them on it. A buddy has a 25 year old echo felling saw that although it weigh a lot, still cuts beautifully. The echos are a bit like the kubota of the chainsaw world, not take to seriously at first but now chewing up the market behind the "big" guys

Im going to buy another couple soon, simply because they cost about 40% less than their stihl equivalent in some cases but offer the same levels of performance, reliability and longevity.(in some cases, better)

My company runs about 20 huskys, 20 stihls, and a few echos. I do 99% of my own servicing and repairs. I have happily run jonsereds (which are bascially huskys) and dolmars to, I would keep none of them if they were not up to the job.
 

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I wouldn't have either one of them. They are both just a step above a piece of junk. And Stihls aren't much better, the old Stihls are great, but man, did they go downhill.

Trust me, if you can buy it at Home Depot, Lowes, or Walmart, it isn't worth buying.

If you want something that is going to last, this is the top three.
1. Dolmar
2. Makita (made by dolmar)
3. Tanaka
 

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I wouldn't have either one of them. They are both just a step above a piece of junk. And Stihls aren't much better, the old Stihls are great, but man, did they go downhill.

Trust me, if you can buy it at Home Depot, Lowes, or Walmart, it isn't worth buying.

If you want something that is going to last, this is the top three.
1. Dolmar
2. Makita (made by dolmar)
3. Tanaka
Tanaka make only 4 saws, all under 51cc's and there range is only getting smaller as they fail to put out good enough saws for people to want. Parts are getting harder to get and dealers are staying clear of them. They used to be comparitable in quality, range,design and price to echos but all have slipped somewhat.

Dolmars are good saws, I have owned and run them myself but 9 of the 19 saws makita/dolmar make are the same saw with a different top end, which in some instances leaves you with a heavy saw for its hp output.

I have made my living and provided for my family mainly with huskys, stihls and echos. If your calling the echos, huskys a step above a piece of junk, whats your experience with these saws?

Its true some of there lower grade models are sold through big box stores, but its not reason to write off everything they make.
 

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Consumer Reports Chainsaw

Husqvarna 445 top rated heavy duty

Stihl MS 180 C-BE & Craftsman 34190 top rated lighter duty
 

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Here's a couple questions that need to be answered
1. What is your intended use for this saw?
2. what is your price range?
3. how often will this saw be used ie daily, weekly, monthly ?
 

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Tanaka make only 4 saws, all under 51cc's and there range is only getting smaller as they fail to put out good enough saws for people to want. Parts are getting harder to get and dealers are staying clear of them. They used to be comparitable in quality, range,design and price to echos but all have slipped somewhat.

Dolmars are good saws, I have owned and run them myself but 9 of the 19 saws makita/dolmar make are the same saw with a different top end, which in some instances leaves you with a heavy saw for its hp output.

I have made my living and provided for my family mainly with huskys, stihls and echos. If your calling the echos, huskys a step above a piece of junk, whats your experience with these saws?

Its true some of there lower grade models are sold through big box stores, but its not reason to write off everything they make.
I might have been a little overboard calling them junk, but the fact is, they don't last very long. I have never had a Stihl, Husky, or Echo last longer than two years the way I use them, which is year round, all the time, in very bad conditions. For example, I used to take my boat up small creeks and have to get out every hundred or so yards to cut away fallen trees, waist deep in water. All winter long, I would cut wood very regularly, at least twice a week.

The Dolmar/Makita is the only saw I have ever owned that I had no problems with...the oiler never went out, it always started, it never had any problems like vacuum lines coming off and making it run erratically, etc. I still have it, it runs as good as when I got it ten years ago.

One major problem with a lot of saws, or any small engine for that matter, is that the smaller the engine, the more trouble you have. I don't know why, it just is. I had nothing but trouble with an arborist top handle echo but really had little or no problems with a really big echo. The same goes for weedeaters and the like...you get a tiny one---expect trouble.
 

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One brand of saw that goes unmentioned and unappreciated is the old McCullochs. I had a McCulloch that lasted me for a very long time and it was used when I got it. I never had any problems with it at all. This was in the mid-90's, I don't know anything about the new ones. There are certain things I just do NOT buy from Lowe's and Home Depot, and chainsaws are at the top of that list.
 

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Echo gives you a 5 year consumer warranty -- the other brands will not get close to that. Why, if their saws are so superior? :confused:

Whatever brand you buy, if you use it for more than just an occasional pruning, buy a "pro-level" saw. It matters little where you buy it except maybe a local dealer will give you better service on a saw you buy there.

I bought a pro-level Echo 3 years ago, not a minute's trouble with it, I love it. Before that, I had a ~ 30 year old McCulloch pro-level saw that ran and ran and ran.

Dad bought a small Stihl that was a piece of junk -- 2 shop visits in the first 2 years and hard to start.
 

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I have a `99 vintage Husky and a `75 vintage Homelite. The Homelite still runs and performs well but so does the Husky. The Husky starts easier, is vibration dampened and is better balanced. The Husky is a better saw to work with. JMHO
 

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Looking at buying a Husqvarna chainsaw this week. Was talking to a couple of guys at work about chainsaws when one of them started talking about echo chainsaws.

I tried not to be rude, his intentions were good, but isn't Echo one of those generic chainsaws? If I remember right there is a sign in the Stihl shop showing the "rainbow" brands of chainsaws. These are the saws made for various companies that have their own color and name. The saws are not made "by" the company, they are made "for" the company.

Craftsman
Echo
Poulan
Homelite,,,, various others, aren't they made by just a couple of companies while Stihl and Husqvarna are made at their own factories?

After hurricane Rita my uncle bought a poulan chainsaw. When working side by side the poulan just could not hang with the Stihl.

When it comes down to it, aren't a lot of those consumer grade chainsaws the same? That is why loggers use stihl and Husqvarna.
keep in mind the pro models are different from the consumer models. I bought a consumer model and it was fine, but for a few dollars more I could have gotten a pro version.
 

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Echo gives you a 5 year consumer warranty -- the other brands will not get close to that. Why, if their saws are so superior? :confused:

Whatever brand you buy, if you use it for more than just an occasional pruning, buy a "pro-level" saw. It matters little where you buy it except maybe a local dealer will give you better service on a saw you buy there.

I bought a pro-level Echo 3 years ago, not a minute's trouble with it, I love it. Before that, I had a ~ 30 year old McCulloch pro-level saw that ran and ran and ran.

Dad bought a small Stihl that was a piece of junk -- 2 shop visits in the first 2 years and hard to start.
Those warranties don't mean anything. It reminds me of the Chris Farley movie where he was talking about finding out how good the meat was by sticking your head up a bulls ass. "But wouldn't you rather ask the butcher?"
 

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When I was felling and bucking trees for a living it was Poulsan for the most part. One of the guys had a husky. The argument is similar to Harley vs everything else. Which is better? It depends. If I were out somewhere I had to depend on my chainsaw I want to be able to pretty much rebuild it on the tailgate of my pickup. I would want to be able to get a steady supply of parts quickly and easily.
If you occasionally need a chainsaw, then one of the big box store saws is fine.
 

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Which bag? No way I'm carrying all this stuff, that's why I turned my F150 into a bugout truck.
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I have a `99 vintage Husky and a `75 vintage Homelite. The Homelite still runs and performs well but so does the Husky. The Husky starts easier, is vibration dampened and is better balanced. The Husky is a better saw to work with. JMHO
1999 vintage Husky. LOL

Bought mine in 1989. Used it for 2 years straight as a logger/faller. Continued using it for firewood cutting (sold firewood as a side business, averaged 3 cords a week). Gave it to my father when i left for the Navy and it still gets used once in awhile. When I was back in Northern Wisconsin last fall I went over and got it to cut some trees, it fired up on the 5th pull and ran like a champ. Draining the gas if it will be sitting for awhile is key. That husky has a lot of miles and hard use.

Comparing a Husky with an Echo is like comparing a Ford F350 with a Nissan B2000.
 
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