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One decade later...
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221 Posts
If you carry the gun, it would be very helpful, but as a home defense if you

already know the person is in the house.. it wouldn't do a lot if you are ready.
 

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tinfoil bandana
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1,164 Posts
Whoever shoots first, accurately, wins.

That being said, if the BG already has his gun trained on you, any motion is likely to put you in a world of hurt.

Best advice I heard so far is from a local gun shop concerning concealed carry:

Keep the gun in a pocket, with your hand covering it- you can shoot through clothing if necessary
 

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I feel good.... . . .
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494 Posts
I guess it would depend on what kind excrement is hitting the fan. If I had to make a general statement or blanket statement based on the 1-10 scale with 1 being not very important and 10 being very important I would give it about a 6. If I met three shady characters in my living room that were not invited into my home and were also brandishing arms, then I would rate this at 10. This ability would be nice to have in your 'tool box' of tactical skills but by no means be the only trick up your sleeve. Good question, kinda hard to answer.

What do you think?
 

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1,270 Posts
Quick draw is good, but not as important as situational awareness. I posted a thread on Target Engagement Sequence. This Sequence is what you want to be fast at, and accurate. Also remember that getting off the X and creating distance while you draw, is better than just standing their and drawing in the old west style.
 

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Destroyer of Ignorance
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Check this out.

 

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I went to the range yesterday to "practize" drawing my pistol from a concealed holster and hit a mansized target 20 feet away. Let me tell you that if you do not get some time in drawing from your concealment holster and in clothing you will be wearing the "fog of war" will jump on you and you will discover how lucky you are that that target will not shoot back!
I was shooting a DA revolver and just for starters I fired my first two shots fast but I would not say it was quick by no means.Firing DA the first two shots one went low the other just grazed the target pattern,well if that had been real the perps clothes would have had a real bad day.....
Ok now lets rethunk dis. Next I started slow and steady thinking and counting the whole time 1..reach and pull up the shirt.2...holding the shirt up with one hand grasp the pistol with the other.3...pull the pistol out of the holster.4...finger off the trigger untill the sights are on the target.(It hurts when you shoot yerself in the foot or leg not counting the embarassment of the perp laughing at you) 5...as the gun is coming up to the target pull back the hammer for a single action shot.(If you have this option)
6...eyes on front sight and line up with target.7...maintain even pressure on pistol and squeeze the trigger and wadjaknow a hit in the center of mass.
 

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I hate to buck the trend, but I would guess that most shooting is going to be ambush style. Shooting people that don't know they are in a gun fight (armed or not) until the first round is fired.

I don't see people standing toe to toe, talking smack until a draw happening very often at all.

I see more sniping (even if just from a few feet away) and then robbing the dead. Or just avoiding people all together.
 

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Anyone who carries a gun from a concealed position or otherwise, should be able to draw it and fire accurately quickly. Smooth is fast. Don't rush the practice, get all the points down and let speed come naturally.
 

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American fearmaker
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14,245 Posts
Being an experienced sniper, no amount of quick drawing would work right when I engage a target from say 200 yards with a scoped rifle.

Rule # 1. If you're really good at something, don't expect the other guy to allow you to prove it.

Rule # 2. If things are going right as planned, you've probably walked into an ambush kill zone.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
For you herd sniper 'quick sniping' then, 3 cans at 200 yards in under a second from the rifle being at your waist from the start. If you could or can do that how important is that ability?
 

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American fearmaker
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For you herd sniper 'quick sniping' then, 3 cans at 200 yards in under a second from the rifle being at your waist from the start. If you could or can do that how important is that ability?

Rule # 3. Don't expect ME to do things by YOUR standard.

One shot, one kill. It is as simple as that. Accuracy always renders speed useless. Think of the movie where Paul Newman was Judge Roy Bean. A drunken fast draw killer showed up at Bean's tavern only to die in an ambush. It didn't matter how fast a draw that killer was he still ended up dead.

When John Wesley Hardin was killed the sheriff who killed him claimed to have shot Hardin under the left eye. Others claim that the sheriff shot Hardin from behind and in the back of the head. One sage was heard to say, "If the sheriff shot Hardin under the eye that was good marksmanship. If the sheriff shot Hardin in the back of the head then that was good tactics." So, fast draw pistolero versus long range, accurate rifleman... I'm gonna bet on the rifleman every time.
 

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Unless you are Clint Eastwood... :)


But seriously - I think most "killings" are/were ambushes, bush-whacks and back-shooting. Tom Horn preferred using a rifle and distance to his advantage. Pat Garrett ambushed Billy the Kid, like Billy the Kid ambushed several of his victims. Wild Bill Hickock shot Dave Tutt at 75 yards, then got it in the back when he was done in; as did Jesse James.

Remember the rules of gunfighting: if you find yourself in a fair fight, you've done something wrong.
 

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Information is Ammunition
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22,122 Posts
the important thing is to program your muscle memory so that you react to a threat without needing to think about it.

The closest I ever came to a shoot, from my point of view, time dilated as my brain put me in fight or flight mode, and I drew down on the threat, but I don't remember how my gun actually got into my hand. it was just there.

I got to where I could do that from endless dry practice at home. Those of you with CCLs need to practice even more because its more complex action to draw from concealment
 
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