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Last of the First Line
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I think - actually, I know - I should tell my family that they need to wise up and get to some basic level of preparedness.

If you had to do this, how did you get your family members (or even friends) to wake up and smell the coffee?

My brother is coming around - cause I got him to read FerFal's lengthy posts about his experiences in Argentina. He even stopped looking at me like I was some kind of gun nut, like he did when I said I wanted an M1911. (I'm in a left-wing-dominated urban environment in Canada, where guns are capital b-a-d).

I know this tactic won't work as well on my mother, father, or sister - so, on behalf of them, and their future well-being, could you please share some pointers?
 

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Looking ahead
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There are some other threads like this but we could always use another.

Stuff that has worked for myself and others. Watching the news specials about hurricane Katrina really opened my wifes eyes. These true scenarios are endless. Just open the newspaper or watch the news with your family and make some remarks like "I can't believe that happened." "What would we do if that happened to us?" and "I don't want you or the kids to ever end up in a situation like that, we should do something." Slowly your family will become more aware and prepared. Your family may even take the lead on this.

Then theres the buy in bulk approach. There are pros and cons to this (I don't like the cons). The ideal is to slowly get the home ready for a disaster like a food shortage by buying in bulk. Officially its to save money and lessen unnecessary trips to the store. Who doesn't hate to have to run out for that item you thought you had but didn't.

The cons to this approach is that your not being totally honest about why you want the house stocked to the roof with canned goods and TP so your family isn't really on board but rather along for the ride. The biggest con to this method is that if they don't know its not supposed to be kept under wraps then your wife or kids may blab about how much such and such they have to spare or even show a neighbor your overstocked pantry.
 
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straight talk

Preparedness is difficult to sell to someone that does not believe bad things can happen. We have been living in a time of plenty and relative stability for about 60 years in the US/Canada. It's a Paradigm problem for most, they only know what they have personally experienced. If they have never seen a flood or wild fire they are not interested in the insurance, something like that. They will have to believe that bad things could really happen before they will believe it is worthwhile to prepare to avoid that outcome.

I would recommend you start slow, sell the idea of self sufficiency over being more dependent, let that soak in. Lead others to the topic, what can we do to avoid this outcome, etc. However, I don't believe you have a very long period to get them on board, hope I am wrong. Avoid using the word survivalist, wearing camo and gun talk. Don't force your ideas on the others, let them come logically to the same conclusion you have on their own.

This is a pretty harsh experiment, shock therapy, is just an example. How about reminding them of the winter ice storms that have knocked down parts of the Canadian electric grid for days and weeks at a time, its a real threat, winter is coming. Tell them you are going to run an experiment, flip off the houses main electrical circuit breaker. Next sit back and ask how will we cope if this is the way we have to live for a week. If they take it seriously, see their dependency is that great, there will be more interest in flashlights, batteries etc. You can think of your own scenario, but something like the power down scenario is pretty convincing such that most people will want to avoid the inconvenience. Good luck.
 

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When I sat down with my wife and had " the talk" about this a little over six months ago I was very concerned it would be an uphill battle but thankfully she not only got it... she got into it and has become a full-fledged partner and participant in our preparations every day.

The thing is I didn't get into full-blown scenarios of TEOTWAWKI etc.. I just said we need to have reserves of the three B's and keep an eye on the economy / elections. Most people can't fathom full-scale social disorder so you have to ease them into it softly. I used words like preparedness not survival otherwise the concept is too big and unbelievable to start.

As I talk to others, friends/family/acquaintances I test the waters a bit philosophically and see where they are leaning and frankly what their level of awareness is of the current events. Come to find out my next door neighbors were well ahead of us in firearms prep but had not even started yet with food and back up power. They helped inspired us to move forward and we helped them move forward each by example. My other next door neighbor...well... he's up to his ears in debt with two luxury car payments over $1600 EACH and two babies under two years old. A few months ago the Feds stepped in and shut down the bank he was a VP at. He still doesn't get it. My guess is if TSHTF he'll be sharing some of that water in his pool in-trade for use of my genny to run his latte espresso maker!

My point is you have to start easy and not come on too strong or hard for fear of making it sound too way out. Hopefully they'll ask a few questions and you can at least get them thinking. If not, well... you can't push a rope and if they're family you'd better add a few extras B's cause they'll be knocking on your door if TSHTF and they didn't get it.
 

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Tried searching posts for this, but couldn't find anything...

I think - actually, I know - I should tell my family that they need to wise up and get to some basic level of preparedness.

If you had to do this, how did you get your family members (or even friends) to wake up and smell the coffee?

My brother is coming around - cause I got him to read FerFal's lengthy posts about his experiences in Argentina. He even stopped looking at me like I was some kind of gun nut, like he did when I said I wanted an M1911. (I'm in a left-wing-dominated urban environment in Canada, where guns are capital b-a-d).

I know this tactic won't work as well on my mother, father, or sister - so, on behalf of them, and their future well-being, could you please share some pointers?
People at work are finally starting to talk about the economy and that things are going to get very bad. One person is saying that it this is nothing compared to what is to come. My daughter in law said her family is talking about this and about the 20000 troops to come to the US among countless other things. Many are still living the comfort zone. As for me, I am going to start stocking up on some food cause my job is in a shaky zone right now and I hear it can take up to 4 months for unemployment checks to start coming in.
 

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i have the same issue just last night my brother was telling me about the 3 tornados that came thru arkansas 1st he was at work destroyed his job killed a friend and others.2nd was under new bosses house tree falls on houseduring that one 3rd on 4th floor hospital when it hit then his girlfriend proceeds to say how their paper had a story about emergency prepareness since they had so many tornados this year and how stupid it was so how would you convince theese people after going thru this and thinking being prepared is stupid.
 

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Looking ahead
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...his girlfriend proceeds to say how their paper had a story about emergency prepareness since they had so many tornados this year and how stupid it was so how would you convince theese people after going thru this and thinking being prepared is stupid.
I'm not sure what the newspaper said but I have read some real boneheaded stories and "preparedness" brochures. Maybe she was referring to the methods of preparedness the story suggested when she said it was stupid or maybe she just didn't understand the reason why certain measures need to be taken.

These things are going to take time. Be patient, prepared to explain why things should be done and use some finesse so you don't come off as some crazy EOTW doomsayer. Some people do not even realize that there is no back storage area for merchandise in stores anymore. Thanks to the "Just In Time" system what you see on the shelves is what you have. Then after slowly explaining how something like a major gas shortage affects your grocery store shelves in a matter of less than 3 days does it sink in (hopefully). Good luck
 

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Just ask them what they think about what is happening with the economy and world in general... their responses should tell you whether or not they are going to listen to prepardness ideas.

Example:

What do you think of the economy?

"It will all boil over, once the government passes that bail out bill we'll be back on the upswing!"

Not ready!!

"I'm pretty concerned, it looks like things are getting nasty and I'm not sure what to do"

Possibly ready!!

"Time to get the beans, band aids, bullets, and build the bomb shelter!"

Definetely ready!!

Hope this helps :D:
 

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I really don't tell my family to get prepared. They live their life the way they want, I live mine the way I want. They have enough set aside for a month and that's good with them.

To me survivalism or being prepared is either in the blood or it isn't. Most people who identify themselves as survivalist started doing little things even as children. They learned one or two wild edibles in their area. They learned how to spear frogs or trap gophers. They liked helping in the garden or watching when grandma canned her food. When they bought their first car they always made sure to have a sleeping bag or blankets in the trunk. When they moved out on their own they began storing water or other things that were cheap to have. They may not even know why they're doing it, but they just feel better when they are self sufficient and they start young trying to be that way.

There are people who, in blind moments of fear, stock up a few things, but these aren't really survivors. In 6 months to maybe a year they forget all about surviving and either threw away or gave away all that darn survival junk that just keeps getting in the way. They read a book but never get out and try anything new. They eat their stored food and don't replace it. A person can only be scared for so long before they just stop. Real survivalist aren't doing this because they're scared. They're doing this because it is who they are.

My family thinks I'm odd because I wanted to live a simple, get back to basics life. I think they're odd for needing other people's approval for everything. What the latest fashion is, my yard has to look perfectly green, my car needs to be the 'in' car, it would drive me nuts trying to do that. It would drive them nuts tripping over all that food that they didn't need right now or mowing around the hand pump that was there just in case the power went off. I'd rather be hiking, they'd rather be clubbing. Each is a different way of living and I've learned not to tell others how to live their life.

If my family or anyone for that matter expresses interest in what I do, I'm not embarrassed to tell them. If they think I'm crazy, well what stick do they measure sanity with? I think everyone is at least a little crazy. So I'll talk with them. If a person's survival plan is downing a couple quarts of Jack if something bad happens, who am I to say they are wrong? If someone is willing to live in government camps to survive, who am I to say they are wrong?

Maybe I'm going about this all for nothing, but it's the way I live my life, I'm happy, and I'm not hurting anyone. If they can say the same, then more power to their choices. So I let them live their life and I live mine.

BLT
 

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I'm pretty much alone in my family in preparing. My husband has no interest in it, no thought towards the future. He truly just lives in the present, ticks me off to no end. He needs to be in the midst of an emergency, then he will definitely come through, but I am the type who needs to be organized and prepared. the kids are getting older, I'll probably start getting them into my preparations- they think all my gear is for next years camping trip, and that's that. Food comes from the supermarket, and mom gets it- heaven forbid we try to put the effort into growing our own. My fault, they've had it too easy.

My parents have a small stockpile of food, but it's just so there's less trips to the market. I'm pretty sure my sister and her family do nothing to prepare for an emerergency, and they live on the water- their house floods at least once a year. My brother and his family do not prepare.

I've started talking to girlfriends about what I'm doing and why- the same girlfriends who come camping with me every year and are "into that kind of stuff." they think it's just a new hobby of mine, but hey, whatever it takes to get them moving.
 

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To secure peace is to...
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I think some people are open to hearing you, but the vast majority of people fall into this quote as a second or third generation:

"Men fight for liberty and win it with hard knocks. Their children, brought up easy, let it slip away again, poor fools. And their grand-children are once more slaves." -- D. H. Lawrence

Most people are either born/raised with it, or they aren't. You just can't beat the stupid out of some people. People are unaware or forget history and no matter how much you tell them of the fifty scenarios that may happen, they just won't buy it. They were "brought up easy."

Good luck though, I feel your pains...
 

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the what if game

In the beginning it is easier to sell "practical preparations", things that will benefit you and family regardless of what happens (good or bad), pick no risk items. Food is a good example, you will be glad to have extra food if a disaster strikes, yet if nothing happens you will still have to eat, and will have saved maybe 20 percent by buying it now rather than next year after the price goes up. Stocking up on items allows you to buy when the item is on sale rather than being forced to buy at premium price because your out. Pick a few preparation areas that are non-controversial in the beginning, before getting to the harder to sell items.

Once you spouse can see that your preparation ideas make sense, they, may be more receptive to getting involved. At least they will probably back off and let you prep.

I recommend playing the "what if game" with your spouse and family, think of scenarios and let them tell how they would handle the situation. The mental exercise will open (yours and their) minds to how to think through a situation and develop the survivalist mindset. I would start with your spouse, then the rest of your immediate family first. Remember that people will act, or at least think about preparations, only if they think it could happen to them. Talking through an imaginary disaster communication scenario is a good starting point. Like, what if there was a tornado, the school closes and kids need to be picked up, parents are at work, who does what. Throw in problems, example, "what if the cell phones don't work, etc.", so your kids learn to be flexible and adaptive. Guide the game, make occasional suggestions, but allow the others to work it out, be patient. This sort of activity is a good way to get a spouse involved, then branch out to cover the scenarios that really worry you.
 

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I am lucky in that my mother is in her late 80's and remembers the stories and some of the effects of the Great Depression. Most of her relatives rode it out by being farmers. She had a stroke recently and has just now begun to walk again. My father on the other hand had it worse and it drove him to be successful and run his own business.
She ended up with enough money thanks to dads foresight, for us to purchase 20 acres of decent land.I just talked with her yesterday about doing so and she is asking me how soon I can get things done. I am also lucky to have a Sister & Bro in law that raise horses and a Sister in law & Bro in law on my wife's side that raise goats chickens and a few head of cattle. I am starting this coming weekend to look for property and get things set for the coming Depression. I a decent gardener and my wife grew up raising domestic animals. SO here we go getting all domestic. Man have I got a lot to learn fast!
 

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Look! shiney!
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Last nights dinner conversation

I have been talking to the kids about this.
Last night we had my step-son and his new wife up for dinner, to try to bring them into the fold.

Well less than 2 min. into the conversation, the D in law says " If something happens I'll just go to my grandmothers, she has food". Then the look of "Are these people serious" comes on her face.
The wife and I just stoped talking about it, and proceded to other things.
My Step-son sounded reciptive to the thought, and said he had been thinking along these lines. We are going to talk with him privatly, and see if we can get him to start to prepare for himself and his wife, so there may be hope.

We live in interior Alaska and EVERYTHING we eat, (other than what we hunt and fish) comes to AK on a barge from Seattle, from T-bones to tolilet papar.

I just stared preparing just before the election, my wife is of the same mind as she was raised LDS, and her parents allways had a stockpile. I spent many years helping my mom can our crops, so I have bought a pressure canner and dehydrator. As soon as I can I am getting my first garden going in 20 yrs.

My wife and I have 5 kids between us and each has spouse and only 1 of them has more than a weeks supplies. We are the only ones that can heat our home if the elect. stops flowing, so I expect to see them all show up.

I just hope we have another growing season before thing get really bad, if I can keep it up at the current pace, I will have a 2 year stock by the fall.

I just wish I could get through to the kids.
 

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Lead by Example

Some of my family members have more savvy than I imagined, though to what degree I'm uncertain. I don't think a few of them will ever have a comprehensive plan nor emergencty preparedness setup. As some have noted, many people simply don't care until they experience hardship. Suddenly it becomes 'real' to them. As if incelement weather and other natural emergencies never happen. I've met too many people that have zero survival instinct. They cannot fathom anything ever not coming from an electrical outlet or from a store.
As someone remarked, you can't beat the stupid out of some. All I suggest is leading by example, and discussing options. I'm single by choice, though a woman had a lot of interest in me, I couldn't seriuosly consider settling down with someone who would on one hand worry about crime and on the other not want firearms around, not one.
I've not been to the range in years, have no need. After a few talks with current affairs, my friend has been searching through the web for deals on packs, at least. Without any prompting or suggestions from me. Apparently somewhere along the line he dexcided, hey, not a bad idea.
He's no more a 'survivalist' than I am. I 've just had experiences where life threw me a few curveballs and I was able to roll with the punches more easily because of a background in camping and backpacking, and a long-instilled sense of preparedness. You never know. Some will simply gain through osmosis, some will ever be the sheep to the slaughter. That simply being anything life throws at them and their unwillingness to accept the hard fact that life is noone's friend.
 

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Welcome to the forums Scott, from southcentral.
We have the same feelings about our kids and extended family.
Last night we had an older couple over for dinner, their more like family than just friends.
Several problems though , They live in a totally electric home, only a few scented candles for light. No heat except electric baseboard. Only backup cooking is a propane BBQ in the carport which I'll bet is out of gas.
They have been to our home many times but have never been invited down to the basement, they know we prep but have no idea of the amount of our stores.
Have talked with them about prepping, but in their minds they think there would be a place for them here. Not a realistic plan on their part.
Guess if the SHTF the gym at the high school might become a warm shelter with a soup line. Better take your own bowl and spoon......
 
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