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Scope Problems

I’m looking for people that have and fired an AK 47 to help me salve a problem that I have with mine. When using iron sights the rifle shoots on target at 100yards. I put a 3 to 9 scope on the rifle and zeroed in at a 100 yards. the rifle shoots on target at a 100 yards. I put a 4 to 20 scope and tried to zero in at 100 yards at 10 power The rounds where high 12 inch and 36 inch to the left and could not adjust the scope any more then 6 ins to left. I put on another scope 4 to 16 at 10 power tried to zero in at 100yards. with the same result. Put the 3 to 9 scope back on and the rounds are on target. Have any of you guys ever seen this problem be fore. I just don’t believe that 2 scopes can be bad with the same error
Thank you
 

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Set your target at 25 yard with your rifle in a very secure rest aiming at the bullseye, fire one shot. Now adjust your crosshairs from being centered on the bullseye to the center of the hole of your first shot fired without moving the rifle, fire a second shot and if you didnt move the rifle it will be in the bullseyes provided the scope is mounted correctly and functioning 100%. Now move to 100 yards and it should be close to point of aim= point of impact due to the fact that at 25 yards the bullet is traveling up in its arced trajectory and at 100 yards most rounds are dropping back down below the point of aim 2 shots=sighted in, then you can adjust for MPBR or however you want your rifle sighted

a caldwell leadsled works really well for this, they are easily copied with some sand bags and plywood if you dont have one
 

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You should always set your scope to mechanical zero before mounting. Heres the quick and dirty

Windage-crank knob all the way one way, now count all the clicks back the other way, move back the other way 1/2 the clicks moved. now that adjustment is in the mechanical center of its range of travel, do the same for the elevation. now your scope is mechanically zereoed and will have maximum adjustment to be able to sight them in.

You never know what somebody adjusted them to before you got them even if new, Ive seen new scopes adjusted all out of mechanical zero brand new from the factory still in the wrap
 

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Here's a good tip for bolt actions....

Bull the bolt out, look down the barrel at your target, and adjust your scope to find the same zero. Put the bolt back in, fire a round, and confirm your "bore sight". You'll just have to fine tune from there.

Saves a ton of time, and bullets.
 

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With a bolt gun or AR platform, why not just remove the bolt and sight down the barrel?

Last couple scopes I sighted with this method. Set the gun up in a stable mount and focus on a distant point. I like corners of a roof or other building part. Look down the barrel and center that point in the bore. Then bring the scope on to it. Usually only need a couple clicks to get it perfect at the range.
 

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I am new to rifles, and i couldnt understand exactly how to sight in a new scope please explain better if u can thnx.. dont mean to be rude!!

thns
apoklypse, i suggest you go to walmart or sportsmansguide.com and get a bore sighter for your rifle. There are various types, some that look like cartridges you load into the bore just like a bullet, it's a laser pointer essentially.

What I do is mount the scope on the rifle. Be sure it's put on there correctly and when you are sure it's straight make sure the cross hairs are perfectly verticle. (I'll often look thru the scope at the side of a building which is verticle and if the cross hair is perfectly verticle with the side/corner, it's close enough). Then tighten the screws down. You might want to get some of the "blue" thread lock (it's like a glue you put on the threads, don't use other glues). Thread lock will keep the screws from loosening from the rifle vibration, which would make the scope "lose zero" (lose accuracy).

then, in low light conditions, I put the bore sighter in the rifle and set the rifle on something stable. I point it at an object such as a sign or car about 25 yards away.
Be sure to note for Windage (horizontal orientation) which way you turn the knob to make the crosshair move to the left or right. ex: counterclockwise to move it left. (You would think all scopes would be the same, but I don't think they are)
Then note for elevation (vertical orientation) which direction you turn to raise and lower the crosshair. Ex: clockwise raises it.

Now, you can adjust the scope until the cross hair is on the laser.

Please consider that the laser will only get the bullet CLOSE. The laser might be off slightly, it's not perfect. So the next day I take the rifle to the range and set the rifle onto a stable platform.
Aim dead center and shoot the target at about 25 yards, in a 2 shot group. I don't think you need to waste a third shot, yet. Two shots will tell you where you are shooting.
Move the crosshairs so they are over the holes you just shot. Now move the rifle to center and shoot again. It should be very close to center. Move the crosshair over that hole, and shoot at center again. Now you should just about be dead center.
Move the target out to 50 yards and repeat. This time it should be close.
Then move to 100 yards. At this distance, you must be absolutely careful that the rifle is on a stable platform, teh slightest change can really make the rifle look like it's not zeroed, even if it's perfect. Here is an example of a shooting vice you can use. CLICK HERE

At 100 yards, a click or two of the knobs can move the crosshairs enough to move the bullet by an inch or so, so be very judicious about turning them slowly and carefully.

the first time you sight a rifle, you can plan on it taking 20 to 50 rounds. I actually went through about 80 rounds one day when I was learning and made some dumb mistakes (like I didn't use thread lock and couldn't figure out why the rifle that was almost zeroed suddenly wasn't anymore...and then I found when I ran out of ammo that the screws had come loose!)

Good luck, have fun, be patient, if I can do it, you can too.
 

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scope bore sight

I have picked up a British 303 rifle, I bought a sporterizing kit, and a scope.
I also bought a tool that looks like a bullet but sends a red light through the barrel and to the target. Then you adjust the cross hairs to the red dot. first shot fired I was 2 inches off dead center.
 

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My way to sight in a new scope for bolt action rifles. First sandbag the rifle @ 100 yrds from target, remove bolt and by looking thru barrel center on target and then adjust scope to this point, now rifle is bore sighted and should be on paper a 100 yrds.
Next fire a round at target with gun locked down as firm as possible, a gun vice is best but sometime not available. After firing first round do not move rifle from previous firing spot and adjust scope to target impact point of previous round.........
And THAT is the way to sight your rifle in,,bulls eye in 2 rounds
 

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My way to sight in a new scope for bolt action rifles. First sandbag the rifle @ 100 yrds from target, remove bolt and by looking thru barrel center on target and then adjust scope to this point, now rifle is bore sighted and should be on paper a 100 yrds.
Next fire a round at target with gun locked down as firm as possible, a gun vice is best but sometime not available. After firing first round do not move rifle from previous firing spot and adjust scope to target impact point of previous round.........this is not an expert way of adjusting in a scope, it is just the way I adjust my varmint and deer rifle scopes. The most important thing is to get the scope mounted correct and secure, this is very important.
Trailtec
I've done it practically the same way. Nice.
 

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The very first thing I do is to level the scope IN the rings. This can be done with a purpose built tool or with a small (6") shop level. If you're using QD or picatinny mount rings, I just level them on the kitchen counter and tighten the scope in the rings. It's pretty easy then to put the mounted scope/rings on the rifle.

I then sight in initially at 25 yrds to get on paper, (remember that at 25 yrds with a scope that adjusts one quarter inch @ 100 yrds, it takes 16 clicks to move the point of aim 1 inch.) Once I'm hitting center at 25 yrds, I move back to 100 yrds. The point of impact WILL change slightly. The idea that a rifle sighted at 25 yrds will be dead on at 250 yrds also is not entirely correct. Yes, the bullet rise from muzzle to 25 yrds and the drop from 25 yrds to 250 yrds is CLOSE, it's not exactly the same.

I sight 2.5 inches high at 100 yrds with my .308, and I'm almost assured of a kill shot out to 400 yrds on deer sized animals with no hold over/under. Works for me, YMMV.
 

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One other note on zeroing with optics. Make sure the sight is level in the mount before zeroing. If the top of the sight is canted to the right, for instance, if you adjust to move the impact up, it will also go right. I know a few people who have gotten frustrated when zeroing because they'd make a windage adjustment and the bullet would also move in elevation or vice versa. They make leveling kits with small bubble levels that go on the elevation knob, but you also have to consider that with many of the cheaper scopes, the reticle inside the tube is not perfectly aligned with the knobs on the outside of the tube.

If you're just looking for "minute of man" accuracy, the two-shot zero will work, but if you really want a good distance zero, it helps to know your near and far zero using a ballistics table for your specific gun and ammo combination.
 

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And THAT is the way to sight your rifle in,,bulls eye in 2 rounds
This a very good way ! It works best with two people so one can maintain the rifles position while he directs the other turning the knobs.

It keeps you from shooting all that ammo up during these lean times...
 

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Thank you sir.

to me that looks to be a hard way of zeroing your weapon.for my 308 what i do is at 25yrds zero it about 1"- 1 1/2" below center,at 100yrds it will be 1"-2" high of center this makes me zero at 200yrds and at 250 yrds it will have droped 1"-2" . which for hunting no matter if your 25yrds - 250 yrds if your aim is on you should still hit with in 2" which is fine for hunting. and i dont use near as big of a scope like that for under 300yrds. all i got is a 3x9 40mm. i do agree, you do need to let the barrel cool, i usually do 3 rnd grps
I would say the above post is spot on.
 

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First you should get your gun to be dead on at a close range say 25 yards. Hold the scope on a marked spot on your target and fire one round. Put the crosshairs on that marked spot and adjust the crosshairs so they are on where the bullet impacted holding the rifle steady. Fire another round then you should be spot on. Repeat until the bullet hits were the crosshairs are.

Next use the max point blank range method. Determine the kill region based on the animal size. 6"-8" would work for deer. Then use a program to calc the max point blank range for your gun given the ballistic coef of the bullet, muzzle velocity and kill region size. It will tell you how to sight in your gun at 100 yards. Most of the time this will be about 2" above the point of aim. The fire your gun at 100 yards and adjust the point of impact by moving the crosshairs so it is at the desired location about the point of aim.

When shooting you don't have to do any adjustment if the target is inside the max point blank range. If it is past that you just move the crosshairs above the were you would normally shoot a bit.
 

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I have a question that I can not find the answer to anywhere. When sighting in a new scope, does the gun need to be level with the target? Or is shooting uphill or downhill an acceptable way to sight in a new scope?
You should site your gun in shooting level. If you shoot up or down the effective distance is the cosine of angle or horizontal distance the bullet covers.
 

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Really good thread.. Just a slight peeve though.. Bullets don't "rise".. There isn't an arc.. The bullet comes out straight, then starts dropping..

It isn't anyone's fault for saying it.. I'd say most people think bullets rise.. it's those pesky pictures they show that draws an arc..

The reason for the perceived bullet rise and accompanying arc is due to the scope being above the parallel bore of the barrel and the necessity of adjusting for that at different distances.. Think about it and it will make sense.
 

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Was zeroing in my Primary Arms 1-6x24 scope the other day. First group was high right so I adjusted down and to the left and my shots disappeared. Couldn't get my shots back on paper and I was losing light so I packed it up and decided to try again another day. While re-boresighting the rifle back inside I noticed that when turning the turret in the direction to move up it moved the reticle down and same for left to right. (left moved right, right moved left)

Brought this up to an employee at my LGS and he said that you're supposed to move the reticle to where the impacts are. I've been shooting and using scope for quite a while and have never heard this logic before. It's always been adjust the turrets in the direction you want the bullet impact to go.

Has anyone every heard of logic like this before? Or are my turret directions just backwards?
 
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