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American fearmaker
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apoklypse12...

What distances do you plan to be shooting and what will you be shooting? In other words, will your scope and rifle be used to hunt wild animals or will you be using it for personal defense/protection? Also, what magnification is your scope and rifle caliber?

In general you start off close to the target with the scope and gradually work your way back in distance. I'd start off at 25 yards/meters and then move back to 50 yards/meters. If you zero most, not all, .223/5.56 and .308/7.62 NATO caliber rifles at 50 yards you are generally good to make silhouette shots or body size shots from zero to 350 or even 400 yards/meters. In most shooting situations, you will probably NOT be shooting out beyond 150 yards/meters at most whether it is hunting or personal defense. If you have a .270 Winchester caliber rifle, you might want to zero your scope, rifle and ammo for a distance of about 100 yards or meters because of its flatter bullet trajectory. And that is what you are doing when you zero a scope. You are matching your eyesight to the ballistics of your rifle, ammo, a known distance of zeroing and your scope of choice. Now keep in mind that when you shoot distances that are different than what you have your rifle zeroed for you will have to allow for the differences between the target and your known zero by adjusting the sight up or down either manually or by using mil-dot references in your scope. In some cases, you may have to experiment to get the proper changes down right for your rifle and ammo. Which means that you get to practice, practice and practice some more until you automatically know what you should do to hit the target with your scoped rifle.
 

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My way to sight in a new scope for bolt action rifles. First sandbag the rifle @ 100 yrds from target, remove bolt and by looking thru barrel center on target and then adjust scope to this point, now rifle is bore sighted and should be on paper a 100 yrds.
Next fire a round at target with gun locked down as firm as possible, a gun vice is best but sometime not available. After firing first round do not move rifle from previous firing spot and adjust scope to target impact point of previous round.........this is not an expert way of adjusting in a scope, it is just the way I adjust my varmint and deer rifle scopes. The most important thing is to get the scope mounted correct and secure, this is very important.
Trailtec
 

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the way i do it is to put a laser pointer in the chamber. the laser shines out of the barrel, and it makes it much easier and cheaper to sight in for me.
 

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Not to steal a thread. but I believe the best way to sight in a scope is to fire a round at the target at 20 yards. Have someone hold the gun steady with the cross hairs right on the bull. While one holds the gun here, you move the crosshairs until they are over the actual POI. Shoot again and you should be darn close....
 

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смерть н
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Hey,
Something you may want to consider is a laser bore sight tool. They run from about $40.00 to $100.00. I use one in all my weapons and it has allowed me to tighten my groups considerably. It's worth looking into.

Start Here:

http://www.opticsbestbuy.com/

Randy
 

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www.GuerillaTactical.com
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I use a laser bore sighter at 100 yards and zero the scope to the red dot. Then I shoot at the target. This method usually gets me on the paper. I make my adjustments from there depending on the MOA needed. I can sight in with about 9 shots total. I start by shooting 3 shots (3 to help develop a group) after the initial laser dial in. I make my elevation and windage adj (usually going 1 click over for each) and let the barrel cool for 20 mins. I will fire 3 more shots to see if my adjustments are correct. Depending on placement of these I can make any final adjustments followed by another cool down. Then I fire 3 more rounds to confirm zero. Once zeroed in I make a note of the dial positions on the turrets. I usually dial in on days with no wind and moderate temp. I will do this for 50 yards (usually start here) then 100 yards then 200 yards. I keep a card that has the turret positions for each distance. This helps me dial in quickly depending on the distance needed. Its best to memorize these turret positions. This is the sniper method i learned when I was younger. My partner would call in the distance, wind direction and speed. I made the adjustments and fired. He then could see the placement of the round and call out any adjustment needed.
 

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11B20 - Status Inactive
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I am new to rifles, and i couldnt understand exactly how to sight in a new scope please explain better if u can thnx.. dont mean to be rude!!

thns
If you are able to see through your iron sights it is best to line the rifle up on a spot on the wall or an object approximately 25-50m away get it locked in place and then adjust the scope till it is on. This method will get you close on paper where you will make your final corrections. Zero between 25 and 50m depending on the caliber.
 

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One shot zero

This is how I do it and it works like a hot dam: Set up your target at 25 yards. Use a target that is highly visi;);)ble and has black squares on all four corners
with a bright center bull and prominent cross hairs, down load from internet.
Tip: When mounting your target use a bubble level on your target to remove all cant from target and your rifle and scope, you also should have ensured that there is no induced cant in your scope on your rifle when you first mounted your scope. One degree or one minute of angle on the clock can throw off your point of impact at 100 yards to the right or left and the pie opens up the farther out you go.
Remove your bolt. Mount your rifle in a gun vise and secure it with bungie cords or mount your rifle on sandbags. (rifle must be secured so it does not move) Now look down the breach and line up the bore with the center of your target. Carefully line up your cross hairs with the bull by adjusting your scope. Install your bolt, lock and load and fire one round. You should be on paper. Next move your cross hairs to the point of impact of your fired round on the target while keeping your rifle centered on the bull. Keep in mind your rifle must be secured so it does not move while making these adjustments. Lock and load fire one more round, your point of impact should be dead center on the bull. Now move to 100 yards, fire a three shot group, allowing your barrel to cool down between shots. You will find that your point of impact should be anywhere from 1 to 2 inches high depending on caliber and bullet weight and powder load. Take the average spread of your bullet impact and move your cross hairs to the group center. (Go home) Clean your weapon. Go to the range the next day and fire a cold bore shot. Move your cross hairs to the point of impact if you need to. Now I like to move out to 300 yards, 400 yards and finally 500 yards. I find that with my 300 Weatherby Magnum that the bullets like to go to sleep and stabilize on the way to the target.

Cheers & Tighter Groups: Eaglesnester
 

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Great stuff. I will use when I get to teh range with my red dot.

"With a prayer in my mouth I dashed unarmed through a line of soldiers, my clothes were cut to pieces, my horse was wounded but I was not hurt, as I reached the door of my lodge my wife handed me my rifle saying - 'here's your gun...fight'" - Joseph, Nez Perce

ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ!
 

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Transplant
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I LOVE bore sights. The guy that runs my local shop will do it real quick in the store, and I've always been on paper the first shot. As long as the group is good on the first three rounds, I can usually put it within an inch of center on the next shot. When it's a $2 a shot rifle, it helps.

Using the right target is a big help, too. I use the sight in targets with the 1" grid squares, so I don't have to SWAG the adjustment. 4.5 squares = 4.5 inches = 4.5 MOA or 18 1/4 clicks in adjustment.

15 minutes of reading has saved me time and $$$ on more than one occasion.

Great posts.
 

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I have a question that I can not find the answer to anywhere. When sighting in a new scope, does the gun need to be level with the target? Or is shooting uphill or downhill an acceptable way to sight in a new scope?
 

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Hippie Rich
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Hey,
Something you may want to consider is a laser bore sight tool. They run from about $40.00 to $100.00. I use one in all my weapons and it has allowed me to tighten my groups considerably. It's worth looking into.

Start Here:

http://www.opticsbestbuy.com/

Randy
ive always thought that they would show a different tragectory than the bullet
 

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I am going to the camp and deer lease today.

The memory card on the trail camera needs to be swapped out - the trail camera thread and I need to finish sighting the rifle in. The scope is about an inch off at 100 feet. That is good enough to get me on the paper at 100 yards.
mustbe a big peice of paper lol.every time i shoot at 25 yards to sight my scope in im 8 9 10 inches high.shoot a few inches low at 25 yrds and you ll be with in your i inch dot at 100 yards.remember your scope is a couple inches high the line of sight.then its riseing comeing out of the barrel.you dont mean a inch off at a 100 yards?
 
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