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Smoking Meat

To smoke meat, prepare an enclosure around a fire (Figure 8-27). Two ponchos snapped together will work. The fire does not need to be big or hot. The intent is to produce smoke, not heat. Do not use resinous wood in the fire because its smoke will ruin the meat. Use hardwoods to produce good smoke. The wood should be somewhat green. If it is too dry, soak it. Cut the meat into thin slices, no more than 6 centimeters thick, and drape them over a framework. Make sure none of the meat touches another piece. Keep the poncho enclosure around the meat to hold the smoke and keep a close watch on the fire. Do not let the fire get too hot. Meat smoked overnight in this manner will last about 1 week. Two days of continuous smoking will preserve the meat for 2 to 4 weeks. Properly smoked meat will look like a dark, curled, brittle stick and you can eat it without further cooking. You can also use a pit to smoke meat (Figure 8-28).




Drying Meat

To preserve meat by drying, cut it into 6-millimeter strips with the grain. Hang the meat strips on a rack in a sunny location with good air flow. Keep the strips out of the reach of animals and cover them to keep blowflies off. Allow the meat to dry thoroughly before eating. Properly dried meat will have a dry, crisp texture and will not feel cool to the touch.
Other Preservation Methods

You can also preserve meats using the freezing or brine and salt methods.
Freezing

In cold climates, you can freeze and keep meat indefinitely. Freezing is not a means of preparing meat. You must still cook it before eating.
Brine and Salt

You can preserve meat by soaking it thoroughly in a saltwater solution. The solution must cover the meat. You can also use salt by itself. Wash off the salt before cooking.
 

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Numquam Succumbe
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I still haven't done this.

Does this work for EVERY kind of meat? Can I preserve fish this way? Clams? Crab?
 

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wage slave
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I like the Alton Brown method of making jerky. Take a box fan, set a clean furnace filter on it, lay out your thin seasoned strips of meat, put another filter on top (repeat as necessary) and hold it all together with a bungee. There is no heat, so it dries it instead of cooks it. I've never tried it, but I'd like to.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I like the Alton Brown method of making jerky. Take a box fan, set a clean furnace filter on it, lay out your thin seasoned strips of meat, put another filter on top (repeat as necessary) and hold it all together with a bungee. There is no heat, so it dries it instead of cooks it. I've never tried it, but I'd like to.
That sounds like a good idea, Thanks,, I used to make jerky a lot in a gas oven,, the old ones with a pilot light, you dont turn the oven on , but with the pilot light its very very dry in there,, takes a couple of days but works well,, I will try that Fan Idea,, sounds good, Thanks :)
 

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preparing
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That sounds like a good idea, Thanks,, I used to make jerky a lot in a gas oven,, the old ones with a pilot light, you dont turn the oven on , but with the pilot light its very very dry in there,, takes a couple of days but works well,,

thats how my dad always made it as well. mom hated it cause she couldn't use the oven for a few days and the entire house would reek of the jerky.
 

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Darting from the shadows
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Great post thanks Scott, I've preserved meat like this.
The only problem is it tasted so good we all scoffed it within 2 days. :thumb:
 
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I like the Alton Brown method of making jerky. Take a box fan, set a clean furnace filter on it, lay out your thin seasoned strips of meat, put another filter on top (repeat as necessary) and hold it all together with a bungee. There is no heat, so it dries it instead of cooks it. I've never tried it, but I'd like to.
I've made jerky using a box, wood skewers, and a fan to blow air across the hanging meat. It takes approximately 48 hours to dry once the meat has been skewered and hung. Don't bother with filters.

It turns out quite nice. I use it, along with home made hardtack, to carry in my cargo pockets during hunting trips. Unfortunately, sometimes the meat doesn't last long enough to make it to the hunt, and I'm left with just the hardtack....

The secret (IMO) is to cure the meat first. This ensures the meat remains safe to eat should you sucumb to temptation and eat some before it has been thoroughly dried.

The cure should be very salty and/or acidic. I use a bunch of salt (who measures?) and vinegar as my base. Other spices to flavor, such as black and dried red pepper are nice, but not necessary.

Wash your hands and tools before cutting the meat. Soak the cut strips of meat in the brine/acid solution overnight, and you're ready to hang the meat on skewers.

The US .gov sites recommend using heat, but I think it changes the taste too much.
 

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good stuff

All good ideas. I especially like the teepee method ive never seen that before. I always heard that smoked meat would be good for up to one year. Am I wrong or does it just need to be smoked longer? Great thread
 

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All good ideas. I especially like the teepee method ive never seen that before. I always heard that smoked meat would be good for up to one year. Am I wrong or does it just need to be smoked longer? Great thread
Shelf-life of Smoked Meats & Fish


Q. How long will smoked meats such as fish or poultry keep without refrigeration?

A. Such a simple question. Sadly, there is no answer. It's not that the answer is complex; it's that there is no answer. Smoking these days is primarily done to impart flavor, not for its preservative effects. Even in ancient times, smoking was an adjunct to salting and drying meats and fish, and in combination, could be relied upon to keep some foods almost indefinitely. But the "shelf-life" of preserved foods depends on many variables, including moisture content, density, and how well the surface of the food is sealed,,,

CONTINUED @

http://www.ochef.com/714.htm
 

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wage slave
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All good ideas. I especially like the teepee method ive never seen that before. I always heard that smoked meat would be good for up to one year. Am I wrong or does it just need to be smoked longer? Great thread
Pemmican has smoked\dried meat in it, as well as animal fat and berries and other stuff, and as far as I know has an indefinite shelf life. Supposedly pemmican has been dug up from archeological sites that was over a hundred years old and was still edible. It really is the perfect survival food because it is high in calories and full of nutrients.
 

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Pemmican has smoked\dried meat in it, as well as animal fat and berries and other stuff, and as far as I know has an indefinite shelf life. Supposedly pemmican has been dug up from archeological sites that was over a hundred years old and was still edible. It really is the perfect survival food because it is high in calories and full of nutrients.
For others as dumb as me,, this is what Pemmican is, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemmican

I had no idea,, :eek::
 

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Darting from the shadows
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Back of beyond!
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Smoking Meat

To smoke meat, prepare an enclosure around a fire (Figure 8-27). Two ponchos snapped together will work. The fire does not need to be big or hot. The intent is to produce smoke, not heat. Do not use resinous wood in the fire because its smoke will ruin the meat. Use hardwoods to produce good smoke. The wood should be somewhat green. If it is too dry, soak it. Cut the meat into thin slices, no more than 6 centimeters thick, and drape them over a framework. Make sure none of the meat touches another piece. Keep the poncho enclosure around the meat to hold the smoke and keep a close watch on the fire. Do not let the fire get too hot. Meat smoked overnight in this manner will last about 1 week. Two days of continuous smoking will preserve the meat for 2 to 4 weeks. Properly smoked meat will look like a dark, curled, brittle stick and you can eat it without further cooking. You can also use a pit to smoke meat (Figure 8-28).




Drying Meat

To preserve meat by drying, cut it into 6-millimeter strips with the grain. Hang the meat strips on a rack in a sunny location with good air flow. Keep the strips out of the reach of animals and cover them to keep blowflies off. Allow the meat to dry thoroughly before eating. Properly dried meat will have a dry, crisp texture and will not feel cool to the touch.
Other Preservation Methods

You can also preserve meats using the freezing or brine and salt methods.
Freezing

In cold climates, you can freeze and keep meat indefinitely. Freezing is not a means of preparing meat. You must still cook it before eating.
Brine and Salt

You can preserve meat by soaking it thoroughly in a saltwater solution. The solution must cover the meat. You can also use salt by itself. Wash off the salt before cooking.
Good info, scott, thanks!:thumb:
 

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Keeper of Tomes
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I've found that in moist climates drying meats in this manner is very problematic no matter how much smoke you produce. However, if you add a cooking syringe and a bottle of salt to your kit it dramatically increases your success rate. Just cut the meat as thinly as possible then mix a thick salt brine and inject it into the meat before smoking. This will decrease drying ties by almost half. I use plain ol' table salt and it works just fine.

Also I've found that if you take the needle off the syringe it works really well at flushing out debris from your eyes and wounds. Just make sure its clean of salt before use.
 

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Christian
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I've made jerky using a box, wood skewers, and a fan to blow air across the hanging meat. It takes approximately 48 hours to dry once the meat has been skewered and hung. Don't bother with filters.

It turns out quite nice. I use it, along with home made hardtack, to carry in my cargo pockets during hunting trips. Unfortunately, sometimes the meat doesn't last long enough to make it to the hunt, and I'm left with just the hardtack....

The secret (IMO) is to cure the meat first. This ensures the meat remains safe to eat should you sucumb to temptation and eat some before it has been thoroughly dried.

The cure should be very salty and/or acidic. I use a bunch of salt (who measures?) and vinegar as my base. Other spices to flavor, such as black and dried red pepper are nice, but not necessary.

Wash your hands and tools before cutting the meat. Soak the cut strips of meat in the brine/acid solution overnight, and you're ready to hang the meat on skewers.

The US .gov sites recommend using heat, but I think it changes the taste too much.
so you mix salt (super solution) and a touch of vinegar and soak the meat overnight, then two days in front of the fan and the meat is safe? how do you keep it after that just wax paper or a storage container? and are we talking steak strips or pork? Thanks in advance
 
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