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Sorry if this is posted elsewhere. I did a search and couldn't find anything.

I have done much research on canning foods. Everywhere I look, it's all done with a pressure cooker to kill the germs after you can them.
How did they do it 'back in the day'?
If there is no electricity or gas coming into your home for your stove, how would you preserve your garden veggies for the winter?
I have old pots my grandmother used 'old style', boiling the jars & lids in water and then placing the veggies in them (we ate this way from the time I can remember & I helped snap the beans). We always had canned/jarred veggies. Shoot, I didn't know veggies came in a tin can until I was in my teens!
No one ever got sick. My grandmother never used a pressure cooker but I do remember she would spend 'days' canning.

If we are thrown back to the old days of no electricity/gas coming into our homes, how would one go about preserving from their garden for the winter?
Thanks to all who can respond.
 

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Don't need a electricity or even a stove to can

You can still can; this guy says this: "Another myth that most people have about canning is that you need a stove. Almost all of my water bath canning is done on my fire pit in the side yard. I have a big pot that I suspend over the fire. I add water and build up the fire. By the way, it helps to have welding gloves to make working close to the fire easier. Once it's boiling, I add the jars and process for the recommended time. Pressure canning on a fire pit takes a little bit different set up. Since I don't want to melt the gasket or handles, I need to direct the flames a little bit. Two pieces of angle iron suspended over the fire and some ruffing tin with a hole cut in it will work on a basic level. Just make sure the jigglier stays jigging or that the pressure gauge reads the right amount, i.e., keep the fire built up. "

Read the rest, and get yourself a Ball canning book or the info from here.
 

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>>" Everywhere I look, it's all done with a pressure cooker to kill the germs after you can them. How did they do it 'back in the day'?"<<

they didn't! meat was dehydrated, brined, smoked, pickled! I am aware that some water bathed canned meat and cooked it for something like 18 hours! many died.. it wasn't until the invention of the pressure canner was canning non acidic food possible.


>>"If there is no electricity or gas coming into your home for your stove, how would you preserve your garden veggies for the winter?"<<

I have a stove that works off propane. I have a huge propane tank and many, many 5 gallon tanks. (they go to my camper, RV, I have 3 propane BBQ's and a couple extra's) I would get can on my stoves. I also have a camping stove that runs on propane, 3 burner got at costco just in case.

I would also pickle for a change of flavor, dehydrate to use in soups and stews as well as pot pies.


>>"I have old pots my grandmother used 'old style', boiling the jars & lids in water and then placing the veggies in them (we ate this way from the time I can remember & I helped snap the beans). We always had canned/jarred veggies. Shoot, I didn't know veggies came in a tin can until I was in my teens! No one ever got sick. My grandmother never used a pressure cooker but I do remember she would spend 'days' canning."<<


times have changed. We know so much more about canning and bacteria now then we did then. It is NOT a recommended practice.. besides.. why rick it when a wal-mart Presto is $89! (I have all american canners and tghey are a considerable amount more)

As I mentioned above, I am prepared to do my canning as usual. My first dehydrator was solar! LOL! wood frame and screening... I still use it and would make more of them since I also have 5 dehydrators that run on electric.
 

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Wood stove/fire pit over a grill made now I made a grill in welding class many years ago it was a one day project. Big square on the top with round stock as grills then angle iron as legs with a supporting flat steel going from the top to the legs.

In a pressure canner, the steam causes the internal temperature to rise to 240° F, which is a safe temperature to process low acid food such as meat or stuff with meat in it. Or so I am told buy several articles and people. The wood based fire is general hot enough to can with course you'll need some practice to cook/can with fire.
 

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I do a lot of drying to preserve my vegetables and fruit.

When it comes to meat, I plan on eating rabbit and chicken, because they are meal size already. However, if a deer came into my site, it would be dinner and I would take meat around to some of my neighbors (helpfull neighbors).
 

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For meats.smoking and salting. salting can also work with some vegies.

Stock pile glass jars. reusable washable and you can get a great seal on it.

but most importantly.

have a root cellar. deep and cold. will help to keep fresh food longer and the preserved even longer
 

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Wood stove/fire pit over a grill made now I made a grill in welding class many years ago it was a one day project. Big square on the top with round stock as grills then angle iron as legs with a supporting flat steel going from the top to the legs.

In a pressure canner, the steam causes the internal temperature to rise to 240° F, which is a safe temperature to process low acid food such as meat or stuff with meat in it. Or so I am told buy several articles and people. The wood based fire is general hot enough to can with course you'll need some practice to cook/can with fire.
Wood fire is plenty hot enough, directing the heat where you want it is the problem. Getting lids or rings is the limiting factor. Wonder if anyone has ever tried reconditioning lids with bath tub silicone or thiokol.
 

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canning lids

I read once that if you put your used lids on in water with baking soda added (don't remember how much probably at least 1 tblsp) & boil for 20 minutes that reconditions the lids & they can be reused. I tried that once & the lids look (almost) like new. Be sure to rinse the soda off before you use them. I think I used them on something I processed in a water bath but I don't know about using them in a pressure canner. I've been stocking up on jar lids & buy 2 boxes of each about once a month year round, more in the summer. I have a supply built up. I don't save the used ones but if the need arises I will. I've also saved the jars & lids like what certain brands of dips, salsa, etc come in & have reused those. Just treat that lid with the rubber seal just like you would a jar lid. I've had good success in a water bath, but again haven't used in a pressure canner.
 

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The easiest food to store without using much fuel are dry grains, beans, nuts, dried or jerked meat, and livestock on the hoof. While I am learning to can veggies in my own jars, I do not plan to use stored fuel for that.

I would prefer to use a modest solar panel system to power a convensional chest freezer.
 

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there's a book on Amazon, cant remember the name, but it was something like "How to preserve food without freezing , canning or...."

also, most root vegetables can be stored in a "clamp", which is something like layers of straw and sand, i think....and digging a root cellar would be a great idea....supposedly there are vars of onions that will store 6-8 months if cured properly...and again, many root vegetables and other vegetables can be stored for months in a cellar...also, i think you can make stuff like sauerkraut w/out any electricity, and similar products like kimchee, the koreans make that at room temp in the winter iirc...

if you live in the city though, things would be tough if the S ever HTF....
 

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it has been brought up before, here you go:

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=78575

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=1532

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=4961

here's my replies:

might i suggest:

Preserving food without freezing or canning

and

Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods

Also, stockpile salt. Any and all salt. Salt can be used as a disinfectant, to preserve food, etc... So buy it by the bucket and when you think you have enough for 5 years, double it....

here's some books on making kimchi (various types)

Kimchi

Goodmorning Kimchi!

Making Saur Kraut

Quick and Easy Tsukemono

Easy Japanese Pickeling


Videos:

Broccoli Pickles

Cabbage Kimchi & Kakktoogi (radish kimchi; oysters & fish sauce optional)

kkaennip kimchi (korean shiso kimchi)

kkaennip jangahji (korean shiso pickle in soy sauce)

oijangaji (1 version of a korean cucumber pickle)

oisobagi (spicy stuffed cucumber kimchi)

yeolmu kimchi (young summer radish water radish kimchi)


============================

I make kimchi all the time. I usually have about 6 varieties in my fridge at a time.

Here's some recipes, from Maangchi. She's a Korean lady & makes videos & puts them on her website (maangchi.com) for people to download. :) The recipes themselves are also on her website, along with a multitude of other items.

Broccoli Pickles

Cabbage Kimchi & Kakktoogi Kakktoogi is a type of radish kimchi. Oysters & fish sauce optional. I like to add shredded or julienned carrots, shredded or julienned korean radish (or daikon), sometimes watercress and pepper threads. You can find the sweet rice flour in Asian markets. It is not the same as regular rice flour.

kkaennip kimchi (korean shiso kimchi)

kkaennip jangahji (korean shiso pickle in soy sauce)

oijangaji (1 version of a korean cucumber pickle)

oisobagi (spicy stuffed cucumber kimchi)

yeolmu kimchi (young summer radish water radish kimchi)[/quote]


This lady also has a nice video on making Kimchi. She's very nice! :)


Here's a good video on making Kimchi Chigae (kimchi soup)


Here's a nice one on how to make kimchi fried rice

If you poke around on Youtube, you can find quite an array of Korean recipes. Everybody has their own way of doing stuff. I've not found anyone that makes kimchi the way I like it (extremely hot).. lol In my opinion, if you can see the cabbage, you didn't put enough stuff on it! lol I love kimchi! :thumb: :D: You might also check out Evil Jungle Prince. He makes some nice kimchi!

Oh, also, you may be interested in checking out http://www.zenkimchi.com/ and if you don't wanna make kimchi or don't know what it tastes like- DO NOT get the garbage in the stores!!! Get some Granny Choe's Kimchi!!! If you're gonna buy it, that's the stuff to get!
 

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Water bath canning is for anything high acid or high sugar (often both, as it will usually be fruits, pickles, or relishes.)

Pressure canning is for things like beef, pork, fish, poultry, peas, greenbeans - see a pattern here? Low acid foods that don't have alot of sugar added. Way back when, the pressure in "pressure canning" was supplied by a big rock. Eventually someone figured out that a 10 pound rock was just right. If you have (or can soon get) a modern one, it won't matter where the heat comes from, just that you follow the directions, set the little weight unit correctly, and keep the pressure where it's supposed to be for the right amount of time. If possible, you might consider spares for the guage and weight unit, as they are removable and easily serviced.

Don't forget meat isn't the only thing that can be dried - many fruits go quite well dried (most of the ones that are good cooked anyway.) And veggies aren't the only things to get brined/pickled. I am looking for a good recipe for corned beef so I can give that a shot!

Many things with really hard rinds will keep for a very long period in a root cellar - skip the cute little "pie pumpkins" from the grocery store and grow some fairy tale pumpkins (or hubbard squash, or similar with a really hard rind) as a starter project to get the feel of it. Hardest rind I've seen was on a fairy tale, even cooked one down and made pie after it had been sitting outside, off the vine, for way longer than I'd usually suggest letting a pumpkin wait. The rind was just that much protection for it. Then when you have the kinks worked out and feel comfortable with root cellar storage, switch back to whatever your favorite heirloom variety is. ;)

Carrots, turnips, potatoes, and similar can be kept as fresh produce for months if you have a root cellar, but read up on how to do it so you don't end up ruining the lot. I've never had a root cellar but want one desperately, so I've been reading alot about them. I didn't know that apples will often keep well in one for a while if you have other harvesting or butchering to do before you get around to canning or drying them. I believe some cabbages will also store well for a good amount of time, because they grow so tightly closed.

Not a big fan of cabbage soup, but I would eat it before I would skip a meal.
 

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Wood fire is plenty hot enough, directing the heat where you want it is the problem. Getting lids or rings is the limiting factor. Wonder if anyone has ever tried reconditioning lids with bath tub silicone or thiokol.
I ordered Tattler reuseble canning lids and will get more when I can afford it.
http://shop.reusablecanninglids.com/main.sc
In the meantime, I stock both sizes of lids each time I go grocery shopping.
I have only a hot water bath canner but you can still do a lot with that, and I've got a neighbor with a pressure canner, we could have a canning session together some day.
You can also make sauerkraut and use other vegetables besides cabbage. It's a welcome change to have something sour in the diet now and then.
 
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