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I've noticed women in their late 30's and 40's begin to appreciate the joy of nature.

However, women in their late teens and twenties rarely find backpacking as their top ten activity. Things not involving attracting large groups of men in public places don't seem to interest them. Not much interest in attracting the few elderly men we come across on the trails.

How can I give them the feeling of being attractive out in no where?
or
How can I instill in them the appreciation for nature and isolation?

Or should I just wait until I am in my 40's before taking a women backpacking?
 

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I got with a city slicker girl myself who did not spend anytime in the forest. One trip is all it took to change that. If they don't find the appreciation in nature after being out in it, then there is no point trying to force something that isn't there. Good luck hunting Hors haha
 

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trois pour cent
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I've noticed women in their late 30's and 40's begin to appreciate the joy of nature.

However, women in their late teens and twenties rarely find backpacking as their top ten activity. Things not involving attracting large groups of men in public places don't seem to interest them. Not much interest in attracting the few elderly men we come across on the trails.

How can I give them the feeling of being attractive out in no where?
or
How can I instill in them the appreciation for nature and isolation?

Or should I just wait until I am in my 40's before taking a women backpacking?
I find there are huge regional differences in how young women view backpacking. I am female, I am from the South but have lived worked and backpacked all over America, including a years in Alaska and several more years in the Pacific Northwest and in Northern Maine.

In the South, it's hard to find other women who are interested in backpacking. There are a few, but it's not common. For that matter, it's not that common an activity for men in the South either.

In Montana and Alaska it was hard to find women who had not backpacked. Hiking is a common activity for couples, along with kayaking or skiing. Even berry picking. If you live in Anchorage, a hike to the top of Flattop Mountain for the amazing view is almost a mandatory courtship activity.

In Alaska, almost everyone backpacked, fished, paddled. And to me, everyone is more attractive five miles from the nearest road. That's where you can really see them. To me, we all look better in our natural habitat.:)

Has nothing to do with feeling attractive. More to do with an appreciation of the beauty of nature and the sense of peace that comes with spending a day as I believe we were meant to live.

Women in the South may fish or even hunt, but rarely backpack. But for that matter, it's not a popular activity for men in the South either. It seems to be more of a cultural difference.

JMHO
 

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I just took my girlfriend backpacking last week. She had never been so I bought her a pack and a couple little things (spork, camelbak bladder, cup, etc...) she was excited to have her own gear and really enjoyed the trip. She wants to go again so we will be taking another trip over thanksgiving break.

Try and find ways for her to be involved so she isn't just watching you do everything. I had my girlfriend help me collect wood when we set up camp and she helped light the fire and cook dinner.
 

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When my children were quite small, I was friends with a couple who were avid
backpacker's, hiker's, camper's. Their children were a bit older than mine.

I had done all of those things prior to having children, but once I had them I stopped. So I asked my friends how they managed to continue being so outdoorsy, without an ordeal with the kids.

They gave me some advice which I'd like to share with you.

#1. Start small. Whether you're dealing with a man, woman or child who isn't accustomed to camping, hiking, fishing, hunting, hiking or what-ever activity...start out with a couple of hours at most. Stop the activity when they're having fun, not when they're slap worn out. By doing this, the memory of 'how much fun it was' will be ingrained.

#2. Organize everything down to the smallest detail. Be prepared with food, snacks, water, toilet comforts, insect repellant, first aid kit and appropriate clothing. Have them help pack their own back pack.

#3. Think of activities you can do while out in nature. Field guides to birds, insects and trees are awesome to get them to identify and get used to their 'new' environment. Pack a camera and binoculars. Let them take as many photos as they want, then when you get home plan another time to sit down and put the photos into scrapbook albums.

#4. And last but the most important thing is to remember, this trip isn't about YOU, it's about THEM. If you ever want them to do it again, make it as pleasant and fun as possible.
 

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dum dum
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I find there are huge regional differences in how young women view backpacking. I am female, I am from the South but have lived worked and backpacked all over America, including a years in Alaska and several more years in the Pacific Northwest and in Northern Maine.

In the South, it's hard to find other women who are interested in backpacking. There are a few, but it's not common. For that matter, it's not that common an activity for men in the South either.

In Montana and Alaska it was hard to find women who had not backpacked. Hiking is a common activity for couples, along with kayaking or skiing. Even berry picking. If you live in Anchorage, a hike to the top of Flattop Mountain for the amazing view is almost a mandatory courtship activity.

In Alaska, almost everyone backpacked, fished, paddled. And to me, everyone is more attractive five miles from the nearest road. That's where you can really see them. To me, we all look better in our natural habitat.:)

Has nothing to do with feeling attractive. More to do with an appreciation of the beauty of nature and the sense of peace that comes with spending a day as I believe we were meant to live.

Women in the South may fish or even hunt, but rarely backpack. But for that matter, it's not a popular activity for men in the South either. It seems to be more of a cultural difference.

JMHO
It's the heat. In the south, the heat can become unbearable, and they associate that with "outdoors". Hot, sweaty, mosquitoes, sweat and dirt...no plumbing...
Funny thing is they don't realize guys dig hot sweaty girls.:thumb: Still, there are plenty of women in the south that enjoy backpacking, In fact, some have to convince their women that they wouldn't have fun so the guys can get away from the women-folk for a spell...:D:
 

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1. Keep the miles low for the first time. Don't take her on a 20 mile death march. About 5-7 miles, flat or minimal elevation gain is good for a first timer.

2. Pick a good destination, lake, base of a mountain, flower filled meadow. Watch the seasons, if she's swatting at swarms of black flies she'll never want to go again.

3. Pack in the heavy stuff, but let her pack in her own water, extra clothes, some other light stuff, like the first aid kit, water filter, her own sleeping bag.

4. If it's your wife or girlfriend, make it a little romantic. Pack in some chocolate, a good first night out meal (steak frozen at home), some wine in a Nalgene or Platypus container.

Above all, make it enjoyable for them, then they'll be more likely to go backpacking again.
My first backtrip was with a group in a howling Pacific storm in February which we ended up bailing. And I'm still out there! :)
 

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Tell them there is a really good discount shopping mall at the end of the trail lol
This might just work!! Although, I tend to think that an appreciation for nature has to be instilled in a person when they are much younger. I know I fell in love with hiking and backpacking on family vacations. I think in order to learn to love the outdoors at an older age you would need to have someone you looked up to and respected take you out and introduce you to the benefits. As far as getting them out there... preparedmama has the idea :thumb:
 
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