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Discussion Starter #1
Most People are on a buget hell even millionaires are but theres an easy way to add up some extra cash over a few months. Spare change take all your spare change and put it in a jar for 3 months like a mason jar 16oz will fill up in about 3 months. Youll get anywhere from $150-$200 dollars every 3 months thats $1800-$2400 dollars a year now that can buy some decent new gear. And if you got a family that spends hell it adds up even faster. And makes an excellent Emergency Fund.
 

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Scandinavian survivor
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Funny, I just started doing this a week ago...
 

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All bark, no bite
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That's how we pay our vehicle insurance. Always have a little left over for seed for the next payment. :thumb:
 

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Sweat more, bleed less!
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I try to do that but it always gets used for the damn vending machines at work...

i'm going to have to get a time lock safe that only opens once every three months.
 

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Awesome, I started this 11yrs ago, today accually. When my daughter was born my wife and I sat done and had a talk and one of the topics was a vehicle for her when she came of age to drive. We came up with emptying my pockets/her purse of all change into a 3ft high pepsi bottle/piggy bank. At Christmas every year we will count the change, use a little for some gifts and the rest go into my daughters account. To date she's got about 7K in her account, now you got me thinkin hey that's a good down payment and maybe I should start doing this for some more gear or whatever.
 

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Sweat more, bleed less!
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I'm talking crackers and such...i only drink water at work and mostly at home too.

I need to make a trip to Sams again.
 

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Coins
You will also need coins. Gold and silver might be
useful during the rebuilding stage several years
after the crisis, but for the first couple of years, ordinary
dimes and quarters, nickels and pennies
will be the most easily traded form of money. In a
massive deflation, which is what a financial crash
would create, real hard money becomes far more
valuable. A loaf of bread that costs $1.25 today
may cost 5 cents afterwards assuming there’s any
bread to be had. People are completely used to
ordinary pocket change coins, so that’s what they
will most readily accept for local transactions—
and I believe nearly all transactions will be local
after a major national disaster.
You need to start saving up a coin stash. Once a
month or so, take a few $20 bills to a bank in which
you do not have an account and trade them for
rolls of quarters or dollar coins. Any bank will exchange
paper for coins without question.

Money
The first thing to understand is that nearly all of
the current money supply is in the form of electronic
data entries on computers rather than in
cash. Most of the wealth of the world is in promises
to pay (credit) rather than in cash. Of the
approximately $460 billion U.S. money supply,
only about 4%, $17.9 billion, in cash is currently
circulating in the U.S. (according to the St. Louis
Fed figures for June, 1998). The rest is held by
individuals, companies, banks and governments
in foreign countries. When a disaster hits
and the computers in the banks or ATMs go
down, or if there are bank runs, all that electronic
wealth could evaporate overnight. In the
event of a national disaster, the total money supply
could shrink by 96%.
Only those who have cash
will be wealthy after a national disaster; survival
requires cash.
Can’t the government simply print enough paper
money to replace all the electronic money
? The answer is no, it’s impossible. The
presses at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing
are already running at capacity 24 hours a
day just to replace the paper money that wears
out each year. To replace just the $17.9 billion
of paper currency currently circulating would
take 2 years at the current BEP printing capacity.
It would take several decades to replace the
entire $460 billion.
It has been reported that the Fed has been printing
and stockpiling cash in case of a bank run,
and they will have an extra $50 billion on hand
along with $150 billion they have apparently been
secretly stockpiling for years. This makes a possible
total of $218 billion just in case. Even if this
is true, $218 billion is a long, long way from $460
billion and light years away from $7 trillion, which
is the total value of the entire U.S. economy. Note
that if the total U.S. economy is worth $7 trillion
but that only $460 billion of that total exists as physical
cash (and only $17.9 billion is circulating within
our borders), then the vast majority of the wealth
of America is obviously only electronic, credit
money. After a major disaster or financial crash,
no banks or no electricity or no oil or coal or no
trains means no electronic wealth. We’re back to
an all-cash economy.

This is information from the LDS Preparedness Manual (222 total pages). There is a bit more information about gold, but in the first few years after SHTF, cash and coins could be important. Instead of cashing in the coins, you might want to keep them.
 

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well see the thing is i have to outdo my best friend, so the ring has to be bigger than his wife's ring. just cause we compete in everything.
I wonder, do you guy's compete to see who has the most guns/ammo or maybe and even more important food/supplies stores, I'm guessing not.:(
 

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Suspect Everyone
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225 Posts
Like the concept...not the math

Youll get anywhere from $150-$200 dollars every 3 months thats $1800-$2400 dollars a year now that can buy some decent new gear. And if you got a family that spends hell it adds up even faster. And makes an excellent Emergency Fund.
If I get your maximum of $200 every 3 months, I am nowhere near your totals of $1800-2400. That would be a total of $800 a year.

Still, I like the idea. $800 can buy some good stuff.
 

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If I get your maximum of $200 every 3 months, I am nowhere near your totals of $1800-2400. That would be a total of $800 a year.

Still, I like the idea. $800 can buy some good stuff.
Yeh, his math's a little off but I understood excactly what he's talkin about.
 

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Looking ahead
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2,178 Posts
I started doing this years ago. I usually use the change to pay for a weekend stay in a hotel during our buget vacations.

Another great way to save money is to use a water bottle. I have about 5 good insulated water bottles that I rotate. When I'm thirsty I always have some ice cold water nearby and so I don't waste any money buying cola or "bottled" water.
 

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I started putting coin away some time ago. Actually started the practice in elementary school so I can buy toys I wanted. It ads up quick.

Other suggestions may include:
Drink water at home and make fresh juices instead of buying them and make your home as energy efficient as possible.

In regards to coin and cash in times of crisis:
Also consider barter items such as chocolates, cigarettes in freezer, maybe extra batteries, sometimes these items could get you further than cash/coin.
 

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Deo VIndice
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6,108 Posts
I used to eat lunch in the company cafeteria. It ran 3.50-6.00, each day. For the last 5 weeks, I have brought either leftovers or cans of chili or soup or something like that.

At say, $5 a day, that's $25 a week for 5 weeks, that's $125.00.

Makes a big difference right now, since things are tight!
 

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If you shop w/coupons or use a store savings card, take the savings from that and put it away. It adds up pretty quick.
 
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