Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,025 Posts
I haven't heard Long Island accents like that since the Rangers vs. Islanders games in 1992 at Madison Square Garden.

Go Rangers!

Tom.
 

·
Ooops - missed heddle
Joined
·
1,187 Posts
My mom taught this to me when I was a youngster. To this day I can't figure out why people pay outrageous prices for 2 chicken breasts, when they could buy the whole chicken, most times, for the same amount of money. Occasionally I'll buy a cut-up chicken if I know I want chicken that night and am lazy. Mostly, though, I just bristle at the extra cost per pound.

There are a few different ways of going about this. The gal at my rural grocery store whacks a chicken up differently from me, and I won't get them cut up there. Atlas's link showed a way I've never seen before. I was taught to take off the thighs and legs first, then the wings and then separate the breasts from the back.

When I got to searching for a link for my way, I did, however, learn a thing I never ever was told - that's about following the fat line. Mom always had me bending the thigh and leg to feel the joint; same with wing, etc. Following the fat line was a Doh! moment for me.

I liked this link the best: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zW5BFvCmV7k

And this one second best: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSvzRyu2h5g

The only thing I do different is to cut off the part of the breast closest to the neck to separate the wishbone piece before separating the breasts. We always loved pulling the wishbone. Additionally, it makes the breasts a bit smaller, which is good for dieting and feeding large families.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
30,718 Posts
I like that presentation too.

Cutting chicken is a no brainer for me and I think I've heard every trick under the sun.

But beyond the skill of the job itself is the skill of education and presentation.

That presentation was perfect. Clear and uncomplicated without excess noise.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Weft

·
In Memory
Joined
·
10,934 Posts
Unless I want chicken meat boneless, or pan fried, I generally break them down after cooking.





Wash, trim fat, wing tips, butt, clip out spine & shake on seasoning.

Then “steam/bake” = spread eagle breast up on a rack in broiling pan.
½ inch water inside pan, bake @ 350/375, baste when near done.
Remove from oven when internal meat temp is + 165 & break down.





QUICK/EASY & very near or PERFECT – EVERY TIME

Serve on top something like this.



With these baked in the oven at the same time.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,089 Posts
Unless I want chicken meat boneless, or pan fried, I generally break them down after cooking.





Wash, trim fat, wing tips, butt, clip out spine & shake on seasoning.

Then “steam/bake” = spread eagle breast up on a rack in broiling pan.
½ inch water inside pan, bake @ 350/375, baste when near done.
Remove from oven when internal meat temp is + 165 & break down.





QUICK/EASY & very near or PERFECT – EVERY TIME

Serve on top something like this.



With these baked in the oven at the same time.

That's the spatchcock technique. Didn't notice the breastbone removed though. I always do that when I put them on the pit. Cooks faster and more evenly. Now, I'm no expert in butchering a chicken the conventional way, but it usually resembles what you normally see..:rolleyes:
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top