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People used to see duck and cover infomercials on TV, people used to have home gardens, people used to talk to their neighbors, friends and family.


What do we do now? We eat out at fast food places, we keep very little food at home, almost nobody has a garden, chicken yards are a thing of the past.

There are exceptions to what I am posting, this is referring to the average person.

What has happened to our factories, jobs and society?

Our jobs have moved to china,
There is unrest in the streets,
Wide spread drought is driving up the price of food,
Our government is corrupt,

How much more can the people take before something is going to break?
 

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Survivus most anythingus
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What has happened to our factories, jobs and society?

Our jobs have moved to china,
There is unrest in the streets,
Wide spread drought is driving up the price of food,
Our government is corrupt,

How much more can the people take before something is going to break?
Our government is apparently trying to out-Orwell George Orwell.

As far as the jobs going overseas and other employment problems, it's primarily because a lot of people, by accident or on purpose, confuse patriotism with uncontrolled capitalism which inevitably colludes with government to morph into crony capitalism which is what we have now. Patriotism and capitalism are not and have never been the same thing.
 

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Welcome to the rice field
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How and when it will happen, no one knows. But the rise and fall of societies is inevitable. Clearly, in this modern age very few have the skills to survive a collapse, but some will. Some always do. At best, they can learn from the mistakes of those who came before and improve. There is a natural cycle to all life. Humanity is no different. When we overstep the balance (which we have) the pendulum is fated to swing the other way. All we can do is prepare ourselves and give our children as much knowledge and tools as possible.

 

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Getting There!
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That's largely correct, in that the normal person evidently thinks that FEMA will save them, or that any event will be short in duration.

Thanks to all of the non-normal folks who get together here! Raise a glass!

Corporations have proved themselves as corrupt, or more corrupt than the government. These are the institutions that move jobs from the US as the top management make out like crooks. These are the institutions that fund dirty politicians.

Not all corporations are corrupt, or as corrupt as others. I still view corporations as one of the basic problems right now. Deregulation is not always a good thing.
 

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How prepared is modern society?

Very well prepared. Sometimes it is easy to lose sight of this for all the background drumbeat of anticipated disaster. Not that disaster can not happen because it does routinely on individual and regional levels. But when you think of the resources available today it is just staggering.

When I walk into any of the Gigantic shopping complexes, that exist in our country now, it is a constant reminder of the total wealth available. With the Internet I can find anything and everything and it is shipped to my remote doorstep. This level of goods simply did not exist in the past. Access to goods like fresh vegetables in the Winter and prepared foods that simply take warming ( you can argue about quality and health risks but starvation is unlikely in the first world countries) up.

Tools are readily available as well. Portable generators, heating sources, chainsaws and heavy equipment are now standard things for people to have. Most small farms need machine shops to keep all their equipment functional.

Sure there are a vast group of ignorant people. But there is also a large group of very smart, resourceful people. These smart folks are helped with the tools and goods that they have to keep things going. They know how to restore after a disaster happens.

If disaster comes to modern society it will take something very big indeed to overcome all the baseline goods and skilled people. The only one that I can see (baring a mega natural disaster) is when the sheer numbers of people exhaust the available resources in the world. When oil runs low and there is no replacement (alternative energy we now have is insufficient to be a replacement) than the inevitable wars for whats left will begin. As far as I can see we will not run out of fossil fuels for another 50 years. I will be long dead when that happens.
 

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Getting There!
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If disaster comes to modern society it will take something very big indeed to overcome all the baseline goods and skilled people. The only one that I can see (baring a mega natural disaster) is when the sheer numbers of people exhaust the available resources in the world.
I'm 145 miles north east of Houston. Hurricane Rita cleaned our clock and found a large number of people fleeing from the coast stuck here. We were stripped of fuel and there was no resupply for 5-6 days.

Walmart closed due to people fighting over the dwindling items on the bare shelves. They used bundled cardboard to barricade the entrances.

The entire area was without electricity. We had a generator and gas to run it and sat this out quite comfortably. The vast majority did not. It was an ugly ordeal that pitted those fleeing against the locals. The local law enforcement was over run badly. Luckily, it's a large state and troopers from all over were sent to help maintain order. They had to escort gasoline tankers in. People were going berserk. The hotels were full and their gas tanks were empty.

Rita came in on the heels of Katrina. We evidently learned little from Katrina, as this whole area was a mess. The evacuation was horrible. People ran out of fuel, as traffic was inching along all the way from Houston to here.

That's one single event that we saw coming days before land fall.

Maybe you have top witness such to fully realize just how bad off we were. I tend to look at the smaller picture now, rather than the long range, such as peak oil.

Of all things that can go badly this was just a blip.
 

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...

That's one single event that we saw coming days before land fall.

Maybe you have top witness such to fully realize just how bad off we were. I tend to look at the smaller picture now, rather than the long range, such as peak oil.

Of all things that can go badly this was just a blip.
And where are you now? Still without power, lacking communication and modern goods? WROL? I suspect that other than the things utterly destroyed by the hurricane (Louisiana, and the Golf states.. Mississippi, Alabama...) most everything else is back to normal modern society standards.


I did say that disaster on a individual and regional level is very possible but with our modern world the resources to recover are immense. I have seen for myself cities that are gone due to Tornadoes. I have seen people die in floods. I have also watched the rebuilding afterwards.

Sure people stripped the stores. But how much of that was from desperation (and criminal behavior) and how much from real need? I bet there was enough food that no one died of starvation.

BTW: Good job on being prepared yourself. That was one less family that required help of the strained law and rescue organizations had to deal with. People should be prepared and not hope for someone to save them.
 

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I'm 145 miles north east of Houston. Hurricane Rita cleaned our clock and found a large number of people fleeing from the coast stuck here. We were stripped of fuel and there was no resupply for 5-6 days.

Walmart closed due to people fighting over the dwindling items on the bare shelves. They used bundled cardboard to barricade the entrances.

The entire area was without electricity. We had a generator and gas to run it and sat this out quite comfortably. The vast majority did not. It was an ugly ordeal that pitted those fleeing against the locals. The local law enforcement was over run badly. Luckily, it's a large state and troopers from all over were sent to help maintain order. They had to escort gasoline tankers in. People were going berserk. The hotels were full and their gas tanks were empty.

Rita came in on the heels of Katrina. We evidently learned little from Katrina, as this whole area was a mess. The evacuation was horrible. People ran out of fuel, as traffic was inching along all the way from Houston to here.

That's one single event that we saw coming days before land fall.

Maybe you have top witness such to fully realize just how bad off we were. I tend to look at the smaller picture now, rather than the long range, such as peak oil.

Of all things that can go badly this was just a blip.
To be fair, half the people who had to evacuate from Rita were people who had already evacuated due to Katrina. It was one helluva double whammy.

I was in the 82nd Airborne in '05 and spent a month in Nawlins as part of the relief effort. After about 2 weeks, Walmart was open and stocked, and McDonalds was back to cranking out cheeseburgers.

Too many of the people of New Orleans felt that nothing bad could happen to them. Too many more people there were dependent on Government handouts that took far too long to get to them. The lawlessness of the city was ridiculous. Posse Comitatus was almost suspended, but a few vagrants shot down by the National Guard quelled most of the idiots shooting at each other within the first week. The Posse Comitatus act was changed in October 2006, giving the federal government far more leeway to use the military domestically. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posse_Comitatus_Act will give you more information.


When it comes down to it, what the people of New Orleans took for granted, government assistance, failed them. But their biggest mistake was to stay in the city in the first place! I don't think I have to explain to any member of this community that a threat as big as Katrina should have sent everyone packing. There's no excuse for the fact that hundreds of buses didn't leave New Orleans filled with evacuees due to the fact that NO Evacuees showed up to take them!


Ok, on the whole, I feel that our modern society is far better able to deal with any variety of short-term disaster. Society as a whole, that is. Members of this community are far better able to deal with these types of situations as individuals. The sheeple will be fine as long as there is no "permanent" damage to infrastructure. They will survive without electricity and running water for a week or two. It won't be easy, they won't like it, but they'll survive. Walmart will reopen, and they can go back to pleasantly chewing their cud, having survived a horrible ordeal, while the rest of us will return to our normal lives knowing that another ordeal survived us.
 

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OMG, in the video!

Dude gets distracted by a squirrel. Reminded me of this:

"Squirrel!"

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q...35AE431B51549FFA5CF035AE43&first=0&FORM=LKVR1

I'm sorry, after that I couldn't even pay attention to the rest the first time through. I had to keep going back and play Kev getting distracted from what he's saying by his version of 'Squirrel' for a d*mn squirrel in his field of view. Dude, cut that out, it erodes the presentation.

Then the whining begins:

1. It's not the retailers responsibility to provide rotation friendly cabinets if there's no market. Don't whine about it.
2. It's not the government's job to drum preparedness into people's heads. Don't whine about it.
3. It's not the grocery stores duty to provide items there might not be a market for. Don't whine about it.

Then we drift into some rambling about banks. This wasn't any different than the "I'm the 99%" level of lacking individual responsibility. This video is a complaint about not receiving support on prepping effort.

"Squirrel!"






BTW, I'm older than him and 'Duck and Cover' wasn't shown much by any time he'd be old enough to remember.
 

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People used to see duck and cover infomercials on TV, people used to have home gardens, people used to talk to their neighbors, friends and family.


What do we do now? We eat out at fast food places, we keep very little food at home, almost nobody has a garden, chicken yards are a thing of the past.

There are exceptions to what I am posting, this is referring to the average person.

What has happened to our factories, jobs and society?

Our jobs have moved to china,
There is unrest in the streets,
Wide spread drought is driving up the price of food,
Our government is corrupt,

How much more can the people take before something is going to break?
Honestly I believe we were blinded along the way and it is just now that many of society are realizing that the ship has holes and is sinking. Honestly most every person has the ability to add to society. Someone mentioned about people being utterly stupid during the Hurricanes. I have always wondered why people would not brace for or prepare for these. You knew they were coming ... tornadoes are quick and you can sometimes get a warning but again come on! Prepare. We were not directly hit back in April but we were directly affected. We were prepared as we could be without a shelter in our backyard. Back to my original train of thought I will say that at a time our government seemed to want us to survive but they seem all to eager for us to perish or they want to break our spirit even more to cause us to become "slaves" to whatever they ideas are. Civil Defense was a great thing. They helped you prepare and encouraged it. FEMA is more openly telling people to prepare as well again. I personally feel that along the way people were pushed to believe the government was there to take care of them and that they would not need to be responsible in any way. I remember watching Andrew and the devastation it unleashed but it seems that was forgotten ie Katrina. I think our technology is rotting our society. People thought TV would years ago and I always thought "yeah right that's extreme" but I think we are seeing the effects of our technology. People live on line and wonder why they don't have time to get things done.

We are a very capable society but people will have to realize soon.
 

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I was born in the 80's and I grew up in the south. I barely remember being taught duck and cover but they also tied that into earthquake safety. Stop and think though ... this is Alabama. We also learned every year about numerous natural disasters. I remember seeing the OLD duck and cover commercials in my cartoons as well but I didn't really understand what they were. I remember they would show the flash of light outside the classroom and then kids would dash under their desk. When we were later taught in school (kindergarten) to do this it was through a teachers instructions not the actually event (mostly because we didn't know what we were really doing yet and there weren't any windows in a 25% of the classrooms)

I believe it falls on society to be ready but our government should see the benefit of having the American population prepared. It worked before and it was also during a time of American superiority. Why not bring those two things back?
 

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Remember KATRINA people were looting and beating each other while on their way to a sports stadium waiting for the gov to bring everything they needed. In the mean time there was rape,s and beating,s and theft going on in the stadium even the military didnt go in there. And that was just in the first few days. Multiply that by 100,s of thousands of people with no law being enforced. Im glad i live in the mts AND I AM PREPARED. all those people in the cities will loot and kill as soon as they can. THEY ARE THE VAST MAJORITY of americans and THEY ARE NOT PREPARED
 

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I am of the mind there may be more of "us" out there than we realize. A lot of people I know "prep" don't think of it in the same terms, although the net effect is the same.

Those people avoid being referred to as "survivalists" because of the negative connotation attached. They don't want to be mistaken for "one of those" instead they prefer to be known as just folks putting a little aside for "a rainy day".

They may or may not "lurk" at sites like this for information but they hunt, fish and tend their gardens, canning what they don't use fresh.

They will be a valuable asset when TSHTF because they are living the life now.
 

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Katrina was a wake up call for a Large scale disaster as to who is preppered and who is not ...The worst of the worst was shown on a small scale...Take a whole region of 5 million or 10 million and see what Happens... Not a situation I want to be caught in come SHTF.
 

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I'm 145 miles north east of Houston. Hurricane Rita cleaned our clock and found a large number of people fleeing from the coast stuck here. We were stripped of fuel and there was no resupply for 5-6 days.

Walmart closed due to people fighting over the dwindling items on the bare shelves. They used bundled cardboard to barricade the entrances.

The entire area was without electricity. We had a generator and gas to run it and sat this out quite comfortably. The vast majority did not. It was an ugly ordeal that pitted those fleeing against the locals. The local law enforcement was over run badly. Luckily, it's a large state and troopers from all over were sent to help maintain order. They had to escort gasoline tankers in. People were going berserk. The hotels were full and their gas tanks were empty.

Rita came in on the heels of Katrina. We evidently learned little from Katrina, as this whole area was a mess. The evacuation was horrible. People ran out of fuel, as traffic was inching along all the way from Houston to here.

That's one single event that we saw coming days before land fall.

Maybe you have top witness such to fully realize just how bad off we were. I tend to look at the smaller picture now, rather than the long range, such as peak oil.

Of all things that can go badly this was just a blip.
I think you actually proved Mattb4's hypothesis correct!

Why you might ask? Look at Haiti. Your area has recovered, primarily because of the exact same thing Mattb4 posted, accumulated wealth already in place. Haiti, on the other hand, hasn't. It may never. Granted, some of their problems are with their govt. Their problems wouldn't be near as bad if they didn't have near nothing to start with.

Here's an example. I have a saw in my basement (several actually). I'd bet my next pay check the neighbor has one too. Probably all of my neighbors have saws. In your typical shanty town in a third world country, how many people would you expect to have a saw in the same square area? 2? 1? 0?

Kev, I don't think we're as bad off as you might think...
 

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The Country is not prepared at all. We tend to think that there are more survivalists than there really are. We are a tiny group when you consider the general population. We make up way less than one percent of the population.

Americans in general are the ones to blame for the economic woes of this country. If we bought AMERICAN MADE products then we would be supporting American jobs. We do not. As a people we buy the cheapest not the best. We support Walmart not ourselves.

Don't blame the corporations for job loses. It is the American consumer that has driven jobs overseas.
 

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JMO we [OUR GOV] starting with nixon opened the door for china then nafta sent jobs to mexico. because of the high tax rate on corp.s and the countless enviromental laws and all the hoop,s the large and small co,s have to comply with. drove all the manufactureing job to china and korea and nam and? Until we place high enough tariff,s on imported goods so that MADE in AMERICA happens again by makeing it profitable to make goods here then we will just go farther down the well.
 

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I really do think it depends on where you live and the people you know. i live in a fairly small town and we've been hit just as hard as anybody else. But lots of people on my street have gardens, lots of people have preps, and theres a great community spirit. We had a big storm back in the spring that knocked a bunch of trees down. Soon as the rain let up everyone and grandma had come out, got chainsaws going, cleared the mess up. Kids are draging smaller sticks and everyones helping out.

Even when I went to school, most of the people I hung out with or talked to where reasonably prepared. just got to look in the right places.
 
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