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Didn't want to hijack another thread but this post really caught my eye,

Shuold i start worriing about my salt stocks? I always thought that salt was a safe item. Salt is a preservative last time I checked, why would i need to take it out of it's original container? How much salt do you really need, a couple of soda bottles of salt sounds like over kill to me.

Sugar definately needs to be kept in an air tight bug proof container. why not use the food grade buckets instead?
You should store as much salt as you can.

Yes, salt is a preservative, an extremely GOOD preservative even in wet climates.

Say you get lucky, and take down a deer. You have no refridgeration. Can you eat all the avalible meat off that deer in 2-3 days? Probably not. But if you rinse the meat with water, then dry it, then completely cover the raw meat in salt, you can preserve it theoretically for decades. Just gotta keep giving it the sniff test. (yes it really works)
 

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I've got about 200 lbs of table salt and 50 lbs of rock salt.
500 lbs ...WOW..
Salt is cheap, have to buy more. If nothing else, good trading stock.
 

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What happens when you run out of your salt in nature where can you get it? How do you preserve your deer?

Also, the eyes of your kill, eaten right out of the socket, provides salt to your diet if worse comes to worst.
 

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Lucky I live on the coast. Can always get sea salt with some work.
Would rather have many buckets set aside.
Salt here is going for about $7.00 for 25 lbs. might seem high , but this is Alaska.
 

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DIY RPG's
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i currently stand at 350 lbs. of table salt and then 100 lbs. of the non table salt kind.
you can never have enough salt if your planning for TEOTWAWKI... but like everything else prep in proportion.
 

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wow- i am way behind. I only have 75 lbs. It is cheap so I guess I should run to Sam's tomorrow...
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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Primitive man lived just fine with no salt. It's not the salt alone you need, it's the minerals in general. Salt is only one. it's easy to get, so in modern society it replaces a large variety of minerals we actually need.

If you forage plants, they absorb a good variety of minerals from the ground. Primitive man got thier fill from the plants they foraged.


If you smoke the meat when you dry it, it will last for months. Also, I have made home made jerky by drying/slow cooking the meat in my oven, and eaten it 6 months later. It was fine.

I never refrigerated it. I just had it in ziplocks forgotten about in my pack from the previous camping season.

To dehydrate meat in the oven, cut it thin and place it on racks. Slow cook it over night with the oven on the lowest setting. If you like, you can soak it in spices for a day before you make the jerky.

The dryer you make it, the longer it will keep, but the more cardboardy it will taste.

I have super dried meat before, to be used in making soups. It is real good that way because it rehydrates when you make the soup.

every spring i make as much jerky as I can this way so I have it when i go camping (which is really back packing at a family camp site)
 

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I guess I'm even further behind as I only have about 1/2 a shaker left. I'm not planning on stocking up on salt or using it as a preservative/brine. I plan on smoking/drying the meats I take. Gonna farm salt as I'll be close to salt water and use it for condiment/barter.

The best way I saw of farming salt was in the Philippines. They put long plastic tarps in the sand and weighed down the corners/edges so it wouldn't blow away. Then they made several long furrows and put the ocean water in them. After a few days of nice weather the water evapoated and lots of sea salt was left behind for them to sell in the market.
 

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Primitive man lived just fine with no salt. It's not the salt alone you need, it's the minerals in general. Salt is only one. it's easy to get, so in modern society it replaces a large variety of minerals we actually need.

If you forage plants, they absorb a good variety of minerals from the ground. Primitive man got thier fill from the plants they foraged.


If you smoke the meat when you dry it, it will last for months. Also, I have made home made jerky by drying/slow cooking the meat in my oven, and eaten it 6 months later. It was fine.

I never refrigerated it. I just had it in ziplocks forgotten about in my pack from the previous camping season.

To dehydrate meat in the oven, cut it thin and place it on racks. Slow cook it over night with the oven on the lowest setting. If you like, you can soak it in spices for a day before you make the jerky.

The dryer you make it, the longer it will keep, but the more cardboardy it will taste.

I have super dried meat before, to be used in making soups. It is real good that way because it rehydrates when you make the soup.

every spring i make as much jerky as I can this way so I have it when i go camping (which is really back packing at a family camp site)
So, how would you slow-cook/dry your meat over a campfire? Put the meat higher up? or Farther away? or just use hot coals and bury it underground?
 

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Didn't want to hijack another thread but this post really caught my eye,



You should store as much salt as you can.

Yes, salt is a preservative, an extremely GOOD preservative even in wet climates.

Say you get lucky, and take down a deer. You have no refridgeration. Can you eat all the avalible meat off that deer in 2-3 days? Probably not. But if you rinse the meat with water, then dry it, then completely cover the raw meat in salt, you can preserve it theoretically for decades. Just gotta keep giving it the sniff test. (yes it really works)

Good steal, useing raw salt as a meat preserative is how things used to be done. You don't need the fancy iodized stuff for this so no need to have a shelf covered in morton's.

I would have to be lucky to get a deer, LOL
 

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Good point on smoking royal dragon, smoking has got to be top dog when i'm concearned about meat life. You can smoke any meat even fish does well.
 

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Don't use the iodized salt for meat preservation. It gives the meat a metallic taste.
I keep 50 lbs iodized, 250 sea salt.
 

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So, how would you slow-cook/dry your meat over a campfire? Put the meat higher up? or Farther away? or just use hot coals and bury it underground?
Reply]
Make an enclosure around your campfire. Think Log cabin, only with this it is a log oven. You just hang your meat cut in thin strips in the log oven and harvest when dry enough.

it's the same as a gass oven. You just have to make a good enclosure. I have seen Youtube clips where it is done with a tarp as the enclosure as well.

The main point is you need to make some sort of heat trap that will keep it close to 250 degrees inside.
 

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I don't mean to hijack this thread but if you are planning on smoking your meat to preserve it, you should start trying to do tht now. Smoking meat doesn't actually preserve the meat. It is the drying action of the air the fire makes that helps preserve the meat. Smoke is the way of keeping insects off of the meat as it dries. It also imparts a nice flavor. The first year I tried smoking I was very disappointed. All the fish rotted and much of the venison. Also, smoking is a bit harder than hanging meat over a smoky fire. The smoke should be contained in some way around the meat. Flies will go through a little smoke to lay their eggs but a great deal of smoke they will not. So a portable smoke house of plastic or better yet skins need to be used or a person can set up a permanent smoke house or get a smoker for small catches of meat.

I just wanted to warn people that smoking alone will not preserve meat. If you are planning on using this as your main presevation tool, it would be best to start now so if you need to throw out the bad food it won't mean your starvation. We do smoke our meat, but it was a long learning process in which we lost many pounds of meat before we perfected it.

Best of luck.:thumb:

BLT
 

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I brine cure pork every year when I kill a pig. Salt pork last about two years in the brine if it is done right. The fat starts to yellow after that... smells a little weird also...
 

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Also, the eyes of your kill, eaten right out of the socket, provides salt to your diet if worse comes to worst.
Saw a film on the Inuit (eskimo) a long time ago. One thing that sticks in my mind is all the kids scrambling around as the fish were prepared and competing for the eye balls that the adults would pop out and toss into the fray.

Mmmm....
 

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Don't use the iodized salt for meat preservation. It gives the meat a metallic taste.
I keep 50 lbs iodized, 250 sea salt.
Interesting. Never experienced this myself. :confused:

No nice way to say it, but if you are not homesteading right now- actually preserving food on a regular basis type stuff, you'll have NO IDEA how much salt you will really need.

This came up a while back here and one gal said "we don't fill our salt shakers but once a year or so." This is NOT what I'm talking about.

I'm talking about stuff like using a 25 lb. bag to work about a half dozen bunny hides.

I'm talking about a time when all of your food is going to come from your storage or what you grow. Now some storage food has plenty of sodium in it- MH, MRE's and short term stuff like wet packed cans of soup, etc.

But the wheat we grow in the back 40 does not, neither do the 50x50 plot of green beans.

You can't guess about what you'll need based off of how many times you fill your salt shaker, it just doesn't work that way....

Consider also that this is NOT something you can grow, raise or easily RESUPPLY. Someone is going to mention getting it from the sea, have you actually ever DONE THAT? Alright then.

Down here it's about $16. for 100 lbs. Pretty much nothing is that cheap anymore. It's got so many darn uses. 100 lbs. per person per year.
 

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Here's a few uses for salt

Use Salt as a back up fire extinguisher

To clean up a dropped egg. If an egg breaks on the kitchen floor, sprinkle salt on the mess and leave it there for 20 minutes. You’ll be able to wipe it right up.

Test the freshness of eggs. In a cup of salt water fresh eggs sink and bad ones will float.

If you want a cracked egg to stay in it’s shell, add a little salt to your boiling water when cooking eggs.

If you want an egg to peel more easily, boil eggs in salted water.

To help to set the egg whites, poach the eggs over salted water.

Egg whites will beat up fluffier, if you put a tiny pinch of salt in them before whipping.

For cleaning pots and pans, pour rock salt onto greasy cookware before scouring to help cut through grease.

Ants in the home? Draw a line of salt to prevent them from crossing.

To prevent ice from forming on windows, wipe down the inside of your windows in the home and car with a sponge dipped in a salt water solution, then dry. This will help prevent ice forming during freezing weather.

To remove tea and coffee stains on cups and decanter, sprinkle salt onto a sponge and use a circular motion when rubbing over stains.

To polish brass, silver and copper. Mix salt and vinegar into a thick paste. Use a soft cloth to apply and buff, then rinse throughly in water and dry well.

Do you have a smelly cutting board? After washing it with soap and water, rub the cutting board with a damp cloth dipped in salt. Let the cutting board sit for a while and then rinse.

Do you have spills in your oven? If food boils over onto the oven floor, sprinkle salt on the top to stop smoking and odor from forming. When the oven is cool. It’ll be easy to brush away from the spot.

Kitchen sponges are the perfect breeding ground for all sorts of nasty bacteria. By soaking a sponge in a heavy salt water solution, it will help kill the bacteria.

Mix 1 part salt to 3 parts boiling water and pour directly onto weeds to kill them.

To prevent a salad from wilting sprinkle with salt.

If you want your toothbrush to last longer, soak it in a saltwater solution before you use it the first time.

To clean your teeth, mix one part salt to two parts baking soda after pulverizing the salt.

Cut flowers will last longer if you add a little salt to the water.

To clean your iron, use salt and a damp cloth.

To eliminate excess suds, put in a sprinkle of salt.

To remove burned on stains in your enamel pans, soak them in salt water overnight and boil salt water in them the next day.

To soothe a bee sting, wet the area right away and then cove it with salt.

To make the meat inside pecans easier to remove, soak the pecans in salt water for several hours before shelling.

To sweeten and deodorize thermos bottles, jugs and other closed containers, use salt.

To prevent mold on cheese, wrap it in a cloth dampened with saltwater before refrigerating.

To deodorize shoes, sprinkle a little salt in canvas shoes occasionally. It will take up the moisture and help remove odors.

If you dip a new broom in salt water and remove it after 20 minutes.

Clean the fireplace: To put off the remaining embers in a fire, douse the flames with salt. This will not only put out the fames, but also make cleaning the soot easier.

To get rid of dandruff rub salt on your dry scalp. then shampoo as normal.

Out of soap? Rub salt on yourself and bathe.

If a dye may run soak the garment or fabric in a solution of 1/2 gallon of water, 1/2 cup of vinegar and 1/2 cup of salt. If rinse water shows color, repeat.

Next: Medicinal uses for salt
 
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