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Bush Walker
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there is no 1 correct answer for this


water first
food second
pick up gear and gadgets as you prepare for food/water based on your specific situation/location/needs -
 

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I guess spend as much as you can without putting a strain on your budget. i buy $250.00 a month infreeze dried food and another $100.00 in ammo or propane cyl for my lanterns just stuff i get off the list people put up here makes me see stuff i should have bought but didnt think of.
 

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Just livin'
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If you do it as a lifestyle rather than an event then cost isn't really here nor there. Oh sure, some things like emergengy water filter systems are beyond most peoples everyday life expenses. But some would say that my dehydrator and canning is too. But preserving from my garden and whatever else I can glean from an ag region is part of my lifestyle. Preserving food is also survival prepping.

So is keeping your eyes open and thinking outside the box. I was once shopping and found 20# bags of white rice on sale for less than $5.00 a bag so I bought 100#. Bingo, at a pound a week I have almost a 2 year supply of rice for 25 dollars. And that just came out of the everyday food budget.

Thats just a few thoughts on your question while having my morning coffee before I start the next round of canning. The bottom line is how much can you reasonably afford?
 

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Contego Libertas
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6,775 Posts
I know you will never have enough survival equipment. I am just wondering, does anybody have an estimation on the cost though?
Really I would think it all depends on what type of preparations you are doing, and how knowledgeable you are.

In MY MIND there are two very different types of Preparations:

Survivalist - The much maligned title people TRY to avoid. However to me this is the type of person who is active in the great outdoors and Prepares according to this type of environment. Not counting books and other instructional material/references, This could vary considerably. There are those that can go into the woods with nothing and be fine, then there are those that would need a backpack full of equipment in order to survive. A BASIC Kit could be as cheap as $10 for an extremely knowledgeable person, or as high as the equipment a person felt needed, which could be Thousands of dollars.

Prepper - This is the person who plans for a "Bug in" type scenario. This could include a Storm/Bomb shelter fully stocked pantry, an arsenal, etc...This COULD go as high as the MILLIONS of $$$..... Again it all depends on many variables.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Really I would think it all depends on what type of preparations you are doing, and how knowledgeable you are.

In MY MIND there are two very different types of Preparations:

Survivalist - The much maligned title people TRY to avoid. However to me this is the type of person who is active in the great outdoors and Prepares according to this type of environment. Not counting books and other instructional material/references, This could vary considerably. There are those that can go into the woods with nothing and be fine, then there are those that would need a backpack full of equipment in order to survive. A BASIC Kit could be as cheap as $10 for an extremely knowledgeable person, or as high as the equipment a person felt needed, which could be Thousands of dollars.

Prepper - This is the person who plans for a "Bug in" type scenario. This could include a Storm/Bomb shelter fully stocked pantry, an arsenal, etc...This COULD go as high as the MILLIONS of $$$..... Again it all depends on many variables.
I see three 'types'.

You do have the classic Survivalists and preppers, but there are also homesteaders.

Homesteaders are often forgotten about in these discussions. [Off-grid, self-sufficient, sustainable lifestyle].
 

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I like to think my job is fairly secure for the time being. So i tend to save some money in the bank for financial purposes, money on hand and purchase things in bulk when i can and use in moderation. Also, i try to teach my kids and wife this: If screw something up at this point in life I can afford to replace it because we are not really hurting for anything and the economy being what it is allows me to. But, in the future when things are scarce i dont believe screwing up and recovering will be an option i can afford to live with.

IF you can afford to do with out now imagine how much ahead you will be later.

jmo
 

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"Survival Equipment" is such a broad term. What does it mean to you? Is it food and supplies? Is it BOV's and bomb shelters? As someone on here said in regards to food, prep what you eat, eat what you prep..that way you are just spending money that you would for food anyway(just always add a little extra in the cart). Medical supplies , most people buy first aid supplies and then run to the doctor for a sniffle. Spend that co-pay on some extra meds and supplies instead of going to the Dr. for minor colds. Protection is going to be one area that is going to require some expense, guns and ammo are not cheap, but with some research and looking you can outfit yourself nicely on a budget. You may not get an arsenal worthy of God-like status on this board but a few well thought out weapons can do the job well. And don't forget two of the most important things in survival are virtually free, knowledge and skill. Learn some new skills by reading and then practicing at home, gardening, canning etc.

Be creative and what seems to be an unsurmountable task can be rather easy
 

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Maybe this can help answer the question:

Food - $2,657 - not counting what's in the pantry, fridge and freezer. Includes freeze dried, pails of beans, rice and other food, Spam etc.

Stuff - $1,832 - not counting firearms, ammo, magazines, reloading equipment and components, clothing, knives etc. Includes propane, Coleman gas, wheat grinder, water filter, gas masks & filters, Camp Chef propane cook stove etc.

Just so happens I keep track of this stuff (recently) so I could give an answer from a one person perspective.
 

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Contego Libertas
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I see three 'types'.

You do have the classic Survivalists and preppers, but there are also homesteaders.

Homesteaders are often forgotten about in these discussions. [Off-grid, self-sufficient, sustainable lifestyle].
I see where you are coming from, however I would still classify them, in terms of "Survival", as Preppers. There are also people that are Off Grid, self sustaining, etc. (Like Amish for example) that are Not preppers. This is why I said it could go into the millions of $$$, and depends on many variables. Is it JUST Solar? Is it Hydro? Wind? Geo-thermal? A combination of all the above? And on and on..... In my mind at least a prepper is anyone who is concerned with surviving IN PLACE, at their residence, whether primary residence, secondary, or tertiary. Preppers Prepare a homestead for long term self reliance, regardless of circumstances. Homesteaders would just be a "Level" of prepper IMO.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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23,954 Posts
I see where you are coming from, however I would still classify them, in terms of "Survival", as Preppers. There are also people that are Off Grid, self sustaining, etc. (Like Amish for example) that are Not preppers. This is why I said it could go into the millions of $$$, and depends on many variables. Is it JUST Solar? Is it Hydro? Wind? Geo-thermal? A combination of all the above? And on and on..... In my mind at least a prepper is anyone who is concerned with surviving IN PLACE, at their residence, whether primary residence, secondary, or tertiary. Preppers Prepare a homestead for long term self reliance, regardless of circumstances. Homesteaders would just be a "Level" of prepper IMO.
Both sets of my grandparents lost their farms to the DustBowl. My parents came 'of age' as migratory farm-workers. It had the effect of making them hoarders. Every scrap of everything is saved. A ham bone [with no meat on it] and a sack of beans is good for feeding a family of 6 for a week. This is an example of 'prepper' that I have seen. Extra clothes, extra tools, and large amounts of food stock-piled away.

I am not AnaBaptist. Though I am a homesteader and I know a great many fellow homesteaders who are likewise not Amish; but who are striving toward self-sufficient lifestyles.

One is to stockpile stuff, in the hope that you will never be without that stuff. The other is to make your own, independent from pop culture.
 
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