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Discussion Starter #1
Due to my current living conditions my prepping is essentially limited to a Bug Out Bag, at current, the bag contains three complete MRE’s and several loose entrees with the chemical heater packs, I’ve also included a few packets of instant oatmeal. I estimate that i have enough food to last approximately 1 1/2 weeks if I ration it out. This might seem excessive, but I felt that it was justified because my work has taken me away from home for at least the rest of this year. In case of some extreme circumstances that would require me to bug out and try to get home, my SUV could do it in two hours, however if I were forced to do it on foot for whatever reason, then I expect that it would take at least ten days, hence the excessive food preps. The bag is not overly heavy, even when my water bottles are full, I would guess that it weighs approximately twenty pounds. It is quite manageable ( for at least three miles). But it’s starting to bulge and there is absolutely no space left for anything else. So what does everyone think, is it too much? If it is , what can be done besides getting a bigger pack?
 

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Indefatigable
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3 MREs and a few packages of oatmeal and it weighs 20 lbs? What else do you have in there?? I can carry more calories than that in a purse. I suggest you add up the calories from the food, divide it by 10 and then only eat that amount of calories per day for the next 10 days. While you sit around thinking about how hungry you are, imagine how hungry you would be if you were walking, all day, every day, for 10 days I think you might drop the word "excessive" from your food preps vocabulary.
 

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OP, do some research on calorie needs and then using a formula estimate your specific needs. My walk home from work would be 2 days on foot. I carry 6000 calories. I'm also counting on already having eaten breakfast and being able to access the pantry and fridge at work before leaving. I would also take into account terrain, necessary detours and weather.
 

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Bear Fighter
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3 MREs and a few packages of oatmeal and it weighs 20 lbs? What else do you have in there??
Water.

A pint's a pound the world around . . . so a gallon of water would be 8 lbs. Two gallons of water and the other stuff would get someone's bag over 20 lbs pretty easy. Of course, it should get lighter as one travels.

Still not sure how a two hour drive would take ten days, unless you're really trying to be stealthy.
 

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essentially, look at what backpackers and hikers will take on a week-long hike, and drop the comfort items. make sure you don't skimp on water and plan out water resupply ahead of time if possible
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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Just a suggestion for the OP.
You probably need a minimum of 1.5 lbs per day.

Ten Day Food Pail (15 lbs)
2.5 lbs (10) MH Entrees @ 4oz
5.0 lbs (10) Cups Rice/Pasta @ 8oz
4.0 lbs (10) Cups Oatmeal @ 4oz + 1.5 lb B Sugar/Rasins
3.5 lbs Lunch/Trail Food/FD Coffee
(Jerky, Cheese, Chocolate, Granola)
 

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Why don't you integrate some webbing and pouches to supplement your pack? Keep some essential items i.e a canteen, knife, fire starters, IFA ...on the rig and more food in the pack. It will also help with weight distribution if done right. Also, by spreading things out if you ever loose your pack you can still carry on with what you have on you.

Godspeed
 

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"Too much" is highly situational. There's no such thing as "too much" gold or ammo for example. Unless you have to swim across a river. Then, very little is too much.
 

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as has been said in other threads from time to time....since you have an SUV, put a bike in the back. even if the vehicle is disabled, you'll be able to cover the distance in a day, 2 tops, that you were doing in the SUV in 2 hours. Well, assuming you're not going over mountains. Are you....going over mountains?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Why don't you integrate some webbing and pouches to supplement your pack? Keep some essential items i.e a canteen, knife, fire starters, IFA ...on the rig and more food in the pack. It will also help with weight distribution if done right. Also, by spreading things out if you ever loose your pack you can still carry on with what you have on you.

Godspeed
My pack does not have any MOLLIE webbing because I am trying to avoid the “tactical” look to keep a low profile, but since you mentioned it, my IFAK does have webb straps that I could pass a belt through and wear as a first line item, which I guess I really should be doing anyway.

For everyone else who was questioning the weight, I have three stainless steel water bottles and I am estimating the weight of the pack when they are full, since that is what I would have to carry. There is of course the regular survival items such as fire starters, a flashlight, maps, compass, spare knife, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
as has been said in other threads from time to time....since you have an SUV, put a bike in the back. even if the vehicle is disabled, you'll be able to cover the distance in a day, 2 tops, that you were doing in the SUV in 2 hours. Well, assuming you're not going over mountains. Are you....going over mountains?
Unfortunately. Yes.
 

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Truth Seeker
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When I day hike I typically take
Cashews 600 cal (fat)
Raisins 400 cal (sugar)
Avocado 330 cal (fat)
Tuna 100 cal (protein)
Sleeve of saltines 13 cal ea (carb)

I leave an orange in the car for the ride home.

1500 no prep, highly nutritious calories for $10
 

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Two hours drive could easily exceed 100 miles plus distance from home, a helluva hike for even very fit people. For someone like me, a very, VERY big undertaking. I’ll second the idea for a bike on board, it’d make covering that sort of distance much more manageable.
 

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KOAD; FOAD; ESAD
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I set up our 3-5 day packs then started small nylon stuff sacks for each of us w[mainly] FD stuff...Mtn House,Backpackers Pantry,jerky,energy bars...anything that catches my eye in a store Ill grab one for ea sack...easy to grab and carry or attach...gives ea of us about 2 weeks w/o need to resupply...
 

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Golfer
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My experience in mountains is how ****ing cold it gets at night. I would give up 3 days of food for an air mattress, but that's me. Maybe instead of putting your cold weather gear in your pack you could wear it. Or drag it behind you.
 

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What would Mal do
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my original BOB seemed great on paper...was bout as heavey as the battle rattle from younger days...my GHB sits at 14lbs....and that's as heavy as I want these days... When I was commuting daily into the city, there was a full sized folder bike and that pack could strap to the rack over the rear tire. I'll also offer that my pack (and especially the original larger BOB) has some modular subpacking...so that I can pull things from it and relocate to my belt or pass off to a companion, or stash it in a hide if I'm hold up in the woods for a bit.
 

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Unfortunately. Yes.
in this case, water is an even bigger concern than i previously thought, because you're going to be so high off the water table you might struggle to find natural sources, depending on the weather and time of year.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
in this case, water is an even bigger concern than i previously thought, because you're going to be so high off the water table you might struggle to find natural sources, depending on the weather and time of year.
Yes, I’m concerned about that too, fortunately the area is big cattle country, the ranchers set up watering stations for their herds, so I packed a LifeStraw in the bag. And also a good stretch of the route runs parallel to the California aqua duct. Most of these “mountains” are more like big hills anyway.
 

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OP can do better going with:

Just a suggestion for the OP.
You probably need a minimum of 1.5 lbs per day.

Ten Day Food Pail (15 lbs)
2.5 lbs (10) MH Entrees @ 4oz
5.0 lbs (10) Cups Rice/Pasta @ 8oz
4.0 lbs (10) Cups Oatmeal @ 4oz + 1.5 lb B Sugar/Rasins
3.5 lbs Lunch/Trail Food/FD Coffee
(Jerky, Cheese, Chocolate, Granola)
When I day hike I typically take
Cashews 600 cal (fat)
Raisins 400 cal (sugar)
Avocado 330 cal (fat)
Tuna 100 cal (protein)
Sleeve of saltines 13 cal ea (carb)

I leave an orange in the car for the ride home.

1500 no prep, highly nutritious calories for $10
-Combinations of above-

Ad in olive or coconut oil. Don't need much, however super handy metabolism wise before sleep, particularly in cold weather. Ad in lentils to go with rice/pasta for more complete nutrition.

Drop the steel water bottles completely, get a suitable sized thermos, or preferably make "cozy / cuzzie" for wide mouth Nalgene bottle(s). "Cook" (rehydrate appropriate foods) on the go in said wide mouth bottle(s).

Easier/safer to "campfire" boil water during daylight, if out of stove fuel, or plan stove fuel appropriate to expected rehydrated meal needs. Or combo carried fuel, along with "campfire" boiled water ie "campfire" daylight, stove to complete rehydration evening meal & cocoa/oil beverage, morning oats. Stealth.

Don't ever campfire where you will sleep/nap. Have appropriate clothing/sleep system for the expected weather conditions, plus a reasonable temperature margin. Stealth.

Fat/oil/cocoa drink is helpful for "warmer" sleep in cold weather. Just a teaspoon of olive oil /coconut oil in cocoa. Will help keep most folks healthily regular, particularly as most folks will up the rice for carb loading.

Home made rehydration powders/commercial rehydration powders to stave off muscle cramps from long haul days.

If extra water carrying capacity is of concern and deemed a necessity to have at hand, use Camel back/Platypus/Hydrapak type bags. Sizes are available from small all on up to multi-gallon. Most folks are only familiar with hydration pack sizes 2L and up.

Properly retort packaged basics, and commercial freeze dried (MH) will far outlast useable / palatable / nutritional lifespan of MRE's. Even moreso if said BOB is stored in a vehicle!

Off the top of my head, most MRE useable / palatable / nutritional lifespan runs around 3 years. From manufactured, not from purchase, stored at a stable 70(ish) degrees. Drops significantly (down to months) if stored at higher temps, as in a vehicle, in the summer.
 
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