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One decade later...
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Discussion Starter #1
Tomorrow the entire day, and through the night I am going to spend my whole time seeing if I can live off of what I just have in my survival bag and all. I am wondering though, after I gather rabbits/ squirrels, how long will I need to cook them for? I plan to use an open fire, and even a little cooking pan, kind of like the one below but is square.

My question though is how long should I cook the meat for so that I insure it is safe to eat?

All replies are greatly appreciated.

The cooker I will be using looks like the one in the link below, although it is square instead of circular.

http://www.wisementrading.com/outdoorcooking/wilderness_griller.jpeg
 

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You would probly be better off Roasting it in small pieces and then cut into it to see if it's done. That thing with that long handle you would proble burn it up on the out side and it will be Raw on the inside.
 

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You would probly be better off Roasting it in small pieces and then cut into it to see if it's done. That thing with that long handle you would proble burn it up on the out side and it will be Raw on the inside.
I agree. It depends on the size of the meat as well. And im sure you will not have a meat therometer with you so, I would cut it into smaller pieces and cook them. I would start with about 10-15 minutes per side until its done, just check it, you will burn it easily over fire.
 

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Mountain Critter
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My preference is to chop up the meat and boil it in a tin can, etc, because this allows you to keep all of the nutrients/juices that you would lose in roasting over the fire. Then after you have finished your meal, you can boil the bones again for broth, and extract more nutrition still. Of course, will matter a lot more in a long term situation than it will on your one day and one night exercise, but is good to keep in mind.

To make sure it's done, just boil/cook until there is no pink left and the juice that comes out when you squeeze a piece of it is clear.

As far as the rabies issue.....if you suspect an animal may have rabies, DO NOT eat it! Best not to even handle it. The disease can be transmitted through the blood, and it is not safe to clean and skin the animal, let alone plan on eating it.


But, depending on how you are planning to "gather" the critters, you'll be pretty lucky to get anything the first day, anyway.

Enjoy your outing, and let us know how it goes!
 

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You can cook it on a spit, or in a fry pan. a fry pan will make it kind of dry (to me anyway). For squirrel, (small ones) skin like normal, gut then remove the tail stub, and head, run a spit rod or stick straight down the center, season, and roast under indirect flame (flames touch occasionally) for about 15 minutes, turning about every 3-4 minutes. When you think it is done, check the meat by cutting into it (while on the spit rod in case it needs more time). I like them with garlic, salt, pepper and the secret ingredient being a pinch of taco seasoning. Makes em mild "spicy".

Rabbits on the other hand (if big enough) require almost entirely non contact heat, not farther from the fire, closer to the coals on the outside of the fire. Otherwise the outside will be crispy and burnt. You can also fry them up.

Boiling is one of the harder methods to ensure a "clean" meal. If the meat is contaminated, it takes much longer at 212 to sterilize the water and the meat. Come to think of it, I have never boiled anything wild. That one would require much research to make sure.
 

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One decade later...
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Discussion Starter #7
My preference is to chop up the meat and boil it in a tin can, etc, because this allows you to keep all of the nutrients/juices that you would lose in roasting over the fire. Then after you have finished your meal, you can boil the bones again for broth, and extract more nutrition still. Of course, will matter a lot more in a long term situation than it will on your one day and one night exercise, but is good to keep in mind.

To make sure it's done, just boil/cook until there is no pink left and the juice that comes out when you squeeze a piece of it is clear.

As far as the rabies issue.....if you suspect an animal may have rabies, DO NOT eat it! Best not to even handle it. The disease can be transmitted through the blood, and it is not safe to clean and skin the animal, let alone plan on eating it.


But, depending on how you are planning to "gather" the critters, you'll be pretty lucky to get anything the first day, anyway.

Enjoy your outing, and let us know how it goes!

well, getting something my first day hopefully will not be much of a problem, and I do actually plan to film most of it so if possible I will post a video.
 

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All most all food borne illnesses can be prevented by bringing the meat to F165 for 15seconds. That is all it takes. I think boiling is the best way to get as much of the nutrition as possible from the meat. Cut it into small pieces and bring it to a boil as long as the meat gets to F165 you should be safe. If you think a animal may have rabies avoid it at all cost, but if I understand correctly the only way to get rabies is from it saliva or blood coming in direct contact with your blood, but I maybe wrong.
 

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I know it is 165 but the problem doesnt come from getting the water to 165, it comes from getting the meat (all the way through) to 165. It takes much more to get the food in the water to 165, than it does the water. Water is a great conductor of heat, the meat on the other hand is not. It will not heat the meat as fast as the water. Remember the meat all the way through must be 165+. boiling will work in the kitchen, but in the woods it will take quite a while to keep meat 165+ in boiling water.

Plus, there are spores in meat that are NOT killed by 165 degrees, botulism comes to mind. Home canning of meat calls for temps over 165 for a reason, because 165 doesn't kill everything, it kills most things.

165 is called ultra pasteurized, not sterile. If something lives, it could kill you.
 

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One decade later...
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Discussion Starter #10
I thank everyone for all the replies, I plan to do the open spit, by cutting into smaller chunks. I would not boil because that will take quite a bit of time, not that it isn't a good idea, but time isn't really on my side.

One other question I have though, is what about if I get meat all throughout the day, but cannot refrigerate, how do I keep it good? If I already gutted it, would the meat stay fine or can it still spoil? :confused:

Thanks again for all replies, they are greatly appreciated.
 

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You can boil a squirrel till the meat is falling off the bones and pick the bones out and save them like Freedomofthehills said. Put you some dumplings in the squirrel meat and broth and you'll have some squirrel and dumplings.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
For broth, could I use the liver/heart, or would this be unsafe? I know if the liver has white/yellow spots to automatically throw out, but would it be safe to ingest?
 

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You are right you must get the meat to F165 not just the water. By adding the small cut up meat to the water, as soon as you put in on the fire, it should reach F165 by the time it has a good boil.

Botulism if I remember correctly can only live in the a zero oxygen environment. And is found in the ground. The most likely way to get botulism is from a improperly canned food item, or dented can (most likely potatoes or carrots) . It is one of the most deadly of food borne diseases
 

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Mountain Critter
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For broth, could I use the liver/heart, or would this be unsafe? I know if the liver has white/yellow spots to automatically throw out, but would it be safe to ingest?
If from a healthy animal, the internal organs should be quite safe, and in many ways more nutritious than the meat. And the liver contains a good bit of fat, which in a longer term situation is something you will quickly become short on, if living mostly off of small game like rabbits and squirrels. And don't forget to crack the bones for the fatty, nutritious marrow.
 

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Zomby Woof
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I always just cook them on a spit over the fire. the front will be done before the rear unless you put them ass first into the heat.
Put some butter, salt, pepper & garlic powder mixed in a ziplock or something to baste while roasting.
Sqwak-on-a-stick, can't be beat except maybe for Bluegill-on-a-stick.
 

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Watch for boils with rabbits very important! You'll see if they have boils as soon as you start skinning there on the underside of the skin if they are infected throw them in the fire to help keep the infection from spreading DO NOT EAT!.
 

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Zomby Woof
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im still trying to figure out how you "gather" rabbits and squirrels??:confused:

i sure hope he took some ramen with him....:rolleyes:
I have used the 20G "gathering" method with success.
I had planned to use the .22LR method today but ended up staying home to clean up, etc...

Tomorrow I will "gather" some sqwak for the crock-pot and report back...
 
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