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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mostly I have been using carcass from Costco rotisserie chicken. It makes pretty good stock, gelatinous, but how long to cook? What about using an instant pot?
 

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I think 6 hours minimum, 10 hours preferable. Depends on how thick you want it. I use most of mine for oatmeal, and I like it positively gelatinous so I try for 10 hours or even more if feasible. I load it down with veggie scraps too.

I've never liked the results of instant pot stock. I'm not sure what the difference is though, it just comes out thin and tasteless. My only guess is the instant pot doesn't allow evaporation and therefore reduction.
 

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How long to cook depends on what bones and how much you are trying to get out of them. If you're making classic ramen broth from raw bones, the answer is 8 to 12 hours.

If you're just making soup from the leftover bones of a roast bird, you can brown the bones and then simmer for 1-1/2 to 2 hours with mirepoix and a bouquet garni to make your stock. Then turn that into whatever type of soup you desire.

If you're trying for more gelatin/bone mineral extraction, then you can leave it all simmering in a crockpot overnight/up to 12 hours again.

Add some acid like wine, vinegar, or lemon juice to the water to get the most collagen extraction.
Do This for Thicker, Richer Homemade Chicken Stock
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I add a shot of vinegar and never have a vinegar taste.
I'll try cooking roasted chicken carcass longer, I've only been going about an hour. Do be careful to keep to simmer only, though I had hopes for instant pot.
 

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I add a shot of vinegar and never have a vinegar taste.
As long as you don't add more acid than can be neutralized by the alkaline calcium carbonate you extract from the bones, you won't detect any acid taste when your stock is done because there won't be any acid left in it.
 

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I place bones and all scraps (including fat) in a crock pot, cover with plain water only, and put it on low overnight, or all day. My soups / broth always turn to jelly. There is no need to add anything but water.
 

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We bake 3 chickens for dinner here , when we are done I take the big meat off the bone
add salt a celery stick a carrot 2 onion 1/4 cut .
I like to chop up the the bird with my chopper and boil till bed time 🤷‍♂️ Then it sits on the stove till morning so I’m sure it cooks in my cast iron pot for a few more hours .
In the am I put the stock in the frig if I’m not going to use it or remove the bones and all the nasties and get ready for chicken and dumplings 👍
 

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Don't know how long, but I looked for some beef bones to make broth. They were $5 - $6 for a small one. No meat...just 1 bone. I don't get any beef due to bad teeth, can't chew it. But I figured I could get a little bone nutrition.
 

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I think they are out of there minds selling bones 🦴 the butcher put them out here but when they don’t sell he throws them away .
How about ham hocks , 3 bucks each . Crazy but I like them in my bean soup .
 

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Mostly I have been using carcass from Costco rotisserie chicken. It makes pretty good stock, gelatinous, but how long to cook? What about using an instant pot?
Are you talking about bone broth?
My wife does that all the time I thought she said she had cooked it in the insta-pot in an hour or so.
 

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I add a shot of vinegar and never have a vinegar taste.
I'll try cooking roasted chicken carcass longer, I've only been going about an hour. Do be careful to keep to simmer only, though I had hopes for instant pot.
Insta pots have a low setting for sautee as I'm sure you are aware. It doesn't hurt to expiriment with it. I have actually started using my insta pot to make gumbo, roux and all. I know, the sacrilege of not using my black iron pots!!!
 

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Our family's handed-down instructions are overnight on low simmer. When all the meat has fallen completely off the bones and the outside looks dull and dry, they're done.

As 44Guy said, if your broth jells (not just fat hardens) when it cools you've done it right. Takes some getting used to for people who are accustomed to canned soup. I think that's why I don't like the store kind of bone broth; they don't skim it properly and it's greasy. Good bone broth that's been cooled and had any residual fat taken off is not greasy at all. It does wonders for your arthritis and general aches and pains. Good for a cold, too, if you used the onion/celery/carrots for the stock.
 

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I hope i'm not jumping on the thread but since we are talking about broth. How long will it will it be good for if you can it?
 

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I hope i'm not jumping on the thread but since we are talking about broth. How long will it will it be good for if you can it?
Hard telling, but several years for sure. We do a pretty good job of keeping that rotated and don't have any older than 2019 in the pantry. We actually use it as a gravy base more often than as a soup base.
 

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I'm envious, y'all!
My wife doesn't cook like this (and I ain't about to start telling her how to!)
My father was also generally sensibly averse to telling my mother how/what to cook.

OTOH, his solution to the envy of other people's food problem was to make all the stock/soup himself (along with all the bread). Just sayin'. ;)

For the rest, he told me how to cook instead. More than one way to skin a cat, etc. :LOL:
 

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I boil chicken and turkey carcasses when we are done from the main (first meal). II save all the bones with gristle, break up the carcass and put in a stock pot and boil until there is no more gristle.

That means the carcass no longer holds together.

You will need to strain all the bones out, let it cool and then skim the fat, but what you are left with is true gelatinous stock. Use it 1:1 with water, and whatever you want to include in your soup.
 
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