Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I read somewhere on another prepper forum that a guy said "Dry" pasta can be saved up to 20 years

When I search
AndI look on different articles like this

It will say up to 3 years after the "expiration date" on the pasta..

So what is it? 20 years? or more like 5 years?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
I'm currently eating pasta bought in 2011. Still in its original packaging it was stored in a ziploc bag inside a plastic storage box and put in the cupboard. It cooks and tastes the same.
Would be happy to eat it if it was 10 years older. It seems to keep forever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Ive eaten pasta stored in its original packaging, in my cupboard that was 8 years past its BB date and it cooked and tasted fine. Packaged properly, I would imagine at least a decade past BB date but likely much longer.
Strange that with a google I don't find direct claims how pasta can be saved for decades. But for rice I find it can be saved up to 35 years.
Anyway thank you for your reply!

I heard pasta can be best saved between 5 degrees and 24 degrees celcius.
What would a hot summer do to shelf life, when a room is like 30 degrees celcius, mutiple summers?
I even save it at my attic (since that is empty.)Which probably may very well be 35 degrees celcius on a hot summer day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
What would a hot summer do to shelf life, when a room is like 30 degrees celcius, mutiple summers?
No effect whatsoever. That is how mine is stored. I live in a hot area and I don't air-condition preps, I just store foods that keep in hot conditions. Wheat grain and white rice also store well in these temperatures.
But it is very dry here. Hot and humid conditions may affect the pasta unless it is stored airtight. I have no experience with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
No effect whatsoever. That is how mine is stored. I live in a hot area and I don't air-condition preps, I just store foods that keep in hot conditions. Wheat grain and white rice also store well in these temperatures.
But it is very dry here. Hot and humid conditions may affect the pasta unless it is stored airtight. I have no experience with that.
Spaghetti and macaroni are stored in plastic. https://www.testberichte.de/imgs/p_imgs_supersize/996288.jpg https://static.openfoodfacts.org/images/products/20012168/front_fr.33.full.jpg
I also have "mie pasta": https://static.openfoodfacts.org/images/products/20634957/front_en.4.full.jpg
But I suppose a box is not "vaccuum" air tight?!
And I also have glass jars with veggies I store in the same conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
I don't see why dry pasta would be any different than say, flour.
I regularly use pasta that is 4 or 5 years old with no problem. I have never been able to smell rancidity, though I realize the nose can't always pick up on it.



Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

·
Crazy Cat Lady
Plan to Alamo at home.
Joined
·
16,266 Posts
I've had some in a glass jar it is fine. I would keep it at room temps, though.

I lean more towards rice these days.
 

·
BASS
Joined
·
2,108 Posts
Strange that with a google I don't find direct claims how pasta can be saved for decades. But for rice I find it can be saved up to 35 years.
Anyway thank you for your reply!

I heard pasta can be best saved between 5 degrees and 24 degrees celcius.
What would a hot summer do to shelf life, when a room is like 30 degrees celcius, mutiple summers?
I even save it at my attic (since that is empty.)Which probably may very well be 35 degrees celcius on a hot summer day.
I freeze my rice and pasta for about two weeks at zero degrees. I put them in freezer weight zip type bags before I freeze them and put the dates on a piece of paper in the bag. I have rice that is about 10 years old and we had some last week and it was fine. This week we had angel hair pasta that is at least 4 years old. That was fine also. I find freezing is the key for long term storage. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,642 Posts
I once stored rotini in mylar and buckets with 02 absorbers. Opened it up about 7 years later and it was just as fresh as the day I bought it. I'd say storing it that way would get you 20-30 years like any other dry good.
When I first got into prepping (about 2013), that was one of my initial preps--I still have buckets filled with mylar bags of pasta.
 

·
Registered
Packed and Ready
Joined
·
306 Posts
I have vacuum sealed jars of elbow macaroni and Bow Tie pasta and I expect it to be good for at least a decade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
I am still eating a huge bag of penne pasta I got at Sam's club in 2010. Stores in it's original packaging it's tastes great.

Bet it can last another 10 years!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
I read somewhere on another prepper forum that a guy said "Dry" pasta can be saved up to 20 years

When I search
AndI look on different articles like this

It will say up to 3 years after the "expiration date" on the pasta..

So what is it? 20 years? or more like 5 years?
Vacuum sealed with an O2 absorber and you are looking at 30+ years
 

·
Golfer
Joined
·
4,353 Posts
Not too long ago I feasted on a bag of Top Ramen noodles that were 10 years old and kept n the garage in Houston. The packaging must have been insect-proof because I didn't get any. I did not use the flavoring packets but the noodles themselves tasted like they were brand new.
 

·
Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
Joined
·
67,101 Posts
Not too long ago I feasted on a bag of Top Ramen noodles that were 10 years old and kept n the garage in Houston. The packaging must have been insect-proof because I didn't get any. I did not use the flavoring packets but the noodles themselves tasted like they were brand new.
Then your nose is one of many that has trouble detecting rancidity. Unlike regular pasta, those noodles are fry dried and loaded with oil that goes rancid. It's a shame too, because they'd make a good prep if they lasted longer. You can get premium ramen that isn't fried, but that sorta destroys the economy factor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I've been bagging, freezing and storing pasta in food grade buckets for years and haven't had issues.
We slowly rotate ours as it's cheap enough to buy in big lots and is something we eat often.
Having said that, we did eat a big batch of 5 year old pasta from storage we have elsewhere and it was perfectly fine.

Have been wanting to pack pasta in Mylar with O2's in the buckets, but I'm doing fine so far and the Mylar and O2's can be used on other stuff as I don't have a money tree growing here.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top