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off-grid organic farmer
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Discussion Starter #1
In my household, I find that I am the one here who is most hesitant to eat wild game, and roadkill.

My thinking is that I can only fry something for so long without burning it.

I do fry somethings, but I tend to burn anything that I fry.

When it comes to roadkill or wild game, if there are any micro-organisms, tiny parasites in the meat, I want them dead.

I can boil something forever without burning it.



As a teen, one of our local churches held an annual Portuguese 'soupa-feed'; where one rancher would donate his oldest bull. They would cut him up and distribute the meat into six 50-gallon stock pots. All the church men would stand shifts stoking wood fires underneath those pots. For four days they would keep those pots boiling. At the end of four days of boiling, the old tough bull is reduced to a lot of thick beef broth. The church has a huge feast followed by a dance, the beef broth is served poured over a slice of fresh hard-crust bread. IT IS GOOD EATS!



So with this background I make stew. We have a deep stock pot. This thing is 2 foot tall.



Let me give an example: this past month, I was culling chickens. I butchered 2 every day and put them into the stock pot to boil. The stock pot usually already has some water in it, I add more water just to cover the carcasses. It boils all afternoon and evening. We check every few hours to add a little more water, when I go to bed I take it off the wood stove. In the morning my DW lifts out each carcass and pulls any remaining meat off the bone. Most of it falls off easy when you lift the carcass. The meat she canned each night, and once a week she canned the 'liquid' as broth. After a week of boiling chicken carcasses, the liquid is really thick anyway and it has a lot of lard in it.

So how is this an example of how we handle roadkill?

We do a similar procedure with roadkill that we suspect may be carrying parasites.

I butcher the game and put it into the stock pot to boil. I add water just to cover the carcass. It boils all afternoon and evening, we check every few hours to add a little more water, when I go to bed I take it off the wood stove. In the morning my DW lifts out the carcass and pulls any remaining meat off the bone. Most of it falls off easy when you lift the carcass. We strain the meat and chop it into tiny pieces, and return it back to the stock pot.

Then we add garlic, leek, and onions; and some mint, thyme, rosemary, and oregano. We let it boil for an hour [to blend the flavours], before putting in carrots and potatoes. When the carrots and potatoes begin softening, we add barley, just enough barley so that once it begins to expand and absorb the water it will thicken the stew.



Anyway I was asked how I cook wild game and roadkill. This is how we do it.

I have a tendency to burn stuff, so I have found that making stew is fool-proof.

If you suspect that your possum, fisher-cat, or musk-rat may be too 'gamey' to be edible, the blending of: garlic, leek, onions, mint, thyme, rosemary, and oregano, may be just enough to make it palatable for your family.
 

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Interesting. I assume you are only eating fresh roadkill. My question would be how to tell if it is to old to eat or not?
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Discussion Starter #4
Interesting. I assume you are only eating fresh roadkill. My question would be how to tell if it is to old to eat or not?
How old the critter was?

It makes little difference.

You can boil stuff for days and days if needed. Eventually the meat will soften up.

I gave the example from my hometown where they boil the oldest bull. Which would normally be considered far too old, far too tough to eat.

Boiling that tough old guy makes some good eats. :)
 

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Actias Luna
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How old the critter was?

It makes little difference.

You can boil stuff for days and days if needed. Eventually the meat will soften up.

I gave the example from my hometown where they boil the oldest bull. Which would normally be considered far too old, far too tough to eat.

Boiling that tough old guy makes some good eats. :)
I think the person meant how long it had been roadkill. I personally am very fearful of eating something that isn't just killed. Yes, we hang our deer and other meats but they are gutted prior to being strung up. My little boy and I have some serious tummy troubles and I know what happens to us if our food isn't stored properly, at least that's what I assume causes our troubles.

Anyway, I may not be able to digest the stuff but I think it's really cool that there are people that utilize it instead of letting it go to waste.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Discussion Starter #6
Salmonella is one of the toughest bugs found in food. Most bugs are easy to kill. But Salmonella is tough.

It can survive for weeks outside a living body. It has been found in dried manure still alive and deadly after over 2.5 years.

Salmonella will die after being heated to 131 °F for one hour, or to 140 °F for half an hour.

To protect against Salmonella infection, food must be cooked.

Salmonella is not destroyed by freezing.

You can not fry meat for an hour without burning it.

So unless you prefer Cajun-style food, the only alternative is to boil it.
 

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Salmonella is one of the toughest bugs found in food. Most bugs are easy to kill. But Salmonella is tough.

It can survive for weeks outside a living body. It has been found in dried manure still alive and deadly after over 2.5 years.

Salmonella will die after being heated to 131 °F for one hour, or to 140 °F for half an hour.

To protect against Salmonella infection, food must be cooked.

Salmonella is not destroyed by freezing.

You can not fry meat for an hour without burning it.

So unless you prefer Cajun-style food, the only alternative is to boil it.

Ahh, but you can broil it, e.g. steaks and such. As long as you get the meat to rare of medium rare you are ok.. Helps to be sanitary about handling and oh umm if you are woried about eating pestilence. DON'T EAT ROADKILL!!!!!:mad::D: Salmonella dies relatively quickly on the grill.

How could you even consider it? I've been po before. Surely I have. My family, like most in the winters up north have either run over a deer or heard about one on the scanner. That's ok because its wintertime and most pestilence isnt going to live thru a Canadian Clipper winter. Especially if you live north of Lake Superior on the North Shore.


But, squirrel, possum, and other rodents etc...ICCCKKKKKKYYY!!! Trichinosis is a big thing with those animals.

If you have to boil it forever to make it safe to eat... go kill something else!!

From what I've read FBK has a lot of great ideas.. but this one scares me lol:)
 

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But, squirrel, possum, and other rodents etc...ICCCKKKKKKYYY!!! Trichinosis is a big thing with those animals.

If you have to boil it forever to make it safe to eat... go kill something else!!

From what I've read FBK has a lot of great ideas.. but this one scares me lol:)
that's partly why i don't eat pork.. trichinosis is a big issue with pigs as well..
 

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that's partly why i don't eat pork.. trichinosis is a big issue with pigs as well..
Actually it isn't, especially after laws were passed about cooking garbage for swine feeding. I had a friend who looked for Trichina in pork samples for his master's thesis in pathology. He never found ANY in hundreds of thousands of samples that he examined. I have heard that it is a problem in bear meat, however. Salmonella and pathogenic E Coli are probably bigger problems especially in an ungutted animal lying around on a road side for who knows how long.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Discussion Starter #10
Ahh, but you can broil it, e.g. steaks and such. As long as you get the meat to rare of medium rare you are ok..
There is a limit to how long you can broil meat until it becomes cajun-style.

Rare meat has NOT been heated enough to kill all pathogens; simple fact.

If you trust the supplier of the meat, great. A steak house for example, if they serve bad meat, they get shut down fast.

So after SHTF when you are in 'survival' mode, feel free to walk into your local steak house and order up rare beef.

I am thinking that after SHTF all of those steak houses will be gone.



... Helps to be sanitary about handling and oh umm if you are worried about eating pestilence. DON'T EAT ROADKILL!!!!!:mad::D: Salmonella dies relatively quickly on the grill.
BS

Is that why folks die from salmonella poisoning? If it is so quickly killed by grilling, then why does the FDA get involved?

Hey if 4 minutes on a grill kills all salmonella, then ignore the FDA the next time they send out warnings.



When was the last time that you grilled meat for over an hour?



... How could you even consider it? I've been to before. Surely I have. My family, like most in the winters up north have either run over a deer or heard about one on the scanner. That's ok because its wintertime and most pestilence isnt going to live thru a Canadian Clipper winter. Especially if you live north of Lake Superior on the North Shore.
You lost me there.

What does 'po', or living North relate to trapping vittles?

Parasites do live through the winter. I have no idea why you would think that winter would kill meat parasites.



... But, squirrel, possum, and other rodents etc...ICCCKKKKKKYYY!!! Trichinosis is a big thing with those animals.

If you have to boil it forever to make it safe to eat... go kill something else!!

From what I've read FBK has a lot of great ideas.. but this one scares me lol:)
So this is not about what is safe to eat, but you being squeamish?

I see, thank you.
 

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good lord, Beekeep, why are you eating roadkill? sounds like you have a great garden, orchard, etc up there...

when i saw the title of this thread i thought for sure you were joking... :(
 

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Meat that is falling off the bone rotten is perfectly safe to eat if you pressure cook it for 90 minutes. Dogs don't even have to use a pressure cooker, maybe it helps to roll in it first?

I don't know about you all, but I hate to see all the wasted deer along the road. I think it's actually illegal to pick them up here, they would rather pay someone to pick them up and pay someone else to destroy them.
 

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Just a rock & spear guy
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good lord, Beekeep, why are you eating roadkill?
Waste not, want not. Wouldn't be the first time I've bunny ala bumper.

Great OP, I'll keep your stew recipe in mind when I check the conibears tomorrow. :thumb:
 

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Tuefel Hunden
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Meat that is falling off the bone rotten is perfectly safe to eat if you pressure cook it for 90 minutes. Dogs don't even have to use a pressure cooker, maybe it helps to roll in it first?
Yeah, but its the taste that gets to you. Rotten meat is a hard taste to adjust to. Also, dogs will eat about anything, including their own poop!

I don't know about you all, but I hate to see all the wasted deer along the road.
Me to don't like the waste! It is sad about the legalities, wasting perfectly good road kill should be a crime! Its all about control!
 

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Survivor
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I use a rule of thumb if its stomach or in testines are ruptured dont eat it, if it smells dont eat it, anything else gets a slow roast over the embers....
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Discussion Starter #17
good lord, Beekeeper, why are you eating roadkill? sounds like you have a great garden, orchard, etc up there...

when i saw the title of this thread i thought for sure you were joking... :(
I do some trapping, mostly to reduce the damage that beaver do on our land.

I could do some hunting, we certainly do have plenty of game here. I routinely see deer, moose, and bear on my land. But we have too much meat already. I have given permission to neighbors to hunt on my land, if they need some meat. For the most part everyone in this township already has full freezers.

Most of the time when I shoot varmints it is while I am feeding our chickens and I spot fisher-cats lurking near my chicken coops.

In this state anytime you see roadkill, if you are not going to take it for yourself, then folks are encouraged to report it to the wardens. Our wardens maintain lists of families who need meat.

I have had to stop my car twice due to beaver having blocked the road with freshly dropped trees. Both times the beaver have been very intent on dragging their tree, so I grabbed the tree and helped them to drag it across the road. Unfortunately both of those times I did not have a firearm in my car.



Anyway I got a PM from a guy who had read where I spoke of trapping. He asked me how to cook varmint. I got to writing a response to him, when it occured to me that really my response would be better as a public post maybe as a thread instead of a private PM.

:)
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Discussion Starter #18
Meat that is falling off the bone rotten is perfectly safe to eat if you pressure cook it for 90 minutes. Dogs don't even have to use a pressure cooker, maybe it helps to roll in it first?

I don't know about you all, but I hate to see all the wasted deer along the road. I think it's actually illegal to pick them up here, they would rather pay someone to pick them up and pay someone else to destroy them.
My Dw loves her pressure cookers. You can do wonders with one. :)

Fortunately in this state we are not restricted from picking up roadkill. And if you dont want to go looking you can just call the wardens and put your name on their list. I am not sure about it but I have been told the wardens will even deliver.
 

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So are ya'll saying that basically it is good to eat regardless of how long it has been dead. All you have to do it boil the crap out of it or pressure cook it for a couple of hours? Really? The meat doesn't get to a point where it is inedible? I mean if that is true it's definitely good to know. But I have always thought that after a several hours it starts going bad... What if it is to the point where it is all bloated and such. Is it still good?
 

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Tuefel Hunden
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If you suspect that your possum, fisher-cat, or musk-rat may be too 'gamey' to be edible, the blending of: garlic, leek, onions, mint, thyme, rosemary, and oregano, may be just enough to make it palatable for your family.
This is a great idea and recipe for most things, not just road kill! Oh yeah, whats is wrong with road kill? Nothing! It is all about your ability to make great table fare. I know lot of folks who could cook up most meat and you wound'nt know what it was!
 
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