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Ryding Free...
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This is a kit I bought from Harbor Freight!

I'd never done this before so here's the story:


It weights in at about 200 lbs and only cost me $270. I have to

The downside? I have to build it!









The next stage was securing the leaf-springs to the trailer. The guide was vague but I got the right stuff in the slots!

Once this was done it was time for the critical axle to be installed and clamped into place onto both leaf-springs with a set of U Bolts and steel plates. Then is was just a case of getting the wheels on.

Wheel Bearing assembly​





I took apart one hub assembly to have a good scan about inside. The Oriental Factory people had pre-greased it but I added some more just to be certain.

Once the hub assembly was slid in I just had to add the crucial 'castle nut' flush then back it off 1/6 of a turn so the thing could spin freely.

The tools I used to get the hub cap off. You don’t have to remove the entire hub assembly though, unless you re re-greasing it, or wanting to mount it to the axle easily.

I almost forgot to put the cotter pin through the axle!





Wiring the cabling for the brakes and signal lights was a bit niggly but I got it done.



This is crimped and heatshrunk. Earlier I had tried soldering it with a Harbor Freight butane torch but it wasn’t fine enough and kept melting the adjacent wiring.





Got these boards for helping make the trailer bed and box.


Work on the boards and 2x4s for painting.



 

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Ryding Free...
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Discussion Starter #2
Here's the 4x8 board being matched up for the trailer frame:





The bottom was already painted with four coats of white gloss paint. This is the side that will be exposed to the road-spray etc.

Making some notches for it:



The side bracers need to be modified slightly. Here's the tools I used for cutting the notches:





Back to the electronics:

Getting the side-indicators wired up with the join-crimps.





Also have only just gotten around to mending the wing mirror (following the theatrics with a blown tire-remold).

It’s a waiting game for the inspection now, which is a legal requirement to pull it around on the highways of Colorado...
 

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Ryding Free...
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Discussion Starter #3
Here’s the trailer ready to roll out for the inspection, I’ve removed the board so the inspecting officer can see the electrical wiring.





The journey to the trailer inspection depot complex was uneventful. I have to say that apart from the 'max speed of 55mph' warning on the tires the trailer functioned pretty good.

On getting there I put my rusty trailer-reversing skills to the test and moseyed on in to the complex.

The building was like something from Gattaca - all isolated and in stark contrast to the surroundings of high desert plains. An interstate was nearby and I noticed a lot of highway patrol machines. My appointment was with a deputy sheriff no less and out we walked to inspect the trailer.

He wasn't a nit-picker and gave it the once over, then checked the lights were functioning and operating ok. Then it was a case of filling out paperwork and off I trundled to the registration office!

This was only a sidenote at this stage though as I had to get the actual cargo box built for the great voyage north!

But that is another story, for another post... :)
 

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Ryding Free...
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Discussion Starter #4
Completing the Trailer Build.

Having a simple bed trailer is fine and dandy, but I wanted a real box trailer for cramming in many hundreds of pounds worth of equipment for a long haul to distant lands without messing with tarps and ropes etc.



The bed for the trailer was bolted down. I only used four bolts and thread-locked nuts but it will do the job ok.



The side bracers would take some work, these needed a custom fit and a lag screw going into the base-section of each 2x4.



The sides and the roof were braced from front to rear with 2x4s internally. My friend was a help with this as he'd already built similar boxes for his old pickup truck. He also helped with the roof section.



It's getting there, just need to get the front and rear sections on. My friend advised to get them both screwed on, but I wanted much better. I wanted a door section for the rear piece for better practicality, but I had to build it first!



It was time for measurements and skillsaw moves...



The front is now done, now onto the rear cargo door...



Some small noggins for the hinges and a hasp lock were what the door started with:



This gives you an idea of the interior specifics. The 2x4s brace the sides and allow the 4x8 sections to join together. I'll add some more for added structural strength later.



Additional bolt-locks are added to the cargo-door:



I deliberately made the hasp and bolt locks slightly offset so by lifting the door slightly it seals a lot better to the main-body of the cargo-box.
 

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Ryding Free...
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Discussion Starter #5
The trailer is nearly read to roll, both bracers are installed in the internal corners:



The trailer was packed at only 1/4 capacity when I went on a road trip. According to the paperwork, it can take a weight of more than 1,000 lbs! We shall soon see...

The trailer didn't give me any issues, but I kept the speed to 55 mph which meant for a leisurely, but slow progress to the destination, my first stop-off for cargo-loading.



Arrival in Wyoming.

 

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Ryding Free...
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Loading up for the big 1000 miles journey.







It took me two days of traveling to get to the Green Havens of the PNW.

Driving at 55 mph for nearly all the way was a laborious task after the 500 mile mark.

I slept at a rest area, with a trailer though I could park with the big rigs which I find are a light blocker and don't tend to move as much. I would have preferred to sleep in the trailer than cramp-sleep in the back of the pickup, but I wasn't about to unload any of the stuff at the rest area. 12 hours of road time later I got close to my destination. Once I was under 50 miles to go time didn't seem to drag so much anymore.

Finally though I made it. The long exodus was at an end. The tall, green forests of the All-Forest were everywhere and the sun was blazing down.



The trailer held together, although one of the side bracers was loose and two of the bolts had come partially apart from their wooden noggins! All that had prevented the door from flying open was my trust hasp lock and the chunky padlock I'd used! Minor repairs were needed! Yet I the trailer had done its duty and I hope this guide and mini-story is helpful.

To those that need to haul their own stuff without paying U-Haul Rent this trailer fits the bill! :)

If you have any questions please ask and I will try and answer them.
 

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:thumb::thumb::thumb::thumb:

The only things I'd do different -- I'd paint the frame black - only because I really hate red :mad:

Wrap all the wires in Accordion Tubing :thumb:

And 5/8 ths. or 3/4 - PT plywood ;)
 

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P/SS -- Now get creative and build a front "road stuff" storage box on the front -- midway between the box & the hitch about 1/3 the way up ( all the way to the top would be best ) - but with a 45 * roof ---- the "V" shape with the roof will cut down a bit on the - "pushing a shoe box through molasses" - wind resistance ;)

One or two doors on the outside large enough to remove the spare - and a locked from inside - interior door is nice ;)

And if you wanna go really nutz ---- install a floor scuttle hole --- large enough for ----- you :eek:
 

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PSSS -- I read a bit better with my good eye :xeye:

Get at least 4 more bolts into the deck to frame and through bolt everything with large fender washers and all galvanized no brites used -- zero lag bolts anyplace :thumb:

Autozone for a tube of dielectric grease -- q-tip in "all" elect. connections -- even the lamps --- you'll thank me next year ;)
 

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Hello,
Probably 10 years ago I built one from Harbor Freight. It was a 4'x8' that could hold 1720 lbs. One thing that you could do (that I did) is weld all the joints together instead of relying on just the bolts. My trailer has hauled a lot of stuff including firewood without any problems !!!!


Pumpdaddy
 

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Jeep addict extrodinaire.
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Good job on the trailer and congrats on a successful trip!
I agree with Ricekila on the non red paint. I'd go so far as using 3/4 on the decking and then use a spray on bedliner to coat everything underneath. The OSB (oriented strand board) you used isn't really well suited for outdoor, longterm use and will decay fairly soon once water finds a way in. Metal would be better but marine grade plywood isn't a bad option.
If you really want to see some neat stuff based on these HF trailers, go to the Expidition Portal site and look for a guy named Jscherb (?). He has some mad skills and has built a number of things/variants using HF trailers as a start point.
 

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Jeep addict extrodinaire.
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Cheap, spray on undercoating encapsulating everything. ..yes. :)
As much as I enjoy some HF cheap stuff... do not use their spray on bed liner. I bought a couple cans just to give it a try. Used it on the beat up hood of my jeep cherokee. While it went on ok, it seems to have little to no UV protection. After a month or so it faded to grey and has begun to flake off. Duplicolor or rustoleum make a better product. Or order some online from raptor.
 

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Ringin Your Gong From 600
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As much as I enjoy some HF cheap stuff... do not use their spray on bed liner. I bought a couple cans just to give it a try. Used it on the beat up hood of my jeep cherokee. While it went on ok, it seems to have little to no UV protection. After a month or so it faded to grey and has begun to flake off. Duplicolor or rustoleum make a better product. Or order some online from raptor.
Goid point. I was considering Duplicolor as 'cheap', meaning not the expensive Kevlar roll on products. :)
 

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Jeep addict extrodinaire.
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Goid point. I was considering Duplicolor as 'cheap', meaning not the expensive Kevlar roll on products. :)
I used the old blue can Duplicolor for years and loved it. The roll on was more cost effective for larger, flat-ish areas. The spray cans great for hard to reach areas. For some reason those (can and spray) started hitting the clearance sections and then all but disappeared. I believe they may have relabeled it or changed it? I've only used the "new" version a few times but it seems ok. Still way better than the HF junk.
 

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Thats what i thought.
1/2 " ply would weather longer I think. Especially if you seal the edges right.
A HPDE bed would be my preference though.

Not as cheap obviously :thumb:
 
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