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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I assume the pre ground packaged coffee will go bad in 2yrs or so. Would mylar bag storage of roasted beans be the best way for long term?
 

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Store green beans in Mylar bags with dessicant ...store that in a 5 gallon pail. should last 15+ years.

Green coffee beans can be stored for up to 10 years in a dark cool
> place. As a matter of fact most coffee sold in stores sits in a
> warehouse for a couple of years before it hits your shelves.
>
> When placed in a super pail with the mylar bag and oxygen absorber
> packs you should get 15 years+. One pound of coffee roasted and
ground
> yields 50 average strength cups. So two people drinking a 10 cup
pot a
> day will get 5 days per pound of coffee. A 50 lb bag of beans
should
> last 250 days so to lay in a 15+ year supply you would need about
22
> bags. If the SHTF and we're cut off from the java that figure
doesn't
> seem too hard to come up with. If normalcy isn't restored by that
time,
> or the good lord hasn't tapped me on the shoulder and said "let's
go"
> then I guess I'll start choking down self picked herbal teas
 

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Wake up and smell the coffee

I am repackaging ground coffee into one gallon sized Mylar bags with oxygen absorbers. I know this will vastly improve the shelf life, but I don't know how much extra time this will buy. Since oxygen absorbers are relatively new, there is not a lot of data available about what repackaged self life to expect.

My plan is to continue repackaging, and to test a bag about 2 years after the original best-by-date. I will continue to occasionally test batches until I get some coffee that taste a bit off. At that point I will have a better idea about the (bag and absorber) "protection factor". I would love to have a firm answer, but don't think I have time to wait for someone else to do the homework.

Traditionally only dry items have been candidates for bag and absorber packaging. That is a good general rule for real long term storage, but does not mean that removing the oxygen from items like coffee, very slightly oily, will not vastly extend the shelf life.

I expect "world events" will overtake my little experiments, and I will be drinking my coffee long before it goes bad. I don't think we have time to wait 5-10 years for someone to do test to determine all the unknowns for us.
 

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I buy the large cans when they are on sale and store them in the chest freezer.
Maxwell House, Folgers, Kroger, they are all good as long as there's caffeine in it.
If the shtf and the supplies gets scarce, we'll just empty out one of our oil tankers and make a run to Costa Rica.:D:
 
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hope this helps

I have had good luck with Windy Mae's and Frugal squirrel, they are both the same company, ask for Sara if you call and have questions. I also have had good luck with USA Emergency supply. They are both good companies. If you are new to this type packaging there are some good videos on line demonstrating the process that you can Google. I do recommend using a regular iron to heat seal the bags, and save the money you might spend on a heat sealer.
 

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good to the last drop

The cans are already vacuum packed to some extent, the "hiss" of in-rushing air used to be part of coffee companies TV commercials to make it sound fresher. The new plastic cans are not the best as the seals are not great. Foil baged ground and beans are also partially evacuated.

Making a partial vacuum reduces but does not eliminate the oxygen, but it helps. Removing moisture, light, and oxygen are the way food is preserved. I would not waste the expensive vacuum sealer bags repackaging canned coffee, however, I do think the oxygen absorbers are worth the extra effort. Note, if the item to be preserved is moist, then there are some smelly anaerobic (without oxygen) type processes that can ruin your food.
 

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I think if theres any length of time that your roasted and ground coffee is stored before you drink it, that you'd be about as well off drinking instant. That or just stockpiling no-doze. The flavor will be evaporated after prolonged storage.

The way to do it is green beans. It's also a good way to do your everyday coffee, so you simplify as well. It's also much cheaper to get the equivelent quality coffee in unroasted form. There's nothing to roasting it at home. I just use a little one cup stainless measure over the gas range. Put it on a low heat and hold above the flame, stirring constantly. Cool it in a mixing bowl by swirling it around, drawing out the heat, and then blow the husks out the door. Grind and brew. Some of the best coffee I've ever tasted and it only cost me $6/lb. Go green, man.

I don't feel like researching right now, but I believe the beans off-gas and you'll need to take that into consideration. Whether that means not vac sealing them or no oxy absorbers, I can't remember. Half gallon mason jars sound pretty good to me, unless somebody has a better idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have been reading about using electric popcorn popers the forced hot air type to roast yer beans with. Looked interesting. Just had me an idea, I have a heat gun so take a metal can punch some holes in it and have a ******* coffee bean roaster:D:
 

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I get the 3 pound bags of organic stuff at Costco and repackage in vac-packed 1 lb amounts, frozen to maintain their quality...if I were to go whole-hog, I'd get green beans, practice roasting with primitive methods, and still vac-pack and freeze for quality.
 

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try growing yaupon holly on your property.it is a good looking shrub,makes a delish cup of joe and has about 3 times the caffene of coffee!!!:eek:
 
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